scump optic

Scump and OpTic finally become CoD champs

The drought is over for the Greenwall. Over two years after forming a roster of impeccable skill, the longest standing roster in Call of Duty esports, OpTic Gaming, has finally been crowned a Call of Duty champion.

The Infinite Warfare season was not the greatest this OpTic Gaming roster has experienced, but they were able to finish it in style. With tournament wins at CWL Paris and CWL Dallas, OpTic was on the verge of another dominant season before poor placings in the Global Pro League (GPL) Stage One Playoffs and CWL Anaheim. They picked it up again just in time.

OpTic came into the Call of Duty Championship in Orlando fresh off a GPL Stage Two Playoff victory. That momentum made them a favorite, but not the only one, to win CoD Champs.

Unlike in years past, it was almost impossible to tell which team would emerge victorious. Would it be eUnited, or perhaps FaZe? The teams made high-profile roster swaps in hopes of a big payoff. How about Splyce? The European organization made it to the Grand Finals of CoD Champs on Black Ops III and was considered the best EU team again this year. Or what about Luminosity or Team EnVyUs? Both teams had solid years and were always able to contend with other top teams.

In the end, the Grand Final featured two of the oldest teams in Call of Duty esports: OpTic Gaming vs. Team EnVyUs. A regular ol’ eClassico.

OpTic and nV had played earlier on Championship Sunday in the winner’s bracket final, where nV was able to take a rare Hardpoint map off of OpTic to take the series 3-1. But OpTic surged right back in the loser’s final against Luminosity and the matchup was repeated. This time, OpTic had to defeat nV twice to take the crown. And they did just that.

The win cements OpTic Gaming as one of the greatest Call of Duty teams of all time, right up there with compLexity. Some would even say that with a CoD Champs title under their belt, OpTic has surpassed the old coL roster in that regard. Afterall, they were the team to beat for three years straight. It also helps that both Damon “Karma” Barlow and Ian “Crimsix” Porter were part of the coL dynasty, so essentially they have now surpassed themselves.

OpTic Gaming CoD Champs ring count

No other Call of Duty team collectively has as many CoD Champs rings as OpTic Gaming. They now have seven:

Damon “Karma (or three-rings)” Barlow x 3

Ian “Crimsix” Porter x 2

Seth “Scumpi” Abner 1

Matt “FormaL” Piper x 1

Along with his first Call of Duty Championship win, FormaL is also going home with an MVP award. For OpTic, FormaL has always been a rock with the AR, keeping his team in contention when his teammates are having a bad game. The MVP award adds an additional $25,000 to his winnings from the tournament.

Even though he didn’t win MVP, it’s hard to say anyone deserved the CoD Champs win more than Scump. In player polls, he has consistently been considered the best player in the game. A part of OpTic Gaming since Modern Warfare 3, Scump has been to five CoD Champs with the team. In his first two, he managed to take home third place. In his next two, OpTic settled with seventh place finishes. But now, Scump has finally earned himself a ring. Perhaps more willl come.

Trailing right behind OpTic in CoD Champs in rings is Team EnVyUs, who, with the same roster as last year, returned to the Grand Final looking for a repeat win. If they had been successful, Jordan “Jkap” Kaplan would have been the first to three rings instead of Karma and the team would have nine rings combined.

Now, just two months remain until the release of the next game in the Call of Duty franchise: WWII. The game will put boots back on the ground, a return to traditional gameplay. It’s too early to tell which players will excel and which will fall off, but the next year of Call of Duty esports will be starting off on the right foot.


Josh Billy is a long time Call of Duty fan. You can email him at joshuatbilly@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter.

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Image by Lalo Torres

Frostbite’s DreamHack Atlanta HCS Finals predictions

After seven weeks of competition and one full month of time to prepare for this moment, DreamHack Atlanta is here. Over the course of the next three days, we’ll see the best teams from North America and Europe go at it for their share of $200,000. Let’s take a look at some predictions for the top eight!

7th/8th: Ronin Esports

Roster: Visal “eL ToWn” Mohanan, Cory “Str8 SicK” Sloss, Tyler “Spartan” Ganza, Ayden “Suspector” Hill

Ronin, since the start of the season, has been constantly struggling. Their only win throughout this season was their first match against Str8 Rippin. Halfway through the season, Ronin looked to improve by swapping out Carlos “Cratos” Ayala for eL ToWn. This swap proved unfruitful, as Ronin didn’t win another match for the rest of the Pro League and ended their season by getting reverse-swept by EG.

Ronin’s scrim scores also don’t show a lot of promise due to their inconsistency. They have managed to defeat EG and Splyce, but the next week they were 13-0’d by both Splyce and OpTic Gaming. This will be a tough fight for them, but with their firepower, they should be able to survive relegation.

7th/8th: Luminosity Gaming

Roster: Joe “TriPPPeY” Taylor, Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, Tommy “Saiyan” Wilson, Bradley “APG” Laws

Luminosity, while not having to fight through relegations like Ronin, does not seem to be playing their best Halo leading up to DreamHack. They ended their season 3-4, tied with EG, but due to having a low map win percentage, they only made 6th place. During the roster swap period, LG acquired APG from Str8 in order to bolster their slaying power. DreamHack will decide if this was a good decision or not.

In scrims, LG has at least been performing slightly better than Ronin. However, they have the same issue: inconsistency. Either way, against top four teams, LG hasn’t even had any particularly close scrims. They can snag top six however, assuming EG and OS are not in top shape.

5th/6th: Evil Geniuses

Roster: Jason “Lunchbox” Brown, Justin “Roy” Brown, Josbe “Tapping Buttons” Valadez, Michael “Falcated” Garcia

DreamHack

The key to EG’s success. Image by Josbe Valadez.

