Pokémon Best in Show – Unmasking Mimikyu

The Nightmare of Alola

The Pokémon VGC 2017 season rule set brought with it a plethora of bulky and slow Pokémon. This shifting of the speed curve has seen the rise of Trick Room tactics, as can be seen by the Porygon2 on almost every Trainers team. Do not let this fool you, however. While Porygon2 is a fantastic Trick Room setter and utility Pokémon, he is not the best of the format. That title goes to Mimikyu.

Once you get past Mimikyu’s frighteningly cute exterior, you will quickly realize the arsenal of tools and tricks it masks under its sheet. Whether it is scaring opponents with a Never-Ending Nightmare or constructing a Trick Room, when Mimikyu is summoned it must be dealt with.

Mimikyu Breakdown

Mimikyu stat chart

Image courtesy of Bulbapedia

Taking Mimikyu at face value, it seems like a somewhat underwhelming specimen. While its Ghost/Fairy typing leaves it with a single double-resistance to Bug, and three immunities to Normal, Fighting, and Dragon, its stats leave much to be desired.

Special defense it Mimikyu’s highest stat, boasting a base of 105. However, Mimikyu’s pitiful base HP of 55 means that it won’t have the staying power to take many hits regardless of how hard it tries. Rounding these out with an average 90 base Attack and 96 base Speed, and it is easy to see why Mimikyu can get overlooked.

Trainers who follow this line of surprise are in for a shock. Mimikyu makes its average stats absolutely workable by means of a great move pool and amazing ability. The combination of these two factors leads to a game winning machine.

Don’t be Fooled by the Disguise

What really makes Mimikyu such a versatile asset while team build is the tools it can bring to a team.

First is Mimikyu’s signature ability, Disguise, acts as a single-use substitute for Mimikyu. Basically, the first time Mimikyu would take damage during a battle, the damage nullified and the Disguise is broken. From that point on during the battle, Mimikyu can be damaged normally. Disguise does not prevent status effects.

Busted Mimikyu

Image courtesy of Game Freak

Disguise will basically give Mimikyu one free pass. This can allow it to do things such as set up Trick Room for its team or boost itself with a Sword’s Dance. It can also serve to give Mimikyu a free switch in. Whichever you choose to use Disguise, it is easy to see how effective this ability can be.

Moves to Die For

While focusing on Mimikyu’s Disguise can be tempting, forgetting about the moves it is packing can be deadly. Mimikyu is anything but a one-trick pony.

Here is a list of moves you can expect to encounter during the course of VGC17:

Offensive:

  • Play Rough – Physical Fairy STAB attack. Packing 90 Base Power and hitting most things for at least neutral damage. Play Rough’s only real drawback is its 90% accuracy rating.
  • Shadow Claw – Physical Ghost STAB attack. 70 Base Power and 100% accuracy makes it weaker, but more reliable than Play Rough. However, the two moves provide 100% neutral coverage.
  • Shadow Sneak – Priority Physical Ghost STAB attack. 40 Base Power and 100% accuracy. Shadow Sneak is good due to the fact it provides elevated priority.
  • Wood Hammer – High Power Physical Grass attack. While gaining no STAB, Wood Hammer provides a massive 120 Base Power at the expense of recoil damage.

Support:

  • Taunt – Prevents opponents from setting up. As well as shuts down status effect users, and protects. Great Trick Room counter.
  • Will-O-Wisp – Burns a Pokémon causing residual damage. Also lowers the opponent’s Attack, causing their physical damage to be lowered.
  • Trick Room – One of the greatest threats Mimikyu has on the right team. Reverses speed priority causing slower Pokémon to go first.
  • Swords Dance – Boost Attack stat by 2 levels. One Swords Dance will allow for immense pressure on the opposing team.
  • Thunder Wave – Paralyzes and reduces speed of opponent. Recent changes have reduced its accuracy to 90% however.
  • Curse – Causes massive residual damage to the opponent at the expense of 1/2 the user’s HP. Can be used to break walls.
  • Toxic – Applies poison damage that increases each turn. Another way to build residual damage and break walls.
  • Destiny Bond – Faints the opponent if Mimikyu faints. Paired with Ghostium Z, Z-Destiny Bond also takes on the redirection of Follow Me.
  • Protect – Standard VGC move

An Item for all Occasions

Depending on the moves Mimikyu runs, here are a few items you can expect it to be holding:

  • Ghostium Z – Dual use item. Use to either turn Shadow Claw/Sneak into Never-Ending Nightmare for serious damage. Otherwise, you can augment Destiny Bond to add the Follow Me effect.
  • Fairium Z – Used to turn Play Rough into Twinkle Tackle, providing Mimikyu with a great way to take out major threats.
  • Mental Herb – Heals effects such as Taunt and Encore. Especially effective on Trick Room builds as Mental Herb + Disguise can practically guarantee turn one Trick Room.
  • Focus Sash – Due to Disguise, Focus Sash isn’t as useful. On a Swords Dance variant, it can provide a second layer of protection to set up a sweep though.
  • Life Orb – Increase damage output and does damage to the user in return. Great item for a Swords Dance Mimikyu.

