Catching Pokérus – The Cure to Slow Training

A Different Kind of Flu

Pokerus tag

The Pokémon franchise contains a multitude of ways to train your Pokémon and get them ready for battle. Though time-consuming, there are certain tools to speed up the training process. One such tool is the Pokémon virus, or Pokérus.

Like so many things concerning competitive Pokémon, Pokérus is mostly shrouded in secrecy. In the games it is only indicated with a tag next to the Pokémon’s name. You may even have an infected Pokémon in your PC box and not even know it.

Catching the Virus

Nurse joy giving the pokerus news

Introduced into the series with Generation two, Pokérus is mostly shrouded in mystery. However, unlike many virus’s in our world, this virus is beneficial to those it infects.

A Pokémon who has contracted Pokérus will experiance increased Effort Value gain while training. Because of this, competitive Trainers seek to get their hands on an infected Pokémon so that they can spread it to others they wish to train.

Getting an infected Pokémon yourself is not easy though. A Trainer has about a 1/21,900 chance to actually encounter an infect Pokémon in the wild. So you are more likely to find a shiny Pokémon, than one infected by the Pokémon virus.

Fear not though, most Trainers turn to the Pokémon Global Link in order to obtain Pokérus. Once obtained the virus can be transferred between the Trainers Pokémon, as well as placed in stasis by putting an infected Pokémon in PC Storage.

Life After Pokérus

 

Pokemon Bagon with PokérusSo now that you have a Pokémon with Pokérus, you can pass it to that young Larvitar you plan on EV training. Simply place the infected Pokémon into your party next to the target Larvitar and go battle. After each battle their is a chance for the virus to spread to adjacent Pokémon.

Now that Larvitar has Pokérus, you can head to your favorite EV training ground. EVs gained while infected by the Pokémon virus are doubled. Now Larvitar can power through that training session.

Combine Pokérus with power items for an even more dramatic effect. Using these methods, EV training can be reduced to a fraction of the time it generally takes.

Final Thoughts

Secret tools do not mix well in a competitive environment. While cool from a role-playing perspective, things like Pokérus really only serve to hurt the competitive community.

Competitive Trainers and the Pokémon community as a whole would benefit Game Freak would open up when it comes to matters concerning competitive battling. Making it more accessible to more trainers is only a good thing for the franchise.

All images courtesy Game Freak

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Pokemon VGC’s Championship Point Dilemma

Recently, there have been a number of players voicing their opinions on the current championship point structure and what it could mean for the future of Pokemon VGC.

A Rundown of the Problem

The current championship point (CP) requirement for Worlds qualification in the two major regions (United States and Europe) is 500. The remaining regions of Latin America, Asia Pacific, and South Africa require 350 points.

With the adjusted tournament structure now offering smaller CP payouts for placings beyond top 16, best finish limits set in place, and limits to the frequency of local tournaments, The Pokemon Company (TPCi) has quite a problem to fix.

The current structure caters heavily to high-level players who can afford to travel, which isn’t ideal for the game’s growth. With the bar at 500 CP to qualify for Worlds and fewer ways to earn those points, there is less incentive for new players to compete. Basically, it’s extremely hard to qualify for Worlds if you are a less-experienced player who can’t afford to travel to higher CP events.

Perhaps a solution would be to lower the Worlds’ CP bar to 350 or 400 with the current CP payouts as a way to properly scale how much CP is awarded at each tournament level. This way, there’s incentive to attend local tournaments which could translate to higher attendance at larger ones. This could make Worlds qualification more accessible, which would allow top players to shift their focus to making it further in the tournament.

However, some would say lowering the bar would make Worlds too easy to qualify for. This was an issue in 2016 when local tournaments could be “farmed” for CP, which made higher level tournaments seem less significant. However, it also made the scene much more accessible for local players, which is obviously great for the game’s potential growth.

See the problem here?

We either have tournaments that appeal to top performing players and “wallet warriors”, or we lower the CP bar making Worlds an easier tournament to qualify for.

Now that there’s a general outline of the problem, let’s dive into some specific topics that players have brought up regarding the issue.

International Championships and the Best Finish Limit

With the best finish limit for Internationals set at four, the mentality of “quantity over quality” is very applicable if a player is able travel and perform well. With top players in each region receiving stipends to travel to each country’s Internationals, it makes it too easy to flood these tournaments with players from regions that already have enough tournaments to qualify for Worlds.

On the other hand, if TPCi restricts the best finish limit to one and limits incentive to travel, one or two bad finishes for a top player could end their season.

Regional Favoritism

It’s obvious that North America is the region with the best treatment in Pokemon VGC. The US has the most tournaments and most coverage over any region in the circuit, which explains the large number of American players at Worlds.