Tapping Buttons seems to be just what this squad needed. EG has been struggling since the start of 2016 and this is the best form we’ve seen the squad since since X-Games 2016. They started the Pro League with Brett “Naded” Leonard, but after Daytona, Naded departed and left EG scrambling. With the help of the greatest of all time, Tom “OGRE2” Ryan, the squad got Tapping Buttons. Since then, EG’s season has gone surprisingly well, despite having a 3-4 record. With the exception of getting swept by OpTic, EG’s other losses to Team EnVyUs, Team Liquid and Splyce were all in close five game series.

Scrims, as usual with EG, paint a different picture. This roster has always struggled online, but close games to amateur teams as well as a narrow loss to Str8 Rippin can leave even the most stalwart of fans worried. However, the Brown Twins have a reputation for being LAN gods for a reason and many expect them to remind competitive Halo fans why that is this weekend at DreamHack.

 

4th: Team Liquid

Roster: Braedon “StelluR” Boettcher, Zane “SubZero” Hearon, Aaron “Ace Elam, Kevin “Eco” Smith

DreamHack

Image by Halo Esports Wiki

Liquid had a surprisingly slow start to their Summer Season. They suffered losses to both Luminosity and Splyce, neither of which were close matches. During the mid-season roster transfer period, they surprised the community again by dropping Timothy “Rayne” Tinkler for Str8 Rippin’s Ace. Many questioned the decision, as SubZero had stated previously that he planned to always remain a duo with Rayne, and that this change could imbalance the team’s chemistry. In fact, it had the opposite effect. Liquid returned in the 3rd week to defeat Team EnVyUs 3-1 and were the only team to defeat OpTic all season. They ended their season with a 5-2 record.

Recent scrims show that Liquid’s only losses so far have been to Splyce and OpTic Gaming.

3rd: Splyce

Roster: Jonathan “Renegade” Willette, Jesse “bubu dubu” Moeller, Ryan “Shooter” Sondhi, Anthony “Shotzzy” Cuevas-Castro

If you told someone to put together a squad based solely on slaying ability that wasn’t nV, this is the squad you’d probably get. Even bubu dubu, the most objective-oriented player on this roster, has shown that he has talent in slaying. This squad took most teams by storm during the season and ended 6-1 with their only loss being to OpTic. This squad only narrowly lost to Liquid at Daytona and they’ve only gotten better since then.

Scrims look good for Splyce, with dominating wins over not only Ronin and Luminosity, but also nV. If Splyce and nV meet in the bracket, it could be a toss up, but nV’s experience as a team could be what propels them over Splyce.

2nd: Team EnVyUs

Roster: Justin “iGotUrPistola” Deese, Austin “Mikwen” McCleary, Eric “Snip3down” Wrona, Cuyler “Huke” Garland

The HCS Daytona champions ended their season a bit shy of where they probably would have liked to have been. Their season ended 4-3, with losses to Liquid, Splyce and a reverse-sweep at the hands of a vengeful OpTic Gaming. However, this squad has remained consistent and it takes more than online victories to prove that Splyce or Liquid can take down nV. DreamHack will decide if this team is still OpTic’s biggest contender, or if they’ve fallen by the wayside.

Scrims for nV look relatively normal. Close losses to OpTic, one loss and victory over Splyce and dominant performances over most other teams. However, Snip3down has been having some hand issues, so if he hasn’t properly healed, it could affect the squad’s performance.

1st: OpTic Gaming

Roster: Tony “LethuL” Campbell, Jr, Paul “SnakeBite” Duarte, Mathew “Royal2” Fiorante, Bradley “Frosty” Bergstrom

DreamHack

Image by Turtle Beach.

Is anyone really surprised that OpTic Gaming are the favorites to win? Since forming, they’ve only lost three events, all of which were in long, close series. Liquid may have beaten them online, but have only come remotely close to defeating these juggernauts once. EnVyUs has defeated them on LAN, but they have been inconsistent with their performances against OpTic and have also been blown out of the water several times by this squad.

Scrims are like usual for OpTic. Clean victories nearly across the board, with only a couple close defeats here and there. Make no mistake, OpTic are coming to win DreamHack and add to their already long list of victorious events, and they’re looking to be in perfect shape to do it.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Devin! Get in touch with Devin personally to talk more HCS and see more articles by following him on Twitter @DS_Frostbite!

Header image by Halo Waypoint

 

Season four

Season four changes

Three, two, one, go!

Season four of the Rocket League Championship Series kicks off in just a few short weeks. Registration ends August 8, and open qualifiers begin August 12 and 13 for North America and Europe respectively.

Psyonix announced some important new changes to format and qualification, in regards to season four and five. These changes will make Rocket League, as an esport, more accessible to new and long-time viewers.

If you haven’t seen the changes yet, here’s what is happening with NA and EU and why the changes are important. Psyonix has yet to announce information regarding Oceania.

Rocket League Rival Series

Season four

Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

The Rocket League Rival Series, a second, lower division, makes its debut in season four. This division effectively doubles the number of teams competing. The RLCS and RLRS each feature eight teams per NA and EU regions, raising the total to 32 teams.

Twitch, official partner of the RLCS, will continue to stream RLCS matches on Saturdays and Sundays. RLRS matches will take place on Fridays.

The benefit to fans here should be obvious: more Rocket League for everyone.

Auto-qualification, Promotion/Relegation

Perhaps one of the most difficult things for esports fans to keep up with season to season is rapidly changing team compositions. However, some esports are taking measures to limit or discourage this.

For example, Riot Games is moving away from a promotion/relegation system, opting instead to franchise the North American League of Legends Championship Series. The goal is to have permanent partners in the form of professional gaming organizations.

Season four

Image courtesy of steamcardexchange.net

Psyonix, on the other hand, implemented a promotion relegation system into the season four and five format. Instead of permanent partners, a promotion/relegation system focuses on roster consistency.

