larger than life

Hockey is larger than life

Larger than life by the Backstreet Boys was a top 10 hit in over 14 countries in 1999. It captured the love given to the group by their army of fans and how it propelled the boys to the top of pop music. Hockey captures this same idea and has become a “larger than life” sport.

A self-examination is never done as a kid that puts an emotional investment in question. Your parents typically support your fandom financially. However, there comes a time when you reach a certain age and you contemplate the extent of you as a fan.

The Backstreet Boys were unstoppable from 1999-2002. Their success has kept them with comfortable livelihoods to this day. Although, they have had just one hit in the last 15 years, but have stayed together through 2017. Die hard NHL fans have endured both successful time periods and rebuilds. Their commitment has kept their teams in their hometowns.

Your support benefits you the fan and the players playing the game. Studies indicate those invested in sports have “higher self-esteem and lower depression and stress rates,” (Seattle Times). Everyone’s role is different, but everyone is a part of the team. It’s not “they”, it’s “we.” That makes hockey larger than life.

“Can’t you see, can’t you see” “How your love’s affecting our reality”

larger than life

Photo: The Chronicle Herald

Ten

teams in the NHL have been standing organizations in their respective cities for over 50 years. The league has since become a stream that has generated over four billion dollars in revenue annually. Fans are the direct source for this establishment.

TV rights are the the main source of revenue for the four major sports leagues (football, baseball, basketball and hockey). Sports television programming in the United States is over 127 hours with over 107 million viewers. The NHL is currently in year six of a two billion dollar contract with NBC Sports, and in year four of a 5.2 billion dollar contract with Rogers Communications in Canada. These viewers are fans that make their teams and the league economically successful.

Watching sports in stadium or at home ramps up your emotion levels. Daniel Wann explains how our “blood pressure rises during games” and how our “testosterone plummets after a loss,” (Huffington Post). This range of emotions gives us undeniable empowerment and value just like our support does to our players on our team(s). Our fandom gives us a common language with our peers and boosts our overall sense of well-being. Each livelihood within a team’s community being strengthened makes the simple game of hockey much bigger than the sport itself.

“Every time we’re down, you can make it right”

larger than life

Photo: Pinterest

Teams move to cities when economics are not adding up. It takes commitment, dedication and loyalty to keep a team in your city. Hockey clubs struggle on the ice from time to time and it’s up to the fans to stick with them. Some of the most storied franchises have sustained success in their cities due to their loyal fans.

The Detroit Red Wings have struggled early on in their new home (Little Caesars Arena). However, there is little doubt they will overcome this and find success in due time. The organization had a “Dead Wings Era” of futility for 15 years from 1967-1982. “Hockeytown” stuck together and has won four Stanley Cups since 1982. Detroit is home to 11 Stanley Cups over a storied 91 year period and average 20,027 fans a night, which is the third highest attendance figure in the NHL.

The St. Louis Blues, Washington Capitals and Buffalo Sabres have yet to win a Stanley Cup. However, these three are all in the top 10 in national TV ratings for NBC Sports. Fans in these markets have unwavering hope. It is why these teams have stayed in these cities for 51 (St. Louis) and 47 (D.C. and Buffalo) years. Fans are the life support of their teams, which makes them as a part of the team as anyone.

“That Makes You Larger Than Life”

Hockey brings me to life, and I do my best to give that life back to the game. Avis Favaro reports that “hockey increases heart rates and can cause heart attacks,” (CTV News). That potential risk does not stop avid fans from watching. The benefits from investing in what we cannot control always outweighs the negative.

Over 82 jobs and millions of fans make one NHL organization run on a daily basis in its city. The players playing the game are never the only people involved. There will come a time when one fan will question his/her means to an end within his/her fandom. Always knowing that hockey is larger than life will make the discussion with yourself easier.

 

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“From Our Haus to Yours”

Netting

There is no excuse: Baseball needs to extend protective netting

Todd Fraizer’s reaction says it all. It is simply not worth it.

Frazier was batting in the 5th inning when he yanked a ball foul and the ball proceeded to strike a young girl. Play was put on hold for a few moments while the young fan was tended. Many of the Yankees and Twins players knelt with anguished looks of concern and dread. This is not something that needs to happen.

Manfred is reluctant to enforce his authority

Netting

Rob Manfred is not doing enough to ensure fan safety (CBS Sports)

In an interview with the New York Daily News, Rob Manfred stated, “I think the reluctance to do it on a league-wide basis only relates to the difficulty of having a single rule that fits 30 stadiums that obviously are not designed the same way”.

This blatant disregard for safety demonstrates the problems that the league is facing right now. Is the safety of the fans that pay to watch these teams not worth a slightly obscured view? With all of the money that baseball teams put into their stadiums, is it really not worth it to extend the netting past the dugout so there is no risk of a young girl getting struck by a 100 mph baseball?