More US players receive stipends, allowing them to travel to and dominate tournaments overseas. The more developed scene makes community-organized tournaments possible to award a travel award to the winner.

Of course, countries like Japan need an improved qualification structure, buts that’s been an issue since the beginning.

The Return of the LCQ?

The Last Chance Qualifier (LCQ) was a tournament held the day before Worlds as an opportunity for non-invited players to play for a chance to compete at the main event.

No one is certain why the LCQ was discontinued, as it was an incentive for non-invitees to attend Worlds. Not to mention, it also produced a World Champion in the Seniors division in 2013.

It was popular among the community, which gives it even less of a reason to be absent from Worlds. With the recent attendance restrictions at the 2016 World Championships and now the Sao Paulo Internationals, you’d think TPCi is deliberately trying to make their tournaments smaller.

Final Thoughts

What we should take away from this is that no tournament structure is going to please everyone. The championship point structure is crucial to every aspect of Pokemon VGC’s tournament structure including maintaining the player base. If you don’t appeal to new players, the game won’t grow, but if you disappoint the veterans, people will leave.

TPCi has some big questions to answer when deciding how to handle their 2018 season. There’s no clear solution, but there’s a lot that needs improvement.

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Play pokemon vgc logo

Three Interesting Stats Halfway Through the 2017 Pokémon VGC Season

A Plethora of Pokémon

Half way through the season and one thing is certain, no meta has developed. Having completed nine events so far, VGC 17 has yet to see a single team reign supreme. Due to this, some 25 Pokémon have found their niche and appeared on the winner’s pedestal during the course of these nine events.

Pokemon who have placed first vgc 2017

Though no core of Pokémon has risen to dominance yet, one core has seen more play than any other. The AFK core, consisting of Arcanine, Tapu Fini, and Kartana, has been popular; but thus far it has only finished first in one out of nine major events, piloted to victory by the great Markus Stadter during the Dreamhack Regionals in Germany.

World Class Trainers

Even though there are still four months to go until the Pokémon VGC World Championship, 23 Trainers have already qualified for an invitation.

VGC 2017 Pokemon Standings

These are the trainers lucky enough to have earned enough Championship Points for an invitation so far. Will one of these 23 be the very best? Only time will tell.

Trainers still have time considering there are still two International Championships, as well as a plethora of Regionals and other smaller events to go. Names like Aaron “Cybertron” Zheng, and Gary Qian, still have time to claim an invite.

Going Against the Grain

2017 is the year of the Tapu and Ultra Beast. Introduced in Pokémon Sun and Moon, these creatures are incredibly powerful. It is no surprise then, that they have appeared on every winning team of a major VGC tournament. Every winning team except for two.

Image of Gavin Michaels

Gavin Michaels Second from the left | Image courtesy of @komvgc

Those two teams belonged to the same Trainer, Gavin Michaels. Gavin was able to claim victory in both California Regionals during the winter matches. Winning both tournaments without use of either a Tapu or an Ultra Beast. Truly a feat to watch.

All images courtesy of Game Freak

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Defending the Land Down Under: VGC 2017 Melbourne International Championships Recap

That’s a wrap from Melbourne, and what a great tournament it was. Zoe Lou, a rather unfamiliar face to the big stage, was able to take her home country’s tournament, overcoming a stacked Top 8. Zoe’s historic win makes her the first Australian player to win an International, and the first female Master to win a National-level tournament since 2011.

Results & Teams (Top 8 Cut)

1) Zoe Lou

2) https://i1.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/italyflag.png?resize=32%2C32Nico Davide Cognetta

*

3) ukflagBen Kyriakou

4) Luke Curtale

Alola Form

5) argentinaflagSebastian Escalante

6)usflagNick Naverre

7) usflagTommy Cooleen

Alola Form

8) germanyflagBaris Akcos

Alola Form

*Nico’s Kartana was removed due to a team sheet error

Pokémon Sprite Images courtesy of Game Freak

If It Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix ItImage result for drifblim

Zoe’s team was heavily inspired by former World Champion and ONOG Invitational Champion, Shoma Honami’s
famous Tapu Lele and Drifblim combination. This combo takes advantage of Drifblim’s Unburden ability, which doubles its speed when it doesn’t have an item. Since Drifblim consumes its Psychic Seed after Tapu Lele hits the field, Drifblim can set up a quick Tailwind.