Psyonix tested this system in season three, relegating five auto-qualification spots for season four. The top two teams from both NA and EU, after the season three regional championships, auto-qualified for season four. These teams include NRG and Rogue for NA and Flipsid3 Tactics and Mock-It for EU. As the current world champions, Team EnVyUs, formerly Northern Gaming, won the fifth auto-qualification spot.

There are two stipulations for retaining auto-qualification: teams must retain two-thirds of their starting roster and they must abide by league rules. Mock-It lost auto-qualification due to not retaining two-thirds of their starting roster.

In a promotion/relegation format, a team’s organization doesn’t affect their auto-qualification.

The RLCS announced they will be expanding this format in the coming seasons. Here’s how the promotion/relegation system looks moving forward.

RLCS

Twelve season five spots are up for grabs during season four. The six teams that make it to the regional championships in each region auto-qualify for season five.

Four teams in each region will battle for the remaining RLCS slots in a promotion/relegation tournament, set to take place between the regional and world championships. The bottom two teams from the RLCS and the top two teams from the RLRS will compete in a double elimination tournament to determine who qualifies for the remaining RLCS slots in season 5.

RLRS

Four teams in each region will auto-qualify for the RLRS division of season five. The bottom two teams from each region’s promotion/relegation tournament, along with the third and fourth place teams receive auto-qualification.

Benefit

There’s a huge benefit to viewers when it comes to a promotion/relegation format. Teams are encouraged to stick together due to the two-thirds roster requirement for auto-qualification. This allows viewers to truly become fans of teams, knowing that the chance of the team entirely splitting up after the season isn’t as high.

Season four

Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

Along with seeing more stability in top level rosters, we will also have the chance to see the rise of new teams. Four RLRS slots in each region, beginning in season five, go to teams competing in open-qualifiers.

The new format provides some roster stability, while at the same time still offering up and comers an opportunity to break into the professional scene through RLRS open qualifiers.

A franchise system such as the one the NA LCS is working on implementing would be closest to a traditional sport. That being said, the additional stability under the promotion/relegation system should still make Rocket League even more appealing to traditional sports fans than it already is.

We’re one step closer to cementing Rocket League as a top-level esport.

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‘The Problem’: A reflection on the career of Kioshima

The career of Fabien ‘kioshima’ Fey has been quite the rollercoaster. He is a two-time major champion, so his career has been anything but disappointing; however, it has been anything but smooth sailing. While people will say he already peaked, his time with FaZe is showing that the French player is only getting started. Not only is his team performing well but so is he. So let’s take a trip down memory lane to see how this French star got to where he is today.

The up-and-coming

via http://www.epsilon-esports.com

Kioshima had his first huge showing at ESL One Cologne 2014. In this tournament he was key in fueling Richard ‘shox’ Papillion’s Epsilon team to a playoff spot, defeating eventual champions of the tournament, Ninjas in Pyjamas, to do so. He played very well in the tournament, so well in fact that LDLC leader Vincent ‘Happy’ Cervoni thought he deserved a spot on what would become the best team from France.

French domination

While LDLC was not the best team in the world, they had the pride of being the best team from France. A key detail is that Hovik ‘KQLY’ Tovmassian was VAC banned, leaving Titan very vulnerable in terms of firepower. LDLC did not seem to care in the slightest. In their time together as a team, they went between two different orgs and amassed a total of nine tournament wins, including a major. They broke the meta with their infamous force buy rounds. In these rounds, they leveraged their skill, along with dynamite teamwork, to win many rounds. After the famed ‘honeymoon’ period wore off, the poor economic decision making drove the team into the ground, an error Happy would make more than just this once.

Kenny the savior

via HLTV.org

Meanwhile, over in Titan, Kenny ‘kennyS’ Schaub, was fighting extremely hard in every game, dropping thirty-plus kills in order to give his team just the outside chance of winning. He eventually had enough with losing despite monster individual performances. He and Dan ‘apEX’ Madesclaire, swapped places with shox and Edouard ‘SmithZz’ Dubourdeaux. This EnVyUs team would bring kio his second major win, despite that his lack of a consistent role was causing him to suffer in terms of performance. Kenny and apEX carrying let the team ignore their problems, for a little while, until bad results started to pile up.

Outcast

When things started to really hit the fan, the team was left with no choice but to remove the worst performing player. That, unfortunately, was kioshima. Removing him at the time was definitely justified; however, in the coming year, it would become very clear that kio was not ‘the problem’ within EnVyUs. Kio was left without any options for a while, as he was still under contract from EnVyUs. Eventually, he ended up landing with a team known for being dreadful tactically that just leveraged skill. This team was FaZe.

FaZe up

via http://wiki.teamliquid.net

Coming into a FaZe Clan, a team that was trying desperately to build something special, kio was considered a role player. His form did not really improve with the new look; however, he seemed to make the team better, as not many players on the team were willing to play roles. Eventually, the team would add in renowned AWP player Aleksi ‘allu’ Jalli. Following the addition of allu, Finn ‘karrigan’ Andersen, renowned in-game leader, joined forces with FaZe after being removed from Astralis.

A team that was once only capable of group stage upsets was now a contender for playoff spots. FaZe even managed to reach the quarterfinals of the ELEAGUE Major; although, they weren’t happy just being a playoff team. There would be a blockbuster move in the coming months, that would make FaZe a contender for the coveted world-number-one spot. Nikola ‘NiKo’ Kovač had decided to join with none other then FaZe and kioshima after he escaped his mousesports prison.

via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3o7ETjya-Q

After the arrival of karrigan, kio’s individual form was on the up and up. It made an enormous spike after the arrival of Bosnia’s finest, NiKo. He was now more than just some role player, he was creating massive impact for his team, helping lead his team to four consecutive finals, and two tournament wins.

