Everything that’s been going on with the KeSPA investigation so far

Currently, the Korean Esports Association is appearing in the news along with allegations of bribery and embezzlement. Three people have been arrested and one person has been charged. One name that is most commonly seen is former President of KeSPA and former political aide to the president of South Korea, Jun Byung Hun. The reason why is related to his time as President of the organization. It should be noted that during his tenure he was also seated on the nation’s broadcasting and communications committee. Here are all the details that we currently know about what is going on.

Korean Esports association

KeSPA was created in order to overwatch the esports scene in South Korea and to make it an official sporting event. This was created after receiving approval from the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism back in 2000. It was their job to make sure that esports became a more professional sport, one way was by making sure players were getting paid a competitive salary compared to traditional sports.

They were also known for stepping in when allegations of match-fixing were found to be true in the StarCraft scene, or when teams such as Longzhu Gaming allegedly failed to pay past players. They were at one point part of the Korean Olympic Committee where they pushed for esports to be part of the Olympics. After October they were no longer considered an official member due to several new rules put in place.

The allegations

Back in 2015 Lotte Homeshopping, the largest department store in South Korea, sent a payment of $300,000 to KeSPA right before the company went to renew its broadcasting license. The money was allegedly removed by two aides under Jun then family members of the former chairman started receiving large amounts of shopping vouchers from Lotte Homeshopping. The renewal process ended up failing in 2016 when it was found that Lotte Homeshopping had falsified information, this led to their chief being arrested and sentenced to 18 months in prison. News of the payment to KeSPA did not spread until this year of November when KeSPA offices were raided by police forces.

The second allegation towards Jun was levied by Yeo Myung-Sook, the director of the games rating broad, who alleged that Jun was the “root of the corruption.” This allegation is related to the fact that Jun had major pull in the game industry and was criticized for not doing enough to regulate microtransactions, despite other elected officials voicing their concern. Now recurring payments by four major companies to KeSPA during the time Jun served are being looked up to see if there was anything illegal.

What next

Right now the prosecution office has issued an arrest warrant for Jun and the public will most likely to see him stand trial. Corruption is a big deal in South Korea to the point that they got rid of their last President for it. Most of the charges are stemming from the first allegation, but the public shouldn’t be shocked if more comes to light and more people are arrested.

For KeSPA, everything relating to sponsorships will be gone through with a fine tooth comb such as the second season of the KeSPA cup which was sponsored by Lotte Homeshopping. This shouldn’t negatively impact esports too much other than the fact that the scene is losing someone who championed it to be considered more serious. Esports has seen scandal from match-fixing to issues with money before and this in honestly will not be the last time.

 

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How Dreamhack highlighted the ever growing gulf between NA and EU

How we got here

The big story in competitive Smite throughout Season 4 has been competition. There have been two aspects in regard to competition. Firstly, competition has grown incredibly within the regions. Seed one through six are all capable of taking games off each other now in both regions. What is possibly the bigger story is that NA have fallen off a cliff competitively when it comes to LANs.

In every other season NA has been able to compete at the highest level. Admittedly NRG have been top dogs for the last two years, but between the rest of EU and NA there has not been much difference. However, at the very end of Season 3 things started to change. EU sent only two teams to SWC after not performing all that well at the preceding LAN. However, EU dominance started to show there as both EU teams went to the final. This was even more impressive as at the time Obey were not respected as the team they are now. The second team in EU was OrbitGG who didn’t go to SWC due to poor performances at the preceding LAN.

It was at the Gauntlet though and Smite Masters where we really learned just how big the gap had grown between the two regions. It was dominant from EU just putting NA to the sword. Nothing epitomised this more than the way in which Rival handled Soar (now SpaceStationGaming).

Where we are at now

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Image courtesy of neogaf.com

EU was known to be stronger than NA; however there was hope that the gap would shrink. Day one of Dreamhack Valencia put such vain hopes to rest. In the three sets between NA and EU only one game went to NA. What was more telling was the way in which EU won. It was brutal, NA were made to look like one of the minor regions. 4th seed in EU, Team Rival, absolutely took SSG, the first seed from NA, to pieces. The way in which that happened makes me confident that Eanix, EU’s 5th seed, has a better chance of winning SWC than any team in NA.