Zoe’s tournament run may have hit a rough patch in Day 2 Swiss, but her Day 1 and Top Cut performances wereImage result for tapu lele nothing short of dominant. Zoe finished 8-1 in Day 1 and barely managed to squeeze into the Top Cut as the 8th seed. From there, Zoe won by a forfeit in Top 8, but proved herself in her Top 4 match against Ben Kyriakou, and her Finals match against London International Finalist, Nico Davide Cognetta. Although Cognetta was playing with only five Pokemon due to a team sheet issue, Zoe proved she won this match by playing exceptionally in her 2-0 sweep, and she had a number of fans to cheer her on.

Five Pokemon? No Problem.Image result for kartana

After losing his Kartana due to the same team sheet woes that plagued players in London, Nico managed to take his weakened team all the way to the finals. Nico had already proved himself as a skilled player after his run to the finals in London, but his skill could only propel him so far. Kartana would’ve been invaluable for handling Zoe’s nearly unchecked Magnezone, as Nico’s Arcanine had issues with Zoe’s Garchomp and Gyarados. Despite Nico’s success, this got players talking again about how unfairly harsh these team sheet rulings were, and how they should be reformed in the future.

Streamed From An iPhone

image courtesy of @BillaVGC on Twitter

Honestly, the community was the real MVP of the weekend.

With permission from The Pokémon Company, a phone was provided to commentators Ty Power (@SarkastikVGC) and Tom Schultz (@SchultzyVGC) who actually dropped from the competition to commentate the last-minute stream. There was even live coverage from PokemonAustralia.com who live tweeted the event, with assistance from other members of the Australian Pokémon community. A huge shout out to everyone who helped to provide coverage as you have made our jobs as spectators and journalists a lot easier.

 

Final Thoughts

Melbourne was an event filled with story lines that turned out to be a great overall tournament experience. With Melbourne behind us, we set our sights on São Paulo, Brazil for the next International Championships that have shrouded themselves in controversy due to the newly announced player caps. Now that Europe and Australia have crowned players who have successfully defended their continents, let’s see if Latin America can do the same.

Art of Pokémon courtesy of Pokémon and Ken Sugimori

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A Magnezone Mirror Match Finale! – VGC 2017 Sheffield Regional Championships Recap

Our second piece of Pokemon VGC regional coverage comes from Sheffield, UK. Like Collinsville in the US, it was given an official Pokémon stream. The exciting Top Cut came down to a Spanish mirror match between Alex Gomez and Albert Bos who featured identical unique teams. Getting to see this team go against itself made for a great final set. Before we break it down, let’s see the rest of the teams from Sheffield’s Top Cut.

Results & Teams (Top 8 Cut)

1. Albert Bos

2. Alex Gomez

3. Javier Senorena

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4. Daniel Nolan

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/750.png

5. Daniel Oztekin

6. Rob Akershoek

Alola Formhttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/778.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/143.png

7. Alessio Yuri Boschetto

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/630.png

8. Andrea Ciccone

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Finals Mirror Match: The Breakdown

Here’s a link to watch the Finals.

Slow Mode

Anyone who watched Game 1 of this set saw how little Nihilego was able to accomplish in the face of the slower and bulkier Pokémon. Games 2 & 3 concentrated mainly on the slow aspect of the team, with both players leaving Nihilego and Tapu Bulu on the bench. Trick Room wasn’t used nearly as much as one would expect, seeing both of these teams; but the theme of this match was positioning, and Trick Room was a clutch aspect for setting up Araquanid.

Positioning: Competing Substitutes, Intimidate, and Trick Room

Arcanine Image result for arcanine

Arcanine’s main purpose in this set was to Intimidate the opposing Arcanine so that Magnezone was able to safely set up a Substitute. The Arcanine, assuming they were similar, were built more for support rather than offense. Alex’s used Helping Hand to assist his Magnezone, and both utilized Snarl to weaken each other’s Magnezone.

Magnezone Image result for magnezone

Magnezone getting up Substitute was a primary objective for both players in the early game. In Game 1, Alex showed how important this was to the match-up. Albert adjusted and was able to use this strategy to take the next two games. Although Magnezone being behind a Substitute seemed like a huge advantage for either player, Arcanine’s Snarl was a factor in complicating this strategy (as Snarl is able to bypass Substitute).

Araquanid Cleaning UpImage result for araquanid png

In the first two games, Araquanid didn’t really make an impact. However, Game 3 was able to show how much of a threat it was. There was a moment where Alex’s Porygon2 set up Trick Room to which Albert’s Araquanid took complete advantage of. After scoring a huge Hydro Vortex on Alex’s Porygon2 upon switch-in, Albert’s Araquanid was in position to easily clean up the rest of Alex’s team after having the Trick Room set up.

The Niche Picks

Since the meta game has kind of leveled, here’s an abbreviated entry to The Niche Picks.