He is currently playing the best Counter-Strike of his career, and FaZe is a legitimate contender for the upcoming PGL major. ‘The Problem’ is anything but in this FaZe team, and things are only looking up for kio.


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Featured image via HTLV.org

Possible EU season four rosters

We’re back with more potential Rocket League rosters you may see showing up to compete in season four of the Rocket League Championship Series. This time we’ll be focusing on Europe.

There are certainly many potential teams we may see coming up in season four. That being said, this guide is focused on potential teams containing players who competed in season three.

If you missed it, you can check out the predictions for NA rosters here.

RLCS season three contenders

Season four will be the first time Rocket League fans will see auto-qualified teams competing in league play. Where North America has two auto-qualified teams, three teams from Europe earned auto-qualification. Although that means one fewer league play slot for EU, there are some stipulations. One team has already lost their auto-qualification, opening up that slot back up.

Along with the auto-qualified RLCS veterans, there will surely be other teams with season three veterans showing up as well.

Auto-qualification was granted to the top two teams in NA and EU during the regional championships of season three. A fifth auto-qualification spot was up for grabs by the team crowned world champions, assuming they weren’t already auto-qualified.

Since the season three world champions, Northern Gaming, didn’t place in the top two during the regional championships, three teams from EU auto-qualified for season four: Northern Gaming, Flipsid3 Tactics and Mock-It eSports EU.

Northern Gaming/Team EnVyUs

This is another team that has competed in all three seasons of the RLCS. Under the name We Dem Girlz, the initial roster consisted of Remco “Remkoe” den Boer, Nicolai “Maestro” Bang and Marius “gReazymeister” Ranheim. This squad was acquired by Northern Gaming during the first season. They came in third at the season one world championships.

Image courtesy of teamenvyus.com

 

Between season one and two, gReazymeister left Northern Gaming and David “Miztik” Lawrie joined the team. Again, Northern gaming placed third at the season two World Championships.

By season three, David “Deevo” Morrow replaced Miztik as Northern Gaming’s third roster member. Maestro was unable to attend the season three World Championships, and Pierre “Turbopolsa” Silfver subbed in. The team was finally able to break past third place, becoming the season three World Champions.

Since the end of season three, Remkoe, Maestro and Deevo left Northern Gaming and joined Team EnVyUs. This suggests that there are no plans to change rosters.

Flipsid3 Tactics

 

Flisid3 Tactics left to right: Kuxir97, gReazymeister, Markydooda. Photo courtesy of rocketleague.com

Another veteran team of the RLCS, Flipsid3 Tactics has had only one roster change since season one.

 

The initial Flipsid3 Tactics roster consisted of Mark “Markydooda” Exton, Francesco “Kuxir97” Cinquemani and Michael “M1k3Rules” Costello. After season one, M1k3Rules left Flipsid3 Tactics to take a break from competitive Rocket League and gReazymeister joined the roster, making up the current roster.

This roster was crowned season two world champions and placed in the fifth-sixth during the season three world champions.

Since season three of the RLCS, Flipsid3 Tactics took first place at DreamHack Summer 2017 in Sweden and doesn’t appear to be planning any roster changes.

Mock-It EU

While the Mock-It organization has been a part of all three seasons of the RLCS, they have had drastically different rosters each season. Season three’s roster consisted of all new players from the previous seasons, including Miztik, Courant “Kaydop” Aledandre and Victor “Fairy Peak” Locquet.

Despite placing first in the season three regional championships and second at the season three World Championships, it appears that Mock-It will be the only team to lose their auto-qualification for season four. Kaydop left Mock-It to join Gale Force eSports, alongside Turbopolsa and Jos “ViolentPanda” van Meurs.

While it is uncertain what team Miztik will be playing for, if any, he is no longer a part of the Mock-It roster. The new roster consists of Fairy Peak, Philip “paschy90” Paschmeyer and Sandro “FreaKii” Holzwarth.

Xedec Nation/Cow Nose

Originally qualifying under the organization Xedec Nation, this team quickly left to reform their Cow Nose. In a Twitlonger, the Xedec Nation manager of the team explained the reason for their departure.

The roster consisted of Niels “Nielskoek” Kok, Hampus “Zensuz” Öberg and Danny “DanzhizzLe” Smol. As of now, it appears that Nielskoek and Zensuz will remain on team Cow Nose. DanzhizzLe, on the other hand, announced his departure from Cow Nose with a Twitlonger shortly after the run at season three of the RLCS came to an end.

The Cow Nose Twitter account lists the team members as “@NielskoekRL, @ZensuzRL and …” suggesting they haven’t locked down a third roster member. As for DanzhizzLe, it seems he has not made any announcements about a future team.

Pocket Aces/Gale Force eSports

Pocket Aces showed up to season three of the RLCS with a strong roster. The team consisted of paschy90, ViolentPanda and Thibault “Chausette45” Grzesiak. During the season they were acquired by Gale Force.

As mentioned above, Mock-It and Gale Force have done a bit of player shuffling since the end of season three. Kaydop left Mock-It, despite having auto-qualification to team up with ViolentPanda on Gale Force. Gale Force later announced the addition of Turbopolsa as their third. On the other hand, paschy90 moved from Gale Force to Mock-It to team up with Fairy Peak and FreaKii. Chausette45’s Twitter name is currently “Chausette45 LFT,” or looking for team.

The Leftovers

The Leftovers left to right: Sikii, Ferra, Snaski. Photo courtesy of twitch.tv

As their name implies, The Leftovers teamed up at the last minute because they weren’t on teams already. Despite that fact, they went on to take third in regionals and fourth at the world championships.