Whether you choose to run Mental Herb, or Ghostium Z, on your Trick Room Mimikyu, the options are plentiful. The ability to leave the opponents guessing is one of this Pokémon’s greatest assets.

Sample Builds

 

Mimikyu sprite

Mimikyu @ Ghostium Z
Ability: Disguise
Level: 50
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Trick Room
– Destiny Bond / Taunt
– Shadow Claw
– Play Rough

This is standard Trick Room support. Disguise works to give Mimikyu the leeway to make things happen on the first turn. Trick Room is used to give your team an advantage against faster opponents. While Destiny Bond or Taunt are taken depending on Mimikyu’s partners. Shadow Claw and Play Rough are just there for offense once supporting is done.

With Ghostium Z, the Destiny Bond variant can become particularly deadly. Using Ghostium Z will give the trainer an option to either launch a devastating Never-Ending Nightmare. Otherwise, they can power-up Destiny Bond. Adding a Follow Me effect to Destiny Bond, thereby allowing Mimikyu to redirect opponents and allow its partner to set up.

Mimikyu sprite

Mimikyu @ Ghostium Z / Fairium Z / Life Orb
Ability: Disguise
Level: 50
EVs:  252 Atk / 4SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly / Adamant Nature
– Swords Dance
– Shadow Sneak / Protect
– Shadow Claw
– Play Rough

Hyper offensive Mimikyu variant. The simple goal of this set is to use the safety of Disguise to boost with Swords Dance. If successful, Mimikyu can become a force to be reckoned with. There are few Pokémon in the VGC meta game that can take a +2 Twinkle Tackle.

With Mimikyu, You Can

No matter if you need an offensive pivot, a reliable Trick Room setter, or a supplementary support, Mimikyu has you covered. This is the Pokémon to consider if your team is missing that extra oomph. Whatever you do though, don’t look under its sheet.

Pokemon Mimikyu jump out

Image courtesy of Game Freak

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Play pokemon vgc logo

Three Interesting Stats Halfway Through the 2017 Pokémon VGC Season

A Plethora of Pokémon

Half way through the season and one thing is certain, no meta has developed. Having completed nine events so far, VGC 17 has yet to see a single team reign supreme. Due to this, some 25 Pokémon have found their niche and appeared on the winner’s pedestal during the course of these nine events.

Pokemon who have placed first vgc 2017

Though no core of Pokémon has risen to dominance yet, one core has seen more play than any other. The AFK core, consisting of Arcanine, Tapu Fini, and Kartana, has been popular; but thus far it has only finished first in one out of nine major events, piloted to victory by the great Markus Stadter during the Dreamhack Regionals in Germany.

World Class Trainers

Even though there are still four months to go until the Pokémon VGC World Championship, 23 Trainers have already qualified for an invitation.

VGC 2017 Pokemon Standings

These are the trainers lucky enough to have earned enough Championship Points for an invitation so far. Will one of these 23 be the very best? Only time will tell.

Trainers still have time considering there are still two International Championships, as well as a plethora of Regionals and other smaller events to go. Names like Aaron “Cybertron” Zheng, and Gary Qian, still have time to claim an invite.

Going Against the Grain

2017 is the year of the Tapu and Ultra Beast. Introduced in Pokémon Sun and Moon, these creatures are incredibly powerful. It is no surprise then, that they have appeared on every winning team of a major VGC tournament. Every winning team except for two.

Image of Gavin Michaels

Gavin Michaels Second from the left | Image courtesy of @komvgc

Those two teams belonged to the same Trainer, Gavin Michaels. Gavin was able to claim victory in both California Regionals during the winter matches. Winning both tournaments without use of either a Tapu or an Ultra Beast. Truly a feat to watch.