Alolan PersianImage result for alolan persian png

Everyone’s least favorite Alolan form made its way into a regional Top Cut again. This time, it’s thanks to Rob Akershoek, who we saw three times on stream. Rob’s team was built to support Snorlax, which Persian is able to do nicely with access to moves like Fake Out, Parting Shot, and Snarl to weaken the opponent’s team and boost Snorlax’s bulk. Persian is also a bit defensive with access to the Fur Coat ability, so players using Persian usually opt for a 50% HP healing berry to increase its time on the field.

Tapu Bulu Image result for tapu bulu png

Tapu Bulu finally won a tournament, which could mean a potential comeback for the forgotten deity. It does well against its Tapu brethren, as it can interrupt opposing Terrain while also having a type advantage against Tapu Fini. There’s also a smaller amount of Poison-type moves in the meta game now that Garchomp have forgone Posion Jab. However Tapu Bulu still struggles with the popular Arcanine. Alex and Albert’s Trick Room-based team could be a good fit for Tapu Bulu, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see future Top Cuts consistently have all four Tapus present.

Final Thoughts

It was nice to see another non-US Pokemon VGC regional have an official stream, and Sheffield did not disappoint. The European meta can be rather unique which is evident by the team that managed to make it to the finals twice. We have another action-packed weekend coming up in Melbourne for the 2017 season’s second International Championship. It should be an exciting tournament with a ton of big names to look out for, but make sure to check back here for a full recap of the action! Thanks for reading!

Art of Pokemon courtesy of Pokémon and Ken Sugimori

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Pokemon togedemaru steals the show

Pokémon VGC 2017 Collinsville Regional Wraps Up – Alex Underhill Takes First, Togedemaru Steals Show

Farewell Collinsville

Competition wrapped up this weekend at the Pokémon VGC Collinsville Regional tournament, and fans were not disappointed. Around 300 Trainers showed up for their chance at walking away with $3,000 cash, and Championship Points towards entrance to the World Championship. While many Trainers competed, only one proved he had what it took to be a champion. Alex Underhill marveled the crowd as he battled his way to his first major VGC victory.

Alex Underhill using Togedemaru to win Collinsville regionals Pokemon

Image courtesy of @LexiconVGC

Alex combined offensive pressure from Gyarados and Arcanine, with Celesteela’s stalling ability. To top it off, Alex’s centerpiece was his Togedemaru, a little steel mouse capable of unnerving foes with its shocking tactics. Throughout the entirety of the tournament, Alex impressed the crowd with the expert use of his Togedemaru. Whether it was faking out opposing Tapu Koko, or Encoring Kartana into repetitive sword dancing. Alex was nothing short of fun to watch.

Togedemaru Wasn’t the Only Interesting Trend

Pokémon Togedemaru

Image courtesy of Game Freak

Togedemaru may have Zing Zapped his way into the fan’s hearts with his shocking display, but there was another interesting trend occurring. Teams running Tapu Lele and Drifblim were on full display in Collinsville this weekend. In fact, four of the top ten teams ran the combo. If this sounds familiar, it should be. This is because Tapu Lele and Drifblim are the pair Shoma used to claim victory in the recent ONOG Pokémon Invitational.

Watching the impact Shoma’s play had on many of the Trainers was an interesting thing to see. Even the second place finisher, Justin Berns, was using Tapu Fini and Drifblim. However, the disruption caused by Togedemaru’s antics just proved too much to overcome. After three full rounds, Justin found himself yielding victory to Alex when the final match came down to Snorlax versus Celesteela.

See You Down Under

melbourne australia for pokemon international

Image courtesy of Australia.com

The next major Pokémon VGC event will be the International Championship in Melbourne Australia. This will be the second in a series of four tournaments in the brand new International Championship Series. With a massive Championship point payout and open admittance to all Trainers worldwide, International Championship Series tournaments promise to bring a large crowd of talented Pokémon Trainers.

Scheduled to begin March 10th, the tournament will run until March 12th. Make sure to keep an eye out for new strategies. Will Porygon2 still be a staple? Could Togedemaru be a surprise VIP? Maybe Evoboost Eevee will take the cake. If nothing else, the VGC 2017 season certainly has been dynamic. See you in Melbourne!

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Bold Predictions: Who Will Take ONOG’s Pokémon Invitational?

One Nation of Gamers Pokémon Invitational tournament is happening this weekend, and the hype has reached its peak. Picking a potential winner from such a small pool of top-level players in a game like Pokémon, is insanely difficult. So, I’ve narrowed down my Top three players that I think will take the tournament, based on overall skill and performance in the 2017 format. In no particular order, here they are:

Sejun Park

While Sejun has remained rather quiet in the last two years, outside of the Trading Card Game, he looks poised to come back strong in this tournament. Since winning Worlds back in 2014, Sejun hasn’t made headlines in VGC until this year. His 2017 accomplishments include a win at a large Korean grassroots tournament and his top placing on the Battle Spot Ladder with Tapu Fini. Sejun was one of the early pioneers of Tapu Fini, which is one of the most popular Pokémon in the format right now. This is why I think Sejun will shine when his opportunity comes.