The Leftovers main roster consists of Nicolai “Snaski” Vistesen Andersen, Alexander “Sikii” Karelin and Victor “Ferra” Francal. So far, it does not appear that The Leftovers will be making roster changes.

PENTA Sports

Although PENTA placed 10 in qualifiers, falling short of league play by two slots, they made it to league play on a technicality. The team consisted of FreaKii, Kasper “Pwndx” Nielsen and Danilo “Killerno7”  Silletta.

Initially, ZentoX secured eighth league play slot, however they were disqualified due to Amine “Itachi” Benayachi’s ineligibility. PENTA went on to win a round-robin tournament in order to secure that spot.

After FreaKii made the move to Mock-It, Killerno7 and Pwndx decided to disband. Both Pwndx and Killerno7‘s Twitter accounts list them as looking for a team.

Secrecy/Resonant Esports

Beginning as Secrecy, they were picked up by Resonant during season three. The roster consists of Otto “Metsanauris” Kaipiainen, Joonas “Mognus” Salo and Linus “al0t” Möllegren.

While the roster hasn’t changed, the team name has. After season three they left Resonant and created Element. Shortly after, Element was acquired by Method.

Moving forward

There seems to be some more certainty with potential EU rosters compared to NA ones. There are some players who are LFT, such as Killerno7, Pwndx and Chausette45. That being said, there quite a few rosters which seem to be locked down already.

What other teams do you expect to see in season four of the RLCS? Drop a comment below and let us know.

Tentative/Potential season four teams (with season three contenders)

  • EnVyUs: Remkoe, Maestro, Deevo
  • Flipsid3 Tactics: Kuxir97, Markydooda, gReazymeister
  • Gale Force: ViolentPanda, Kaydop, Turbopolsa
  • The Leftovers: Snaski, Sikii, Ferra
  • Method: Metsanauris, Mognus, al0t
  • Mock-It: Fairy Peak, paschy90, FreaKii

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Ex6TenZ: A mastermind’s fall from grace

Kévin ‘Ex6TenZ’ Droolans helped define the early metagame of Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. He is a legend of the game and a tactical genius. Love him or hate him, you have to respect him; however, in recent days he has found himself in a position where his dream of winning a major looks impossible. Today I’ll reflect on his illustrious career, and look forward to where he could be going.

The Source Days

via http://blightgaming.com

Many people may not know this, but Ex6TenZ was considered by many to be the best Source AWP player of all time. He was not an in-game leader during most of his time in CS:S. He played for VeryGames for the majority of his CS:S career, easily the best Source team of all time, that included Source legends like Richard ‘shox’ Papillon, and Cédric ‘RpK’ Guipouy. This team dominated all of the competition for the major part of Counter-Strike: Source – from 2008-2012 the team amassed a total of 25 finals appearances, with 22 tournament wins. They were a model of consistency and showed why they deserved to be talked about today as the greatest of all time.

A few months after the official release of CS:GO, Source was completely defunded, as most organizers from the scene were more interested in the new game. Source players were forced to adapt to the new game, while most 1.6 players rode the game to its bitter end.

The Rivalry

via https://www.gfinity.net

VeryGames was the second best team in the world for the first year – only Ninjas in Pyjamas was better. Any tournament where the Swedes and the Frenchmen were on opposite sides of the bracket, they met in the final. They surpassed every other team by far. The Ninjas came out victorious nearly every time, until around the time the first CS:GO major rolled around. The Frenchmen would finally surpass their Swedish counterparts to take the number one spot in the world rankings; however, it was not all smooth sailing from there.

The Upset

VeryGames was poised to win Dreamhack Winter 2013. Fnatic awaited them in the final, which would have been an easy win for them. All they had to do was beat their rivals from Sweden one more time. The Ninjas were too much for them, however. VeryGames took their exit in the semifinals, and while Ex6TenZ couldn’t have known it, that would be the closest he would get to winning that elusive major title.

The Titan Era

via https://www.hltv.org/

The organization VeryGames dissolved, and Titan was there to steal the loot. After ESL One Cologne, where Dan ‘apEX’ Madesclaire and Hovik ‘KQLY’ Tovmassian put on an incredible showing, a French shuffle. Vincent ‘Happy’ Cervantes’ LDLC, who had more success at the major acquired Nathan ‘NBK’ Schmitt, and  ‘SmtihZz’  from Titan. They also sniped shox and Fabien ‘kioshima’ Fey, from Epsilon. Titan acquired apEX and KQLY from LDLC. A team that would’ve most likely been the best in France, and possibly even outshone Fnatic during their era. This was cut excruciatingly short by the infamous VAC ban of KQLY.

Titan until about July of 2015 was hovering around the 5-8th spot in the world. On July 15, 2015, apEX and Kenny ‘kennyS’ Schraub, left Titan for Team EnVyUs. This was the start of a slide that would take Ex6TenZ to his lowest point.

The new Titan roster was shox, RpK, Mathieu ‘Maniac’ Quiquerez, Ex6TenZ, and SmithZz. Titan the organization made a massive buyout of Adil ‘ScreaM’ Benrlitom to replace Maniac. This roster was for a long time considered to be the ‘guardian’ of the top 10 in the world rankings. If you could beat Titan, you were most likely a top 10 team.

The G2 Mishap

Gamers2, after selling their old roster to FaZe Clan, picked up the ex-Titan team that was left without an organization after Titan folded for economic reasons. After two months, Ex6TenZ was oddly removed for the up and coming Alexandre ‘bodyy’ Pianaro. It was likely due to inner-team turmoil with shoxie, but there was never any official reason given.

The mastermind was left with a tier three team, in shambles. LDLC lost both of their best players, bodyy and Timothée ‘DEVIL’ Démolon. Ex6TenZ was left out to dry, on a team of lower tier players. Things are on the uptrend; however, as Ex6TenZ just received some help in the form of DEVIL. Who knows, maybe Ex6TenZ will take his revenge one day.