Anytime you go to a baseball game you will see and hear the stadium warning fans to pay attention when the ball is in play, which is fair. However, a disclaimer on the back of a ticket doesn’t absolve the team from moral responsibility for protecting their fans. There was nothing that could have been done for that little girl to avoid that ball.

There are 10 teams in the major leagues that have realized that balls hurdling at fans at 100 mph is a problem. Because of that, they have extended the netting beyond the dugout in order to protect fans that are so close to home plate they don’t have time to react.

What is so difficult about that? Who would ever say that architectural design is a reason to not protect fans? That’s right, the commissioner of Major League Baseball would. The game of baseball is so resistant to any sort of change that they will hardly lift a finger to protect a young fan from getting hit by a foul ball.

The players have had enough

Don’t think that the players on the field have any issue with extending the netting. They see on a daily basis how fast these baseballs can go.

Eduardo Escobar of the Minnesota Twins was rattled after yesterday’s incident. He told reporters, “I just saw blood coming out of this girl’s face, a ball like that could have killed a kid…It could have killed her”.

Escobar is right. A ball going that fast can kill someone. Should fans have to worry about that when they buy diamond level seats to a baseball game? Should the players have to worry about striking a fan anytime they hit a ball foul? Absolutely not.

Todd Frazier, the player who hit the foul ball, believes there should be netting up in all stadiums to protect the fans. He emphasized after the game that it is all about safety.

Frazier is right. If the league is concerned about safety enough to put up some simple netting, then why should fans bother to go to the game. Baseballs are flying into the stands every game and in most cases they are good at avoiding the ball. However, one instance of a fan getting hospitalized from a baseball should be enough to warrant netting.

The players have simply had enough. Matt Holliday and Brian Dozier were both in tears when this happened. Dozier called for MLB to extend the netting. There is never going to be a good enough reason to prevent these kind of things from happening.

This is not a new problem

Netting

Fans react to young fan being carried out of the stands (Pioneer Press)

In 2014, Bloomberg did an analysis of foul balls and found that roughly 1,750 fans are struck by foul balls during the regular season. Many of the instances are minor and the fan will usually only walk away with a bruise. It is another story for kids at the ball park though.

According to an article done by the Boston Globe, there was a 2010 incident where a 6-year old girl needed surgery for a shattered skull after being struck at a Braves game by a foul ball. In 2008, a 7-year old needed surgery to relieve brain swelling because of a foul ball.

The same article cites foul ball statistician Edwin Comber, who says 73 percent of all foul balls go into the stands. That may include a pop fly, a long ball down the line, or a grounder that gets scooped up. Every once in a while though there is going to be a scorcher that lines into the stands where you won’t be able to avoid it, no matter how much you are paying attention to the game.

Foul balls aren’t the only problem either. In 2015 a female spectator was carted off due to a broken bat flying into the stands. Bats flying into stands are not nearly as common as the foul balls. However, it is another reason why the netting is necessary.

Hockey is the only other major American sport where projectiles are flying through air at alarming rates. What does the NHL do to protect the fans from these projectiles? They put up boards and netting to ensure their fans safety when attending their events. Simple enough, right? Well, apparently not simple enough for Rob Manfred and Major League Baseball.

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“From Our Haus to Yours”

The new look C’s: Boston Celtics 2018 Preview

As the NBA offseason cycles through, many basketball fans find it hard not to talk about the upcoming Boston Celtics. From trading rising star Avery Bradley and trading the first overall pick, we have just begun on the changes that Danny Ainge and his organization have made.

Gordon Hayward signs with the c’s

Gordon Hayward was one of the biggest free agents available this offseason, and had offers from Miami, Utah and of course, Boston.

Hayward poses in All Star Game gear (purpleandblues.com)

However, Boston had something that stood out more than their past legends, Larry Bird, Bill Russell and a franchise with 17 total NBA championships: Head coach Brad Stevens. For those who don’t know the reasoning behind Stevens, Gordon Hayward played for Brad Stevens at Butler University, where Stevens coached in the past.

Right away, that boosted the Celtics’ chances of capturing yet another NBA All-Star.

Days later, Gordon Hayward officially signed with Boston on a four-year, $127,829,970 contract, doubling his recent contract of four years, $62,965,420 with the Utah Jazz.

The only downside of signing the recent All-Star is dealing with the nonexistent cap space. Boston needed to free cap space to sign Hayward to his full contract, which led to Boston trading away Avery Bradley, a beloved player in the eyes of Boston fans.

Boston traded Bradley to the Detroit Pistons, receiving Marcus Morris. Many are against this trade, but don’t forget the fact that Bradley is a free agent next season, who inevitably will ask for more money. This is something the Celtics cannot afford after the signing of Gordon Hayward.

third overall pick: jayson tatum. sf (duke)

The Celtics drafted Jayson Tatum with the third overall pick in the draft.