When Sejun enjoys a format, he is a threat. Not to mention, this format hugely rewards innovation, and innovation might as well be Sejun’s middle name. In his interview with Trainer Tower, Sejun explained he,”like(s) the regulations and there [are] many people who support me. And it is fun! It is fun to play this meta!”

Regardless of what kind of team Sejun brings, standard or weird, I would expect nothing less but a plethora of new tricks from our former World Champion.

Aaron Zheng

Aaron has been in the scene for as long as it has been a thing, and he consistently shows promise to put up a big performance. After starting the season a bit sluggish after missing Day 2 at the London International Championships, Aaron came back in full force with two Top Cut appearances in San Jose and Anaheim. Although he still has yet to win an official tournament this season, he’s coming off of a huge win in the stacked Melbourne Invitational, which also guarantees him an appearance at the Melbourne International Championships in March.

Aaron has high hopes for Pokémon’s growth as a result of this tournament, and I think that will motivate a big performance from Zheng. In his own interview with Trainer Tower, Zheng had this to say about the tournament:

“For this [One Nation of Gamers] tournament, I’m actually really excited because it’s a huge opportunity. I don’t think people realize how huge this really is… Having an organization that does full-time esports come in and help us… is something that is really great… I’ve never seen a grassroots event or tournament organized as well as this, so I have high expectations for this weekend’s competition. And I think it’s really good, because VGC is something where no one really has the time to dedicate to content creation full-time, or writing articles full-time or streaming full time. So being able to get the help of a professional company that has experience in this is really, really big. I think this is honestly a huge step forward.”

Markus Stadter

In traditional fashion, I’m placing my top choice at the end. Markus is one of the top players in Europe, hailing from Germany where he recently claimed his first regional title of the season. Markus’ knowledge of the game (this format especially) is high, and it shows in his play as well as his team building. He was one of the first players to give Mandibuzz a name in VGC 2017, while also helping to popularize Snorlax. On the same team.

After Leipzig Regionals, Markus became very interested in the growth of Pokémon VGC into an esport. In his interview with Trainer Tower, Stadter said, “There’s always been change, and a lot of people still have the goal of ‘getting Pokémon to the next level,’ ‘growing the game’ or ‘becoming esports,’”

“But I want to give it a final try now. I had resigned before and thought Pokémon was ultimately only going to be a fun thing on the side. However, I’m motivated now and want the scene to prosper. There’s still some boundaries we need to cross, but I think it might be possible. I don’t think we’ve ever been this close before.”

Markus’ drive to push Pokémon to the next level serves as powerful motivation for him to do well. Not to mention, he has the capability to make exceptional meta game calls, and capitalize with exceptional skill in best-of-three. The current third best player in the world is my pick to win it all.

 

Images courtesy of Trainer Tower

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Slow and Steady Wins Another Race – VGC 2017 Anaheim Regional Championships Recap

Gavin Michaels, VGC 2017’s King of Trick Room, takes his second regional title in a dominating fashion. Over the course of the entire tournament, consisting of nine best-of-three Swiss Rounds and a Top 16 cut, Gavin only dropped a single game in his conquest of Anaheim. Not to mention, his team was nearly identical to the team that won him San Jose Regionals just a few months prior. We’ll break down Gavin’s team, but first let’s look at what managed to reach Top 16.

Results & Teams (Top 16 Cut)

1. Gavin Michaels

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/778.png

2. James Eakes

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/758.png

3. Kamran Jahadi

Alola Formhttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/778.png

4. Raghav Malaviya

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/426.png

5. Tyler Bennett

6. Riley Factura

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/630.png

7. Giovanni Costa

8. Anthony Jiminez

Alola Form

9. Aaron Zheng

Alola Form

10. Nelson Ocampo

Alola FormEast Sea

11. Shreyas Radhakrishna

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/778.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/750.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/149.png

12. Alicia Martinez

13. Jirawiwat Thitasiri

Alola Formhttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/750.png

14. Sam Johnson

15. Alia Lee

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/794.png

16. Gary Qian

https://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/330.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www.trainertower.com/wp-content/uploads/pokedexminisprites/198.png

Pokémon Sprite Images courtesy of Game Freak

Gavin’s Trick Room: The Breakdown

To put it simply: Gavin’s team is entirely reliant on setting up Trick Room, and sweeping with strong sweepers. The unique traits of having two setters, a Fighting-type, and Magnezone allow for Gavin to pretty much ensure that the dimensions are twisted and damage will be plenty. But let’s break down the individual aspects of the team.