All images courtesy of Game Freak

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Sao Paulo’s Attendance Cap – Another International Issue

These International Championships cannot seem to distance themselves from controversy. First, London’s timing and team sheets, and Melbourne’s lack of a stream. Now, an attendance cap for the upcoming Sao Paulo International Championships. The tournament is only a month away, and this news has likely ruined a number of non-South American player’s planned trips that were not courtesy of an official stipend.

First, Let’s Talk About Melbourne

Failure to provide live coverage from another large tournament? Sounds like TPCi.

After setting up the International Championships structure, and allowing top players from across the world to compete in different countries, you’d think there would be an extra push to stream these high-profile tournaments. Sadly no, and we’ll likely never receive an explanation for why this happened. Streaming should be a priority for TPCi when it comes to an international event. Getting people to watch the game will only help it grow. We as spectators should not have to rely on Twitter or other unofficial sources (that usually do an amazing job) for live coverage. I can understand not streaming a few regionals. However, there is little excuse for not streaming the International Championships, regardless of what country they’re in.

Now Onto That Attendance Cap…

128. 128 players is the max attendance for an International tournament. Does this bring back memories of how the 2016 World Championships was closed off to spectators, and how we found out about it only a month in advance?

Seriously, I have no clue why TPCi would have an attendance cap that is lower than the amount of players at Worlds last year. Not only that, they’re giving stipends to the top four players in each region. This further restricts the number of players who are able to compete. For a series of tournaments that encourages players to travel to other countries, it makes little sense to cap the attendance at such a low number. It also makes the communities’ efforts to organize tournaments to award stipend money a complete waste at this point.

Another aspect affected is Championship Point and prize money distribution, if the player number were to not reach 128. How CP and prizes are given is based on attendance. For example, if 127 people were to enter instead of 128, Championship Points would be distributed to the Top 16 instead of the Top 32 according to the current system. This is more of an issue with the number the player cap is set at rather than there being a cap at all. This wouldn’t be an issue if the cap wasn’t in place, however.

To make matters worse, since this is now a smaller tournament, there’s probably not going to be an effort to stream this event either.

What Does This Mean for Indianapolis?

Honestly, I have no clue. North American tournaments are usually well organized. In light of the circumstances that have plagued these Internationals, there’s a reason to be worried. TPCi needs to drastically improve their communication with their players, as announcements like these cannot be tolerated. It seems like every announcement about these tournaments are nothing but bad news. Players will continue to voice their complaints into the void of Twitter, only to not receive any official response.

If you would like to view the official announcements for the Latin America International Championships, check here for stipend info and here for more info on the attendance cap.

Images courtesy of Pokemon.com

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Pokemon togedemaru steals the show

Pokémon VGC 2017 Collinsville Regional Wraps Up – Alex Underhill Takes First, Togedemaru Steals Show

Farewell Collinsville

Competition wrapped up this weekend at the Pokémon VGC Collinsville Regional tournament, and fans were not disappointed. Around 300 Trainers showed up for their chance at walking away with $3,000 cash, and Championship Points towards entrance to the World Championship. While many Trainers competed, only one proved he had what it took to be a champion. Alex Underhill marveled the crowd as he battled his way to his first major VGC victory.

Alex Underhill using Togedemaru to win Collinsville regionals Pokemon

Image courtesy of @LexiconVGC

Alex combined offensive pressure from Gyarados and Arcanine, with Celesteela’s stalling ability. To top it off, Alex’s centerpiece was his Togedemaru, a little steel mouse capable of unnerving foes with its shocking tactics. Throughout the entirety of the tournament, Alex impressed the crowd with the expert use of his Togedemaru. Whether it was faking out opposing Tapu Koko, or Encoring Kartana into repetitive sword dancing. Alex was nothing short of fun to watch.

Togedemaru Wasn’t the Only Interesting Trend

Pokémon Togedemaru

Image courtesy of Game Freak

Togedemaru may have Zing Zapped his way into the fan’s hearts with his shocking display, but there was another interesting trend occurring. Teams running Tapu Lele and Drifblim were on full display in Collinsville this weekend. In fact, four of the top ten teams ran the combo. If this sounds familiar, it should be. This is because Tapu Lele and Drifblim are the pair Shoma used to claim victory in the recent ONOG Pokémon Invitational.

Watching the impact Shoma’s play had on many of the Trainers was an interesting thing to see. Even the second place finisher, Justin Berns, was using Tapu Fini and Drifblim. However, the disruption caused by Togedemaru’s antics just proved too much to overcome. After three full rounds, Justin found himself yielding victory to Alex when the final match came down to Snorlax versus Celesteela.