Why?

NA have little success in Moba’s. In pretty much all Moba’s NA are significantly behind the rest of the competition. A few theories are banded around but I don’t put a huge amount of stock in any of them.

Firstly, you hear that ego hinders NA teams; they think they are all better than they are, don’t play for the team and big egos clash. This doesn’t make any sense to me for so many reasons. I mean is John ‘Barracuda’ Salter’s ego getting in the way of LG competing internationally? I think not. You occasionally hear that NA doesn’t take competitive gaming seriously and conventional sports are much more popular. EU is no different, conventional sports are far and away dominant over esports. Most people don’t really know about competitive gaming as a thing. I honestly couldn’t give you the reason, but it is a trend which is hard to ignore.

How?

More focused on Smite I can’t tell you the core problem, but I do have some ideas as to symptoms of the issue. The big thing here that everyone notices is how much more objective focused EU are than NA. I think one of the best ways in which we have been shown at Dreamhack so far is through mid lanes and supports.

The first time this is apparent is in the Rival vs SSG set. Game 2 was won through objective control. The Ra pick by rival was huge. Firstly, it takes away one of Andrew ‘Andinster’ Woodward’s favourite picks. Secondly, it gives you a great ultimate for objective secure. Then SSG backed themselves into a corner with the Hades pick. They had zero objective secure. Up to 20 minutes the game was close but Rival were behind in kills, but had three Gold Furies.

Take away those Gold Furies and SSG are in a dominant position in the game instead of slightly behind. Their objective play was just sloppy as a whole that game though. When they lost a Gold Fury because five people backed at the same time, it was infuriating. This is something that has been known since the game was in open beta. I mean this is not EU playing amazingly but NA playing pretty poorly. Rival were also taking Gold Furies in the face of SSG. This is because of their dominant objective secure.

Look at game number one in the NRG vs Dignitas set. Dig have a Sol in the mid lane and NRG had a Vulcan. While Sol’s objective secure is not bad it just can’t compete with a Vulcan. Dignitas recognise this though, so Jeppe ‘Trixtank’ Gylling starts with a HOG.

NA

Image courtesy of smitepedia.com

This allows them to really compete and contest at Gold Furies. It shows the thought that EU are putting into making sure that they don’t fall behind in the objective game. Something NA clearly are not doing at the moment. Notice how he didn’t go HOG when NRG had a Morrigan in the mid lane, showing that this is a thought process based around big mage ults.

NA also seems to be one step behind when it comes to Meta. One way in which this has risen to prominence is how little they value the Sobek. Sobek has been dominant this LAN. Objective wise he is one of the best supports. If you are baiting a Gold Fury he is great as anybody who comes near has to fear the pluck into your entire team. Same goes for anybody trying to contest. You could be one second away from being flung into the entire opposing team.

On top of that he probably has the best ult for securing objectives, with Lurking in the Waters, slowing anybody who comes in, doing huge amounts of damage to players and objectives. For example, when Trix went HOG on Sobek he alone could probably burst the Gold Fury from 30 percent down in a second or so. If you look at the only NA team to win a game, it was when Sinjin ‘Eonic’ Thorpe was playing the Sobek. NRG noticed this though and started banning out the Sobek vs Trix.

What this means for competitive Smite

Nothing good comes from this ever growing divide. Smite competitively is hamstrung in one major regard. We have no serious Asian scene. In particular, Korea does not recognise Smite as a competitive game. Having Korea as a region in a game is beneficial for so many reasons. Korea takes esports more seriously than any other region in the world. For those of you who do not follow any other esports, the best way to describe this is to mention Kespa. That is the government body specifically designed to deal with esports, who even go as far as hosting their own ‘Kespa Cups.’ Korea drag every other region up as they are so professional and take esports so seriously that to keep up everyone must try to emulate. Korea is very invested in their esports scene.

Missing those benefits hurts competitive Smite, but now not having Korea becomes even more of an issue. Only having one region who is competitive will get boring very quickly. If it stays this way, there will be no inter-region competition at LAN’s. Inter-region competition is the most exciting part about big LAN’s. When that disappears, interest in major events falls rapidly.

At the end of the day if NA doesn’t up their game soon everyone suffers.

Top Image courtesy of twitter.com/SmitePro

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