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Featured image via HLTV.org

Beyond the Sticks: Return of the Gauntlet

Earlier last week, Millennial Esports announced the return of a time-honored Halo tradition. Beyond the Sticks will allow Team EnVyUs and Oxygen Supremacy to have a pre-tournament boot camp, almost like in the legendary days of the LAN Network. Both teams will descend upon Las Vegas to compete in four, 13 game series to prepare for Dreamhack Atlanta. Let’s take a look at how Beyond the Sticks will play out.

Overview

Beyond the Sticks will start on July 1st with two, 13 game scrimmages. The next two matches will be on July 2nd. The full schedule can be found here. The event will be commentated by Tom “TSquared” Taylor and Ryan “Towey” Towey. With one of Halo’s most dominant players and one of it’s best coaches, these two will be able to provide valuable insight on what each of the teams is focusing on in each game. Speaking of the teams…

The Match-Up

Mikwen has easily been nV’s MVP lately, Image by Halo Esports Wikis.

Team EnVyUs is one of the most talented teams in Halo at the moment. Consisting of Justin “iGotUrPistola” Deese, Austin “Mikwen” McCleary, Eric “Snip3down” Wrona, Cuyler “Huke” Garland, this squad took the title at UMG Daytona. With a mix of veterans as well as young blood, this squad has been one of the only teams that could contend with OpTic Gaming. They will absolutely be a threat going into the Summer Finals, as OpTic only narrowly defeated them when they met during the Pro League. Despite ending the league at 4-3, nV has shown that when it comes to LAN, they always show up.

Oxygen Supremacy is a team nobody saw coming. Ryan “RyaNoob” Geddes, Troy

Ryan and his legendary hair. Image by Halo Esports Wikis.

“DasTroyed” Dusman, Cody “ContrA” Szczodrowski and Kyle “Nemassist” Kubina have stunned even some of the pro teams. At Daytona, this squad ended up in the top six after dominating teams like Luminosity Gaming and Str8 Rippin. They also came within one game of send EnVyUs home in the loser’s bracket finals, despite forming just before the event. Ryanoob once again has put together a squad that can contend with the “pros” and yet is not in the Pro League. OS has taken first in three out of four online qualifiers so far and it hasn’t been particularly close.

Scrims between these two teams tell a different story. The first scrim ended 5-8 in favor of nV, with 3-4 games being close toss-ups. The second scrim, however, was a blowout. Victory again went to nV, with a crushing 13-0 defeat of OS and all but one game were not even close. Events change circumstances, however. This will be a live event, so it’s reasonable to assume 343 will provide a closed server, which feels very close to LAN. In this environment, OS has shown that they’re more than capable of defeating the Daytona champs.

What’s the Big Deal?

These boot camps are pulled straight out of Halo’s history. These gauntlets allowed teams to put in the grueling hours of practice needed to perform well at events. They also allowed newer players to show their capabilities prior to events. Beyond the Sticks is hopefully the start of this kind of thing returning. It can be the start to grassroots, community-run LANs being a mainstay for competitive Halo once again.

Be sure to check out all 52 games of carnage at twitch.tv/millennialesports

 

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Devin! Get in touch with Devin personally to talk more HCS and see more articles by following him on Twitter @DS_Frostbite!

Header image by Millennial Esports.

Summer 2017 over/under (part 2): LCS players above expectations

With three weeks of NA and EU LCS in the books, audiences are starting to get a feel for teams’ strengths and weaknesses. Some squads have carried over similar strengths from Spring Split. Others have risen or fallen in performance. But even within rosters that tend to play consistently, there always seems to be an ebb and flow on the individual player level.

Last week, I highlighted players who need to return to past form for their respective teams to have a chance at peak performance. This week it is all about the other side, summoners who are trending upward so far this summer. These players have visibly improved. They are putting up statistics that are exciting and surprising. More importantly, though, these members have elevated their teams’ overall performances with their gameplay on the Rift.

Darshan “Darshan” Upadhyaha

CLG, Top laner

KP%:    61.8%   (2nd top laner)

D%:        19%    (4th top laner)

Darshan is a player who has come and gone as a presence in the top lane. While he almost mirrors his statistics from Spring Split, Summer Split seems different. Many of the imported top laners who struggled to find their place last split currently feel much stronger. Yet, Darshan has been able to keep up enough in lane to help CLG pressure the map through split-pushing and cleaner Teleports. Darshan’s team will rely on him to anchor his lane against top-heavy teams in the NA LCS.

CLG Darshan is exceeding expectations in top lane

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

DIG Shrimp is exceeding expectations in the jungle

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

Lee “Shrimp” Byeong-hoon

Dignitas, Jungler

KP%:    79.1%   (2nd overall)

XPD@10:    325  (3rd overall)

Dignitas’ newest jungler, Shrimp, has been on a tear so far this split. He and top laner, Kim “Ssumday” Chan-ho, are the only members of the team to start ahead of their opponents at 10 minutes. Despite Dignitas’ early deficits, Shrimp has enabled the team to control Elder Dragon and Baron better than most teams in the NA LCS. His Lee Sin is particularly strong.

Choi “Pirean” Jun-Sik

Team Envy, Mid laner

KDA:    4.2   (4th mid laner)

DPM:    494  (6th mid laner)

Pirean is by no means close to the best mid laner in the NA LCS. However, his addition to Team Envy has seemed to boost their overall performance. Within the team, Pirean has the highest KDA, lowest death share, and ties Apollo “Apollo” Price in damage share. Even in Envy’s losses, the mid laner looks proactive on picks like Taliyah and Ahri. Pirean seems like a much better fit than Noh “Ninja” Geon-woo in spring.