See You Down Under

melbourne australia for pokemon international

Image courtesy of Australia.com

The next major Pokémon VGC event will be the International Championship in Melbourne Australia. This will be the second in a series of four tournaments in the brand new International Championship Series. With a massive Championship point payout and open admittance to all Trainers worldwide, International Championship Series tournaments promise to bring a large crowd of talented Pokémon Trainers.

Scheduled to begin March 10th, the tournament will run until March 12th. Make sure to keep an eye out for new strategies. Will Porygon2 still be a staple? Could Togedemaru be a surprise VIP? Maybe Evoboost Eevee will take the cake. If nothing else, the VGC 2017 season certainly has been dynamic. See you in Melbourne!

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pokemon vgc regional logo

Collinsville Regional Pokémon Tournament Promises to Entertain This Weekend

Collinsville is Set to Impress

Collinsville Pokemon vgc regional ready to go

February is over and the weather is starting to heat up. So too are the Pokémon VGC tournaments. This weekend is the latest installment in the 2017 Regional series. This match is scheduled to take place in Collinsville, Illinois, 10 miles outside of St. Louis, Missouri.

Registration for the tournament closed yesterday and organizers are saying the turnout should be amazing. With only a limited number of events left before the World Championship, many aspiring Trainers are scrambling to collect Championship Points and win a spot at Worlds.

Things to Look Out For

As we move deeper into the season, there are some key things to keep an eye on. Understanding how the meta is settling is one of the most important factors moving into the second half of the season. A great example of this is VGC 15, where an amazingly diverse pool of Pokémon were suddenly upset by the rise of CHALK.

sprite of porygon2 to be used to collinsville regionalFor one, there is Porygon2. This guy has been a staple of a huge majority of VGC 17 teams up to this point. Will he dominate the regional tournament? It seems likely considering Gavin Michael’s success with hard Trick Room teams.

Then there is Tapu Fini. After a slow start, Fini has slowly become a VGC favorite. Combining her excellent bulk and ability to nullify status effects, with a strong answer to the likes of Arcanine. Can Fini continue a strong showing, or is a new Tapu ready to claim the top spot?

Shoma's team, will it be replicated at collinsville regional

Finally, what impact, if any, will Shoma’s victory at the recent ONOG Invitational have on the metagame. Up to this point, the de facto strategy has been speed control in the form of Trick Room. Shoma proved that there is another way to be successful however, and it will be interesting to see if any trainers have any luck mimicking him at the regionals.

Tune In This Weekend

Site of Collinsville VGC Pokemon regional

Image courtesy of gatewaycenter.com

With the ONOG Invitational’s fiery conclusion in recent memory, the Collinsville regional has a lot to live up to. Matches will be streamed on Pokémon’s tournament site, and luck has it that Collinsville has done a great job with its streams in the past.

Masters Division will begin play around 11:00 am, Saturday morning. Following that, on Sunday at 10:30 am, the Top Cut will take to the field and compete for a winner. Up to $50,000 will be on the line, so everyone is sure to do their best. Make sure to check it out!

All images courtesy of Game Freak unless otherwise noted

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Shoma SHADEviera Winner of ONOG Pokemon Invitational by GEICOGaming

Shoma “SHADEviera” Honami Devastates Competition on Way to Amazing Victory

A Tournament to Write Home About

ONOG Pokemon Invitational GEICOGaming Shoma winner

The ONOG Invitational just concluded and all eight trainers put in a spectacular performance. With eight of the best trainers gathered in one spot to do battle, the ONOG Invitational promised to be a Pokémon tournament to remember. It did not disappoint.

While there was no shortage of talent, one trainer rose above all others in a masterful show of command over his Pokémon. Shoma “SHADEviera” Honami crushed foe after foe on his way to claim the championship in this GEICOGaming sponsored invitational tournament.

Shoma ran a unique team including a Rain Dance packing Drifblim support, slow and bulky Tapu Lele, and a fan favorite Magnezone. While somewhat unorthodox, Shoma showed he was in total control each step of the way.

Shoma "SHADEviera" Hoami team for ONOG Pokemon Invitational tournament by GEICOGaming

Day 1 – Shoma Your Moves

Shoma vs Alex Ogloza in ONOG Pokémon Invitational by GEICOGaming

A first game sweep against Alex Ogloza would see Shoma move on to the Group B Winner’s match. A place he earned after revealing Rain Dance tech’d onto his Drifblim to counter Alex’s Torkoal, a play that sent the audience into shock. With Shoma’s expert reads and unexpected strategies, Alex had little chance at victory.