Tatum poses with the Celtics Front Office (boston.cbslocal.com)

Arguably the best man in this year’s draft, Jayson Tatum will bring his talents to Boston this upcoming season, bringing nothing but excitement to the organization and fans.

At Duke, Jayson Tatum recorded a total of 488 points, averaging 16.8 points per game as well as 7.3 rebounds per game, and shot nearly 50 percent on field goals in his single season with the Blue Devils. Tatum was ranked No. 3 in the 2016 ESPN Top 100 going into Duke University.

By the looks of the media, it seems like Tatum has already built chemistry with this Celtics roster, especially with Jaylen Brown who was a third overall pick in the NBA Draft two drafts ago. The two stars have referred to themselves as “7/11, always open” indicating their jersey numbers and the fact that they both hold great abilities to create openness on the court and sinking any shot.

Jayson Tatum will be a great attribute to this particular Celtics team. Whatever role Stevens gives him, Tatum will exceed.

depth

In addition to Gordon Hayward and rookie Jayson Tatum, the Celtics welcome Marcus Morris and Aron Baynes to the team, as well as key new players like Shane Larkin, Semi Ojeleye and Ante Zizic.

The Celtics made big moves to create a roster that embarks on winning a NBA championship.

Celtics coach, Brad Stevens (bostonglobe.com)

According to ABC News, Celtics president Danny Ainge said “I feel like our team is in better position than last year.”

Not to mention that the Celtics were NBA Eastern Conference finalists last season. The C’s look to change that to NBA East Champions, and even NBA Champions. With these added players, this goal is fully achievable.

How will this be done? Last season, the Celtics finshed 27th out of 30 teams in total rebounds, yet still managed to win the Eastern Conference regular season title. Simply, the Celtics needed more big men.

After one offseason, they have introduced a 6-8 forward in Jayson Tatum, a 7-foot center in Ante Zizic, a 6-10 center inn Aron Baynes and a 6-9 forward in Marcus Morris. These are all solid players with great height.

Mix this height with stars like Isaiah Thomas, Gordon Hayward and Al Horford, and you have a team with full potential to raise Boston’s 18th NBA Championship.

Brad Stevens will have a full roster with complete talent this upcoming season. With the new arrivals and established stars, the Celtics are trending up for next season.

 

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“From Our Haus to Yours”

Should psychologists be required for LCS teams?

With the tweets of top laner Jeon “Ray” Ji-won coming to light recently, the discussion of the mental health of professional players returns. Many fans on social media can be harsh to their favorite players when they perform poorly. The criticism pro players can face added with the stress of performing well on stage can take a toll on these young minds.

You also have to factor in that many of the players are experiencing their first times being away from home in a brand new team environment. Not to mention a brand new country/culture for imported players. If players don’t perform up to their own standards, their own mental health can take a toll.

History of Mental Health Issues in LCS

Psychologists

Photo by Riot Games

It’s no secret that some players have seen the need to retire due to the stress of being a pro player. Legendary players such as Dyrus and Voyboy noted the mental stress during their time in LCS. Sport psychologists have slowly been making their way onto professional teams, but not all.

The most well known psychologist in pro League of Legends would have to be Weldon Green who made a name for himself on TSM last year, and now G2. Both teams saw significant upgrades to their team’s play after bringing Weldon in. Most of the teams have bought into hiring sports psychologists for their teams. The early days of LCS of eating whatever and only playing the games are gone.

Teams are training players to be physically and mentally fit in all aspects of life. CLG opted to train in a top sports facility during the offseason as opposed to bootcamping in Korea like some teams. The result has been a first place spot so far after five and a half weeks of LCS.

Should Psychologists be Required for LCS teams?

Not too long ago, Riot made coaches a requirement for LCS teams. Should psychologists become the next thing to join that list of required staff? It definitely could be if more players were to speak out about some of their mental issues. It’s almost certain that Ray isn’t the only player facing these types of mental hurdles.

Even a few sessions a week could help players with managing their stress. Every team could use the benefit of a psychologist. Not only for struggling players, but for team life in general. Many teams that have taken on Psychologists can see the effect it has had on team environments. Roccat last Spring struggled before a late surge almost netted them a playoff spot. They credited this to bringing on a sports psychologist to help with the team atmosphere.

What we can do as fans

As fans, it’s easy to criticize our favorite pros when they fail to meet our expectations. We also need to remember that they’re people just like us who are performing on some of the world’s biggest stages of professional LoL. Most of them haven’t been groomed to receive the hate that some of the community is bound to expel when they have a poor game.

We must not be quick to make remarks based off emotions. Everyone isn’t going to play perfectly, but flaming them over social media most certainly won’t help them play any better. Pro players for the most part, know when they’ve messed up. They know if they cost their team a match. There’s no need for fans to tag them in tweets raging or making angry posts on Reddit. Let them learn from their mistakes and prove themselves next time.

 

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Cover photo by Riot Games