The Trick Room Setters

This team features the combo of Porygon2 and the less common Mimikyu (which actually might Image result for porygon2start to grow in popularity) as the team’s primary Trick Room users.
Porygon2 is about as standard of a Pokémon as you can get, but Gavin’s Porygon2 favored more physical Defense with special attacks like Thunderbolt being favored over Return.

Mimikyu on the other hand is a little bit more interesting. Gavin’s Mimikyu is fully Image result for mimikyu pnginvested in Speed and Attack, which is beyond unusual for a Pokémon who sets Trick Room. But Mimikyu has other utility with moves like Taunt and Destiny Bond which it can take advantage of with its higher Speed. Ghostium Z is the item of choice, with Mimikyu being able to fire off a Never-Ending Nightmare into opposing Tapu Lele (*which it will out-speed by the way). A trick we saw in the finals was Z-Destiny Bond, which redirects attacks to Mimikyu with the added effect of Destiny Bond. This strategy was used to get rid of James Eakes’ Gigalith which was crucial in eliminating James’ only Trick Room answer.

HariyamaImage result for hariyama

Hariyama is commonly seen alongside Trick Room modes as a Fake Out user to assist
its partner in setting up Trick Room. Gavin basically invented standard Hariyama with Flame Orb + Guts being used to transition Hariyama’s role to a sweeper under Trick Room. Hariyama is brilliantly supported by Mimikyu, which can eliminate Tapu Lele, which can cancel out Fake Out due to the Psychic Terrain (also Tapu Lele can easily OHKO Hariyama, so there’s that).

The Sweepers

MagnezoneImage result for magnezone png

A grossly underrated Steel-type Pokémon in the format that has only been used successfully by Gavin and Wolfe Glick. Magnezone is a powerful sweeper if given the speed advantage, and with Gavin equipping his with Choice Specs, Magnezone is primed to decimate unprepared teams. With its Magnet Pull ability, Magnezone can trap other Steel-types, like Celesteela and Kartana, making it easier to dispose of them if they’re major threats.

AraquanidImage result for araquanid png

Fun Fact: Did you know that teams featuring both Porygon2 and Araquanid have won all four 2017 regionals so far? It’s a strong combo that can’t be beaten easily.

Araquanid is a Pokémon that has died down a bit in usage, but still manages to snag high placings at tournaments. Under Trick Room, Araquanid is an unstoppable force that can easily just click Liquidation and chunk everything it hits. Gavin’s Araquanid featured some interesting move options in Lunge and Substitute, making it more offensive in favor of the more popular Leech Life and Wide Guard variants.

SnorlaxImage result for snorlax png

A familiar Pokémon to most, but a new one to Gavin’s team, Snorlax replaced Drampa in this new iteration. Snorlax traditionally likes Trick Room and also likes to boost with Curse, so it’s the absolute slowest, tank-iest, and threatening thing once Trick Room goes up.

Now a new combination that Gavin put to very good use is Belly Drum Snorlax next to Mimikyu. The HP sacrifice is zero issue for Snorlax as Gluttony allows it to recover all of that HP with a Figy (Aguav, Wiki, etc.) Berry. Mimikyu can easily set up Trick Room and Snorlax proceeds to annihilate you with maximum strength. I would strongly advise you to have a way to stop this combination if you’re playing at a best-of-one tournament.

May or may not be speaking from personal experience…

Celesteela’s ComebackImage result for celesteela png

This was the first time Celesteela topped Kartana in usage at a Regional or higher tournament since San Jose all the way back in December. We saw a couple Celesteela variants with some being Special attackers and some going back to the classic Leech Seed strategy; but the defining move of Celesteela now is Flamethrower.

With Flamethrower, Celesteela easily beats Kartana. I don’t think Kartana will drop in usage, but I expect that Celesteela and Kartana will be evenly represented in coming tournaments.

What’s New With Eevee?Image result for eevee png

Giovanni Costa managed to make another Top Cut appearance with his now famous (or infamous even) Eevee team. There was a different team member that replaced Gengar on this new version of Giovanni’s team: Tapu Lele. Unfortunately, we never got to see Giovanni featured on stream, I can speculate what Tapu Lele could’ve been useful for.

Tapu Lele, like all of the other Tapu’s, gets access to Psych Up, which enables it to be able to copy the Evoboosts from one of its teammates. Since Tapu Lele’s Psychic Terrain boosts the power of Psychic-type attacks, Tapu Lele could be a more efficient sweeper than Tapu Fini. Psychic Terrain also helps block priority moves aimed at Eevee or any of Giovanni’s other Pokémon.