Although easily securing himself a spot in the Group B Winner’s match, Shoma would find himself against a fierce competitor for Group B’s title. Enosh Shachar, commanding a powerful AFK core, coming off a victory against Markus “Yoshi” Stadter, promised to give Shoma a difficult challenge.

Three games later, Enosh’s AFK core proved too powerful for Shoma to overcome. Enosh earned his will deserved place in the semi-finals, while Shoma resolved to make a comeback in Day 2’s deciding match.

Day 2 – The Gathering Storm

Shoma vs Markus

With the dawn of Day 2, Shoma found himself staring down the great Markus Stadter for one last chance to progress to the semi-finals. Like Enosh before him, Markus was using an AFK core. Though unlike Enosh, Markus would fail to overcome the onslaught Shoma had waiting for him. Markus tried valiantly to withstand Shoma’s might, but between the crushing blows from Gyarados and the psychic blasts from Tapu Lele, Markus’s Pokémon found themselves broken and shattered.

Markus defeated and victory claimed in his deciding match, Shoma marched fearlessly onto the semi-finals. Post Group play matches where to be best of five, and for his match, Shoma would be facing the fan favorite.

Dan “aDrive” Clap, The Shiny Pokémon Hunter, had broken all the odds and found himself face to face with one of the greatest VGC trainers on the planet. Although aDrive gave it his all, in the face of Shoma’s gathering fury, Dan “aDrive” Clap could not weather the growing tempest. Three matches in a row aDrive would fall, fans silent in their remorse as their hero picked himself up. aDrive would not make it to the finals, but he had proven his position at the top of the VGC.

Finals – Power Overwhelming

Countless opponents littered the field as two trainers prepared to face off for the finals. Shoma and Aaron “Cybertron” Zheng both readied for what would be one of the greatest matches in VGC history. In five short rounds, the world would bear witness to the culmination of GEICOGaming’s expertly crafted competition.

Shoma vs Aaron

Shoma only needed three rounds. His spirit swelling into a maelstrom, Shoma mercilessly ran through each one of Aaron’s Pokémon. One after another fell as the crowd went wild, and soon after the series started it was quite apparent who the winner would be. Shoma “SHADEviera” Honami proved in the face of all odds, that he is truly one of the best Pokémon trainers playing in the VGC. He is also one of the most entertaining trainers to watch.

Shoma

GEICOGaming should be extremely proud of the tournament they sponsored. Congratulations to Shoma for an expert display and masterful victory. Also a humongous thank you has to go out to ONOG, GEICOGaming. As well as each of the eight amazing trainers, and every person who contributed to putting the broadcast together. The competitive Pokémon community thanks you from the bottoms of our hearts. Now lets do it again!

All images courtesy @ONOGesports

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ONOG Invitational – GEICOGaming Puts Its Weight Behind Pokémon VGC

Come One Come All

GEICOGaming ONOG Invitational Lineup

Image courtesy of GEICOGaming

This weekend marked a great day for competitive Pokémon and the VGC. GEICOGaming and One Nation of Gamers brought together eight of the world’s top trainers for a spectacular invitational tournament.

Breaking the eight trainers into groups of four, the initial group play round was double elimination. Trainers competed in best of three format for group play. The four trainers to emerge from group play victorious would move onto semi-finals and finals. In these rounds, trainers competed in best of five, single elimination to ultimately crown a champion.

GEICOGaming sponsored the tournament, covering both the cost of the event along with the $1,000 prize pool. The competitive Pokémon scene has seen few sponsored events, so a major sponsor like GEICO is a promising sign. Given enough success, GEICO may seek further sponsorship of VGC events. Such an occurrence would only bode well for the VGC.

More than Just Saving You Money

GEICOGaming logo tournament

Image courtesy of GEICOGaming

Started in 2015, GEICOGaming was created by the insurance company GEICO Insurance. Driven by a passion for digital offerings, GEICO found a natural ally in the online gaming community. This then lead to the formation of GEICOGaming and hosting various Hearthstone tournaments, such of the ONOG circuit and championship at PAX.

Fast forward two years and GEICOGaming is the leading force in the fast growing world of esports. Not only do they continue to host Hearthstone events, but GECIOGaming has gone on to sponsor two successful esports teams, Team SoloMid and Panda Global.

A Sponsor, a Shiny Hunter, and a Spotlight

For the VGC, this is a great moment. GEICOGaming has provided the format with a platform that it did not have. Combining an expertly crafted broadcast experience, with the esports exposure their clout brings, something magical is happening; people are starting to see how amazing competitive Pokémon can be.