NV Pirean is performing above expectations in mid lane

LoL Esports Flickr

UOL Samux is exceeding expectations in bottom lane

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

Samuel “Samux” Fernández Fort

Unicorns of Love, Bot laner

DPM:    604   (4th overall)

DMG%: 28%  (6th overall)

Despite already meshing well with Unicorns of Love in his rookie split, Samux is solidifying himself as a top AD carry in EU LCS this split. He is putting out high damage and keeping his deaths low, sporting a 7.7 KDA. Samux’s positioning and decision-making have been crucial to Unicorns’ scary team-fighting. Standing out this way among a strong field of European bot lanes truly is a feat.

Kim “Wadid” Bae-in

Roccat, Support

D%:   15.4%  (2nd support)

KP%:  68.5%  (6th support)

The flashiest Rakan player in the EU LCS, Wadid has been a primary initiator for Roccat this split. This trend started during Roccat’s win streak towards the end of Spring Split, but he has blossomed these past few weeks. Wadid enables his bottom lane partner, Petter “Hjärnan” Freyschuss, to get ahead during laning phase and clean up team-fights. Viewers feel this player’s presence on the map, which is impressive considering there are several competitive, veteran support players in the league.

ROC Wadid is exceeding expectations as support

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

honorable mention

IMT Cody Sun and Olleh are above expectations in bottom lane

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

Li “Cody Sun” Yu Sun, Kim “Olleh” Joo-sung

Immortals, Bot lane duo

DPM: 534,251 (2nd bot lane duo)

FB%: 27%,20% (1st bot laner, 1st support)

The success of Immortals’ bottom lane is difficult to separate between marksman and support. Both Cody Sun and Olleh have exhibited vast improvements from their starts at IEM Gyeonggi. Many fans could see the power shift towards the end of Spring Split, but not to the current degree. This duo has consistently pressured opponents throughout the game in laning, turrets and team-fights. Olleh’s aggressive Bard and Morgana pairs particularly well with Cody Sun’s Caitlyn and Varus. Immortals’ bottom lane has been a force so far, and remaining at the top of the standings will definitely depend on their continued growth.

All of these players are playing above their previous benchmarks. It only takes a short time for above expectations to turn into the expectation, and, as the NA and EU LCS advance, viewers will look for continued improvement. No one will necessarily remember which teams and players were stomping or slumping three weeks into the split. If these players truly want to leave their mark, they will need to maintain this high level of gameplay over many more grueling weeks of League of Legends.


Featured Image: LoL Esports Flickr

Champion Statistics: Oracle’s Elixir

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Week 4 Day 1 HCS Pro League Predictions

As the Summer Season of the HCS Pro League enters its final stretch, Week 4 begins Wednesday night. This week has several make-or-break matches, the most important of which will likely decide the top dog going into DreamHack Atlanta: OpTic Gaming vs Splyce.

Str8 Rippin vs Luminosity Gaming

Saiyan has been the spine of LG thus far. Image by Tommy Wilson.

LG (Assumed): Bradley “APG” Laws, Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, Joe “TriPPPeY” Taylor, Tommy “Saiyan” Wilson

Str8 (Assumed): Tim “Rayne” Tinkler, Hamza “Commonly” Abbaali, Richie “Heinz” Heinz, Dan “Danoxide” Terlizzi

LG has done well to improve their standings recently with victories over Ronin and Liquid. Unfortunately, the team was disqualified due to a roster miscommunication last week against OpTic, but that was likely to be a 3-0 anyways. Going into Week 4, LG has a good chance to further improve their standings and tie their win/loss ratio at 3-3. Str8 Rippin has been struggling and the past roster changes may have only weakened them further.

Meanwhile, this is a must-win for Str8. They’re already nearly guaranteed to be at the bottom of the bracket going into Atlanta and they will need to put the pieces together fast to avoid relegation. Str8 currently sits at 0-5. They will need to beat both LG and EnVy in order to even have a chance at improving their standing. It doesn’t look good for them.

Prediction: Luminosity Gaming 3-1 Str8 Rippin

Fantasy Picks (Fantasy HCS): Saiyan, TriPPPey, APG

 

Team EnVyUs vs Ronin Esports

Mikwen has been leading his team through the season and is looking to close out strong. Image by Halo Esports Wiki.

nV: Justin “iGotUrPistola” Deese, Austin “Mikwen” McCleary, Eric “Snip3down” Wrona, Cuyler “Huke” Garland

RE: Visal “eL ToWn” Mohanan, Cory “Str8 SicK” Sloss, Tyler “Spartan” Ganza and Ayden “Suspector” Hill

For nV, the Pro League thus far has contained a few unexpected defeats. That said, they’re looking to rebound against Ronin in Week 4 and have a decent chance of doing so. Despite sitting at 2-3, tied with EG and LG, nV still sits in a good spot due to their win at Daytona. On top of that, their scrim results have been improving, with impressive victories not only over Team Liquid but OpTic Gaming as well.

Ronin, on the other hand, is in a bad spot. Despite picking up eL ToWn, they haven’t been looking particularly great. Being that they’re sitting at 1-4 in the league, that’s not a great sign. While scrims have shown a little promise, this squad has continued to get dominated. Along with Str8, they’re looking like an easy team to relegate.

Prediction: Team EnVyUs 3-0 Ronin Esports

Fantasy Picks (Fantasy HCS): Mikwen, Snip3down, Huke

 

Team Liquid vs Evil Geniuses

TL: Zane “SubZero” Hearon, Braedon “StelluR” Boettcher, Aaron “Ace” Elam,  Kevin “Eco” Smith

Justin “Roy” Brown. Image by Halo Esports Wiki.