The Niche Picks 

The current meta game appears to be settling, but Anaheim brought a fair amount of odd choices that managed to do well.

SalazzleImage result for salazzle png

*For anyone looking to use a Focus Sash on Salazzle (like James Eakes), I would definitely recommend not running it next to a Sand Stream Gigalith.

With the introduction of Pokémon to Sun and Moon, Salazzle gained access to Fake Out through breeding, which made it much more viable. Salazzle has a great offensive typing, being able to hit the ever present Steel and Fairy-types. Encore was the fourth move choice from James, which effectively punished Protects, which Salazzle is great in baiting out due to its high Speed.

DrifblimImage result for drifblim png

Honestly, one of the last Pokémon I would’ve expected to see in a tournament at all. Drifblim is by far one of the most unique options for a Tailwind supporter, having access to Unburden, allowing it to double its Speed without an item. Raghav Malaviya used a Misty Seed Drifblim which took advantage of Unburden after the usage of Misty Seed thanks to Tapu Fini. Raghav’s Drifblim had access to Swagger which it could use on his own Garchomp in the Misty Terrain to boost Garchomp’s Attack without the drawback of confusion. With Tailwind becoming increasingly more popular, I anticipate we’ll see Drifblim again soon.

TalonflameImage result for talonflame png

Keeping with the theme of Tailwind, Talonflame managed to break into Top Cut and have about 30 seconds of stream time before being knocked out. Despite the insane nerf to Gale Wings, Talonflame is still a fast Tailwind setter that can still fill an attacking or support role.

MurkrowImage result for murkrow png

Another Tailwind user, but Mukrow functions a bit differently than most. Being the only Prankster Tailwind user, other than Whimsicott, Murkrow has an arsenal of useful support moves that Gary Qian was able to use effectively. On Gary’s Murkrow, we saw Quash (which can put a stop to even the speediest of opponents), Taunt (stops supporters in their tracks), Foul Play (standard Dark-type STAB), and Tailwind. While Murkrow is certainly an odd choice, it can definitely catch opponents off-guard with its multitude of tricks.

XurkitreeImage result for xurkitree png

Another unique Ultra Beast to have success in a major tournament, Xurkitree shocked the competition under Jirawiwat Thitasiri. During Xurkitree’s brief stream appearance, we saw Gigavolt Havoc secure victory for Jirawiwat, indicating a rather unusual item choice. At this point you can expect any Ultra Beasts to do well at major tournaments.

FlygonImage result for flygon png

To round out this section, I would like to touch on Flygon, which absolutely fascinates me in this format. Unfortunately, Flygon’s stream appearance was brief and we never really saw it do anything in Gary Qian’s Top 16 match. I have no idea where to begin with Flygon, but Gary has promised a short team report, so I’ll update this piece with some of my analysis when he finally publishes it.

*Edit: You can read about Gary’s Flygon and the rest of his team here!: linkis.com/wordpress.com/LsMuS

Final Thoughts

Nugget Bridge came back strong with a great stream of Anaheim Regionals, featuring excellent commentary from Gabby Snyder, Adam Dorricott, and Duy Ha. Gavin’s victory in Anaheim guarantees him a trip back in August for the 2017 World Championships, which could be a promising tournament for him. Foreshadowing perhaps? Our next set of Regionals are coming up on March 4th in Collinsville, IL, and over in Europe in Sheffield, UK. Check back to The Game Haus for recaps of both of these tournaments along with other great Pokémon articles! Thanks for reading!

Art of Pokemon courtesy of Pokémon and Ken Sugimori

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ONOG’s Pokémon Invitational Is Monumental for the Growth of VGC

“To celebrate the recent resurgence of Pokémon, ONOG, in collaboration with GEICO Gaming, would like to invite you to witness a tournament between the best and most storied Pokémon video game players of this generation.”

One Nation of Gamers in association with GEICO Gaming presents a Pokémon Invitational tournament featuring eight of some of the best players in the world, with a sizable amount of prize money on the line. The tournament will take place over two days (February 25th-26th) and will be multi-stage, double elimination format. The tournament has already generated a lot of positive feedback from the community, as there a large potential for Pokémon VGC’s growth.

Who Ya Got?

Courtesy of ONOG

The eight players that will be competing include the past three World Champions: Wolfe “Wolfey” Glick, Shoma “SHADEviera” Honami, and Sejun Park. It also includes players and popular YouTubers: Markus “13Yoshi37” Stadter, Enosh “Human” Shachar, Aaron “Cybertron” Zheng, Alex Ogloza, and Dan “aDrive” Clap.