Kotaku even got in on the excitement, publishing an article on Sunday covering some of the drama of the tournament. In an expertly written piece by Jason Krell, the perseverance of Shiny Pokémon Hunter, Dan “aDrive Clap”, can be witnessed as he overcomes two of the VGC’s most prolific talents. In his piece, Jason documents aDrive’s start as a streamer and singles trainer, and walks through his day one invitational victories.

These are the memories that will resonate with the community and go on to last more than just a season. You can even imagine the aspiring trainers watching the stream on twitch thinking, “If he can do it, I can totally do it!” Moving forward, competitive Pokémon needs more of these moments. Finally, Pokémon could have a chance to go from a blip on the radar, to a dominate esport in the fast growing industry.

Doing Your Part

Now with the tournament concluded and the team reports being published, it is easy to think the moment has come and gone. However, that is the wrong attitude to have. If you wish to see competitive Pokémon continue to grow with events like this, now is the time to act. Once you’ve done that, let GEICOGaming know what you thought and how much you appreciated them getting behind this event.

If you haven’t already, follow @GEICOGaming and @ONOGesports on twitter. Once you’ve done that, let them know you want them to keep supporting the VGC. Maybe Game Freak and The Pokémon Company will even take notice and address the aspirations of the competitive Pokémon community.

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pokemon regional championship banner

Winter Regional Diversity – A Look Back at the Last Three Years of VGC

Diversity of the VGC

Each year Game Freak changes up the rules that govern the VGC. With the release of Pokémon Sun & Moon, for example, only Pokémon who can be captured in the Alola region are allowed to be used.

As the metagame develops through the season, sometimes the Pokémon lineups that emerge victorious from the countless tournaments can be varied and unique. However, sometimes the rule-set Game Freak rolls out leaves the meta with little wiggle-room for unique teambuilding. The lack of diversity in the VGC is an often cited complaint for the format. Unofficial formats such as Smogon have even formed to try to solve some of these issues.

So how is the VGC 2017 season stacking up compared to previous seasons? Taking a look at five winning teams from the Winter Regionals of the last three seasons, we can see how the meta is developing.

VGC 2017 Winter Regional Champions

VGC 2017 is unique due to the fact it is restricted to a regional Pokédex, in this case the Alola-dex. This generally only happens when Game Freak releases a whole new generation of Pokémon games to their fans.

Regional dex restrictions can be a mixed bag. Sometimes fan favorite Pokémon are left out, or a poorly balanced Pokémon makes its way into the mix. The one thing that is certain in these instances, however, is there is always an air of mystery as the season progresses.

Let’s take a look at the five Champion teams from the 2017 Winter Regionals.

San Jose, California Regional

Gavin Michaels –

sprite of porygon2sprite of haryanamimikyuAraquanidDrama

 

 

 

Dallas Regionals 

Andrew Nowak –

tap kokokartanaSalamencemudsdale

 

 

 

Georgia Regionals 

Paul Chua –

tap kokokartanaarcanine  muk-alola

 

 

DreamHack Leipzig Germany Regional

Markus Stadter –

tap finekartanaarcaninegar chompmandibuzzsnorlax

 

 

 

Anaheim, California Regional

Gavin Michaels –
mimikyu sprite of haryana snorlax

 

 

VGC 17 Pokemon

Number of times used

Porygon2

4

Araquanid

4

Kartana

3

Magnezone

2

Hariyama

2

Mimikyu

2

Tapu Koko

2

Arcanine

2

Snorlax

2

Drampa

1

Salamance

1

Mudsdale

1

Muk-Alola

1

Tapu FIni

1

Garchomp

1

Mandibuzz

1

With 30 potential slots, only 16 unique Pokémon appeared on these five winning teams. Seven Pokémon had a unique one-time appearance.

Porygon2 and Araquanid come in as the most used Pokémon, with four appearances each. Porygon2’s usage is not surprising at all. Eviolite bulk, combined with a decent move pool and Trick Room support, see Porygon2 as a staple of the VGC 2017 season. Araquanid packs a punch, and becomes a real threat when Trick Room is up.

VGC 2016 Winter Regional Champions

VGC 2016 flipped the rules of competitive Pokémon on its head. Trainers were allowed to include two super powerful Pokémon from a list of what was called “Restricted Pokémon”.

Pokémon such as Groudon, Xerneas, and Kyogre finally had a chance to make an appearance on the MainStage, and they did not disappoint.