EG: Justin “Roy” Brown, Jason “Lunchbox” Brown, Michael “Falcated” Garcia, Josbe “Tapping Buttons” Valadez

Since trading Rayne for Ace, Liquid has seen some improvement. The team went 2-0 last week and improved their overall standing to 3-2. They currently are sitting in third, behind Splyce and OpTic. Scrims have shown a tie between Liquid and Oxygen Supremacy but the squad was dominated 2-9 by EnVy.

EG, on the other hand, is running into their usual problem: lack of practice. With nail-biting, game five losses to both Splyce and Team EnVyUs, the potential of this squad is apparent. This is the best EG has looked since X-Games 2016. Over the past week, they have shown a bit more consistency in scrims, despite both of their match-ups being losses. If the EG that nearly took down Splyce shows up, we could have a great series on our hands.

Prediction: Evil Geniuses 3-2 Team Liquid

Fantasy Picks (Fantasy HCS): StelluR, Eco, Tapping Buttons

 

Splyce vs OpTic Gaming

Shotzzy and Renegade have been the tip of the spear for Splyce. Image by Halo Waypoint.

SPY: Jesse “bubu dubu” Moeller, Ryan “Shooter” Sondhi, Jonathan “Renegade” Willette and Anthony “Shotzzy” Cuevas-Castro

OG: Tony “LethuL” Campbell, Jr, Paul “SnakeBite” Duarte, Mathew “Royal2” Fiorante, Bradley “Frosty” Bergstrom

This match is big. Both of these teams are tied for 1st place in the league with a 5-0 record. This match will likely decide which team takes the first seed into Atlanta.

Splyce has had a few close calls. They only narrowly beat out EnVy and EG but have shown that their firepower is not to be trifled with. However, Splyce hasn’t even scrimmaged over the past week. That lack of practice may not allow this series to be as close as many want.

OpTic continues to avenge their Daytona loss through the league. They have appeared unstoppable, with only nV coming close to beating them. In fact, their only scrim loss was to nV and that can be chalked up to just a bad day.

However, if Splyce shows up and plays well, this series gets a lot closer, possibly even becoming a coin-toss.

Prediction: OpTic Gaming 3-1 Splyce

Fantasy Picks (Fantasy HCS): Anyone from OpTic. Maybe Renegade or Shotzzy.

Week 4 is huge for everyone, as seeds will begin to be set in stone. Do you disagree with any of the predictions? What matches do you think will be close and be the best to watch? Be sure to participate in the discussion!

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Devin! Get in touch with Devin personally to talk more HCS and see more articles by following him on Twitter @DS_Frostbite!

Header image by ESL Halo.

 

 

HCS mid-season roster changes

At the end of Week Two of the HCS Summer Season, the first of two transfer periods opened up. Before long, rumors were abound and the community sought for scraps of news. With the second transfer period coming up, let’s recap some of the roster changes that have happened as well as what we can expect.

Str8 Rippin

Str8 Rippin has had the most changes, with both Aaron “Ace” Elam and Bradley “APG” Laws reportedly departing the roster. In lieu of these two players, Str8 acquired Timothy “Rayne” Tinkler from Team Liquid and played their matches this week with Hamza “Commonly” Abbaali. The Str8 roster will now likely be Rayne, Commonly, Richie “Heinz” Heinz and Dan “Danoxide” Terlizzi.

This change is somewhat confusing. Str8 has lost a lot of slaying power from APG as well as losing out on overall damage output and aggressiveness due to Ace leaving. Despite this, they have picked up two very objective-minded players. While Commonly is relatively similar to Ace in terms of objective plays and damage output, Rayne does not compensate for the slaying ability lost. Combined with Heinz already being another objective-focused player and that leaves Danoxide with more pressure to slay.

Team Liquid

Team Liquid has made a trade with Str8 Rippin, gaining Ace in return for Rayne. The Liquid roster is now Ace, Zane “Penguin” Hearon,  Braedon “StelluR” Boettcher and Kevin “Eco” Smith.

This roster change may not have necessarily improved or worsened Liquid to any significant extent. While Ace does perhaps bring some more damage output to the team on paper, he also lacks the chemistry that Rayne had with the roster. This will likely leave Liquid in a similar spot to what they would have been in if they had kept Rayne.

Ronin Esports

Ronin has dropped the most controversial player in the HCS, Carlos “Cratos” Ayala for Visal “eL ToWn” Mohanan. The roster is now eL ToWn, Cory “Str8 SicK” Sloss, Tyler “Spartan” Ganza and Ayden “Suspector” Hill.

Similarly to Str8, this seems like only a slight upgrade. eL ToWn does fill the same support role as Cratos did, with only slightly better slaying ability. However, eL ToWn still struggles in his individual gunfights. His strongest asset to the team will likely be his already well-developed chemistry with Spartan, but Ronin will likely remain at the bottom of the rankings for the duration of the season.

Luminosity Gaming

In a surprise move, it is expected that Luminosity will be dropping Cameron “Victory X” Thorlakson in order to pick up APG. APG has already stated multiple times on stream that he intends to leave Str8 and the LG is looking to pick him up. The roster will now presumably be APG, Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, Joe “TriPPPeY” Taylor and Tommy “Saiyan” Wilson. All the while, rumors of retirement are swirling around Victory X.

This change could go either way. APG adds more slaying power to the team but now nobody on the roster is especially objective focused. If the squad can compensate for this by over-slaying and having the other players adapt, then this could help LG. If not, Luminosity could slip back down the ladder to join Ronin and Str8 Rippin. Victory X and Ninja also were a proven duo, so chemistry and play-style clashes could also come back to bite LG.

How do you feel about these changes? What teams do you think will improve? Which will worsen? Be sure to share your opinions!

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Devin! Get in touch with Devin personally to talk more HCS and see more articles by following him on Twitter @DS_Frostbite!

Header image by ESL Halo.

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