The cast of players featured ensures that the level of competition will be high. It seems that every single match will be a feature. With this many well-known players going up against each other, the viewership is sure to be on par with official tournament streams.

What’s On the Line?

There are no Championship Points or trips to Worlds up for grabs. Rather, a $1000 prize pool will be distributed among the top four.

Not Your Traditional Format

The tournament will be structured in two stages: A group stage that is double elimination where players will play best-of-three matches, and a playoff stage that will be single elimination with best-of-five matches. This new approach to the traditional VGC tournament structure is sure to shake things up. It may further mitigate chances of a set coming down to RNG too.

Where Can I Watch the Tournament?

Each match from the tournament will be live on ONOG’s Twitch and YouTube channels. Justin Carris, a newer yet polished commentator, will be leading the match commentary with competitors coming on to assist him.

Why This is a Huge Deal

This is the first independent Pokémon VGC tournament with this big of a sponsor since APEX in 2014. Esports organizations like ONOG and GEICO Gaming bring promise for others to set their eyes on Pokémon as a game that has potential to rise to the level of other major esports. The prize pool, as well as the caliber of players, legitimizes a high level of competitive play that spectators will be excited to watch. The potential viewership numbers makes this tournament sure to attract a ton of attention to the game. Hopefully more of these tournaments are on the way, as this one is sure to set a stellar example.

Final Words

This tournament has a ton of well deserved hype surrounding it. The matches will be exciting, the tournament will be well covered, and the potential growth for VGC is almost certain. In partnership with Trainer Tower, profiles for each player will be posted throughout the week. For more details about the tournament, visit the official site at: http://pokemon.onog.gg/, and get hyped for February 25th!

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QR Rental Teams – A New Way to Play Competitive Pokémon

A New Challenger Approaches

Capturing, Breeding, Training, there has always been a lot of monotony to preparing for a competitive Pokémon match. Trainers spend countless hours picking Pokémon for their team, and working on training the perfect specimen. Each time a trainer chooses to replace even a single member, they must go through the process again. Not anymore with QR Rental Teams.

QR Rental Team scan prompt in game

TPCI has added the option to bypass breeding and training with the introduction of QR Rental Teams. QR Rental Teams allow trainers to register teams they train and share them with other trainers. Has TPCI finally removed the need for breeding and training in competitive Pokémon altogether?

QR Provides First Steps Towards Convenience 

QR codes now grant trainers easy access to battle with teams they put no work into. Simply access teams of Pokémon on the Pokémon Global Link website and generate a QR code for the team. Then scan the generated QR code when prompted in Pokémon Sun and Moon and BOOM, you are battling with a team bred and trained by another trainer.

It has never been easier to practice and battle with some excellent Pokémon teams. QR Rental Teams are not without their restrictions, however. Here is a list of battles in which you trainers can use QR Rental Teams:

List of battles that allow QR Rental Teams

Furthermore, QR Rental Teams are not permitted at all for official tournaments. So the hopes of moving away from breeding and training for trainers interested in VGC competition is still not entirely possible.

Helpful But Not Entirely Convenient

As with many things TPCI does, QR Rental Teams are a fantastic idea with implementation that leaves much to be desired. In order for a trainer to share their teams, they must register it to their Battle Box. Then the trainer must log into their account on the Pokémon Global Link website. From there they can access the Pokémon teams in their Battle Box and register them as a QR Rental Team.

Example Pokémon QR Rental Team from Pokemon Global Link website

At this point the team is ready to be used by trainers around the world. While you would think in order to use a rental team, you would simply scan a QR code that is shared with you. Sadly it is not that easy. A trainer has to access the Pokémon Global Link website, and locate the team or trainer who owns the team. Once they locate the team they wish to rent, they can generate a personal QR code to be scanned with their Pokémon Sun and Moon game. Not exactly the epitome of convenience.

The other area that needs improvement is the user interface. Rental Teams are separated into only two different formats, Single and Double. This makes hunting down teams for specific things, like VGC format, difficult and time consuming. On top of that, there are very few options for filtering through teams outside of specifying specific Pokémon.

A Hope For the Future and a Word of Caution

Overall, Rental Teams are a fantastic move for TPCI to make. Allowing easier access to trainers to try out the more competitive aspect of Pokémon is certainly a step in the right direction. Hopefully they are able to iron out some of the kinks with the current system and provide more and more convenience to their fans and prospecting competitive trainers.

One word of caution however, there are rumors going around that currently QR codes contain Pokémon trainer ID info that can be maliciously accessed. This data can then be used to get the trainer account attached to the Rental Team banned from the Pokémon Global Link. Please use this new service with caution until more info comes out!

All images courtesy of Game Freak

Follow me on Twitter: @aeroashwind

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