Virginia Regional 

Paul Chua –

kangaskhanSalamence regional championgroudonxerneastalonflame regional championsmeargle

 

 

 

Collinsville Regional 

Andrew Nowak –

kangaskhanSalamencekyogre regional championxerneasthundurusscizor

 

 

 

Anaheim Regional 

Aaron Zheng –

Salamencemawilegroudonkyogrebronzongsmeargle

 

 

 

Florida Regional 

Wolfe Glick –

Salamencedialgakyogrelandorusthundurusferrothorn

 

 

 

Oregon Regional 

Randy Kwa –

Salamencegroudonxerneastalonflamesmeargleespeon

 

 

 

VGC 16 Pokemon

Number of times used

Salamence

5

Groudon

3

Xerneas

3

Smeargle

3

Kyogre

3

Kangaskhan

2

Talonflame

2

Thundurus

2

Scizor

1

Mawile

1

Bronzong

1

Dialga

1

Landorus

1

Ferrothorn

1

Espeon

1

Only 15 Pokémon filled the 30 team slots for the 2016 season. Not really surprising considering a third of each Trainer’s teams were picked from a very short list.

What is surprising though is how similar the number of unique winning Pokémon from the Winter Regionals of 2016 & 2017 are. Considering the major difference in rule-sets, it is incredible to see that the overall variety of winning Pokémon didn’t change so much.

VGC 2015 Winter Regional Champions

Oh 2015, what a great season to be a competitive Pokémon fan. Following the regional dex restriction of the 2014 season, VGC 2015 opened up the playing field to all Pokémon, other than those considered restricted.

Many remember 2015 for its diversity, but was the Winter Regional season really more diverse than 2016 and 2017?

VGC 2015

Missouri Regional 

Aaron Traylor –

kangaskhan regionalbisharp regionalconkeldurr regionalclefableheat ranlandorus

 

 

 

California Regional

Alberto Lara –

kangaskhan regionalSalamencerotomsylveonferrothorn regional championlandorus

 

 

 

Virginia Regional

Karl Concepcion

mawilevenusaurchandeluresprite of haryanacresseliabisharp

 

 

 

Oregon Regional

Conan Thompson –

SalamenceterrakionaegislashWeavilecresseliathundurus

 

 

 

Florida Regional Championship

Wolfe Glick –

Banetterotomlandorusheat ranscrafty

 

 

VGC 15 Pokemon

Number of times used

Landorus

3

Kangaskhan

2

Bisharp

2

Heatran

2

Salamence

2

Rotom-W

2

Venasaur

2

Cresselia

2

Conkeldurr

1

Clefable

1

Sylveon

1

Ferrothorn

1

Mawile

1

Chandelure

1

Terrakion

1

Aegislash

1

Weavile

1

Thundurus

1

Banette

1

Scrafty

1

20 original Pokémon showed up in our five Winter Regional Winners of 2015. Top that off with the fact that a single Pokémon showed up three times or more, and a shocking 12 Pokémon showed up once.

VGC 2015 really did shake things up and give Trainers a unique and fun metagame. While 2017 is not nearly as stale as 2016 ended up being, it does not seem to be shaking it up like 2015.

On the Way to Worlds

We are marching closer and closer to the 2017 World Championship, and it will be interesting to see how the meta continues to develop. Will Porygon2 ever fall out of lineups? Are Tapu and Ultra Beasts really as powerful as they seemed at first glance?

One thing is certain right now though, Trick Room is the defacto 2017 strategy to beat, and Gavin Michaels seems to be piloting it with precision. It really makes you wonder what Worlds has in store for us this year.

All images courtesy of Game Freak

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Game Freak: Competitive Pokémon’s Worst Enemy

Build It and They Will Come

Game Freak did a fantastic job creating the Pokémon franchise. Working hard over the last twenty years, the massive following of fans is a testament to this effort.

Coming together for a variety of reasons, all of these fans share a common passion for battling and collecting the hundreds of available Pokémon. Some fans, however, take playing Pokémon to another level. These trainers focus on the competitive aspect of the Pokémon franchise.

The Elite Four is Just Beginning

Game Freak Elite Four

Image courtesy of Game Freak

For trainers around the world, beating the Elite Four is just the start. Seeking a tougher challenge, these trainers search forum groups and message boards for communities that foster the same competitive spirit. This search ultimately leads to Game Freaks official tournament series, the Videogame Championship Series, or VGC.

VGC, while a great offering by Game Freak, falls short of what is needed to truly grow the competitive community. Tournaments are few and far in between. This leads to terrible pacing throughout each season.

Also, the broadcasts leave much to be desired. Some casters make you feel like you are watching a golf tournament, and there is no type of spectator mode. Game Freak has been slow to develop the tools needed to create a powerful viewing experience.

Everybody Loves Pokémon

You would’t think everyone loves Pokémon by the lack of sponsors found in the VGC series. Game Freak opts to avoid sponsorship completely for whatever reason. This is most apparent during major events where long lapses of time go by between matches with “We will be right back” screens in the place of an epic match.

These moments between matches can be filled with commercials and other content. Sponsorship can go even further than that though! Esports teams and corporations around the world would jump at the chance of partnering with Game Freak for competitive Pokémon, I am sure.

GEICOGaming logo tournament

Image courtesy of GEICOGaming

Just as an example GEICOGaming, the esports arm of GEICO Insurance, is sponsoring an unofficial Pokémon Invitational this weekend. Contributing not on the $1000 prize pool, but also all the costs related to hosting the tournament. Now just imagine if Game Freak were negotiating these deals.

 

 

 

 

Game Freak, Your Work is Not Yet Done

20 years has proven Game Freak has created something special. This does not mean Game Freak should ignore such a passionate constituency of their fans. While Pokémon may not be a democracy, Pokémon fans do certainly vote with their dollars.

Game Freak 20 years of Pokemon

Image Courtesy of Game Freak

If Game Freak would take a moment and listen to these loyal fans they really could grow the Pokémon brand even more over the next 20 years.

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QR Rental Teams – A New Way to Play Competitive Pokémon

A New Challenger Approaches

Capturing, Breeding, Training, there has always been a lot of monotony to preparing for a competitive Pokémon match. Trainers spend countless hours picking Pokémon for their team, and working on training the perfect specimen. Each time a trainer chooses to replace even a single member, they must go through the process again. Not anymore with QR Rental Teams.

QR Rental Team scan prompt in game

TPCI has added the option to bypass breeding and training with the introduction of QR Rental Teams. QR Rental Teams allow trainers to register teams they train and share them with other trainers. Has TPCI finally removed the need for breeding and training in competitive Pokémon altogether?

QR Provides First Steps Towards Convenience 

QR codes now grant trainers easy access to battle with teams they put no work into. Simply access teams of Pokémon on the Pokémon Global Link website and generate a QR code for the team. Then scan the generated QR code when prompted in Pokémon Sun and Moon and BOOM, you are battling with a team bred and trained by another trainer.

It has never been easier to practice and battle with some excellent Pokémon teams. QR Rental Teams are not without their restrictions, however. Here is a list of battles in which you trainers can use QR Rental Teams:

List of battles that allow QR Rental Teams

Furthermore, QR Rental Teams are not permitted at all for official tournaments. So the hopes of moving away from breeding and training for trainers interested in VGC competition is still not entirely possible.

Helpful But Not Entirely Convenient

As with many things TPCI does, QR Rental Teams are a fantastic idea with implementation that leaves much to be desired. In order for a trainer to share their teams, they must register it to their Battle Box. Then the trainer must log into their account on the Pokémon Global Link website. From there they can access the Pokémon teams in their Battle Box and register them as a QR Rental Team.

Example Pokémon QR Rental Team from Pokemon Global Link website

At this point the team is ready to be used by trainers around the world. While you would think in order to use a rental team, you would simply scan a QR code that is shared with you. Sadly it is not that easy. A trainer has to access the Pokémon Global Link website, and locate the team or trainer who owns the team. Once they locate the team they wish to rent, they can generate a personal QR code to be scanned with their Pokémon Sun and Moon game. Not exactly the epitome of convenience.

The other area that needs improvement is the user interface. Rental Teams are separated into only two different formats, Single and Double. This makes hunting down teams for specific things, like VGC format, difficult and time consuming. On top of that, there are very few options for filtering through teams outside of specifying specific Pokémon.

A Hope For the Future and a Word of Caution

Overall, Rental Teams are a fantastic move for TPCI to make. Allowing easier access to trainers to try out the more competitive aspect of Pokémon is certainly a step in the right direction. Hopefully they are able to iron out some of the kinks with the current system and provide more and more convenience to their fans and prospecting competitive trainers.

One word of caution however, there are rumors going around that currently QR codes contain Pokémon trainer ID info that can be maliciously accessed. This data can then be used to get the trainer account attached to the Rental Team banned from the Pokémon Global Link. Please use this new service with caution until more info comes out!

All images courtesy of Game Freak

Follow me on Twitter: @aeroashwind

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