Position Rankings for 2017 MLB Season: Shortstop

In this fifth installment of our Position Rankings for the 2017 MLB Season, we will make our way around the horn, landing us at shortstop. Shortstop has seen an influx of young talent in recent seasons.

With the position fluxing with talent, let’s start out our list at number five.

5. Jean Segura- Seattle Mariners

2017 MLB Season

Jean Segura will bring his newfound power to the Pacific Northwest in 2017. (AP Photo, Ross D. Franklin)

Jean Segura will be on his fourth team in six years in the majors when he debuts for the Seattle Mariners this season. Part of a deal that sent Taijuan Walker to the desert, Segura will be paired alongside standout second baseman Robinson Cano. Segura’s 2013 season showed glimpses of what he could be.

This season he slashed .319, .368, and .499, which are all career highs. He also had 20 homers to go along with 64 RBI’s and 33 stolen bases. Segura developed into the total package offensively in 2016, but his defense still leaves something to be desired.

Segura had zero defensive runs saved in 2016, equating to league average on defense. With the offensive numbers he put up in 2016, league average defense is totally acceptable. Segura played second base with the Diamondbacks in 2016, but that was his first season at second base in his six-year career. He should be able to slide back over to his old position seamlessly in 2017.

4. Brandon Crawford- San Francisco Giants

Brandon Crawford has quietly put together a solid career for the San Francisco Giants. After hitting 26 home runs over parts of his first four seasons, he has clubbed 33 in the past two seasons. His growth in power has also been accompanied by an improvement in his batting skill. Last season, Crawford posted a slash line of .275, .342, and .430 with his batting average and OBP being career highs. While Crawford’s bat has continually improved, his glove has always been his calling card.

Crawford had one of his best defensive seasons of his career in 2016. He had 19 defensive runs saved in 2016, which is the second most in his career. With growing prowess in the batters box and a stellar glove, Crawford has quietly ascended into the ranks of the top shortstops in the game.

3. Francisco Lindor- Cleveland Indians

2017 MLB Season

Lindor will bring the total package to Cleveland in 2017. (Jason Miller, Getty Images North America)

After making his major league debut in 2015, Francisco Lindor has made the leap from top prospect to top position player for the Cleveland Indians. Lindor built on his debut 2015 season in which he finished second in the AL Rookie of the Year voting to put up a slash line of .301, .358, .435 in 2016. He also hit 15 homers to go along with 78 RBI’s and 19 stolen bases to help lead the Indians to the World Series. Lindor’s bat has certainly created problems for his opponents, but it’s his glove that has carried him this far in the rankings.

Lindor had 17 defensive runs saved in 155 games played in 2016. His slick fielding was on display all season. He also continued his high level of defense well into the World Series. Lindor was the total package for the Cleveland Indians in 2016. He is primed to lead the Indians back to the playoffs in 2017.

2. Corey Seager- Los Angeles Dodgers

Seager had been tabbed as the NL Rookie of the Year in 2016 long before the season began. All that hype can sometimes go to a player’s head, but not Corey Seager’s. He performed far beyond even the most lofty expectations in 2016, batting .308, .365, and .512. He also blasted 26 bombs to accompany 72 RBI’s. Those numbers were not only good enough for NL ROY, but also a third place finish for NL MVP voting.

While his bat was at an MVP type level, his glove work was anything but. While he wasn’t spectacular with the glove, he was league average with zero defensive runs saved in 2016. He proved to be a driving force for the Dodgers in 2016, helping lead them to the NLCS where they were ousted by the eventual World Series Champion Chicago Cubs. Seager will look to build on his impressive rookie season in 2017.

1. Carlos Correa- Houston Astros

2017 MLB Season

Carlos Correa will lead a stacked Astros team in 2017. (Troy Taormina, USA Today)

When Carlos Correa made his major league debut at the ripe old age of 20 in 2015, many wondered if he would be able to hack it in the majors. Well, hack it he did. Correa has knocked 42 balls into orbit since being called up by the Astros. In his first full season of play he hit .274, .361, and .451 to go along with 20 homers, 96 RBI’s and 13 steals. Correa has shown maturity beyond his years in the batters box. With a good eye and powerful stroke, Correa is already one of the elite offensive players in the game. The jump from elite prospect to elite player doesn’t just include hitting.

Correa has proved to be less than stellar in the field in parts of two major league season. While he has made some spectacular throws, he posted a defensive runs saved of -3 in 2016. While it was a regression from his 0 defensive runs saved in 2015, it was Correa’s first full season. The 2017 season will be a big one for both Carlos Correa and his Houston Astros.

Shortstop is in good hands for 2017 and far beyond. With so much youth at the position, shortstop will prove to be one of the more difficult positions to rank for years to come. Watch for these players to move up and down the list in the coming years.

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2017 MLB Season

Position Rankings for 2017 MLB Season: Starting Pitchers

With the start of the 2017 MLB season still about three months away (85 days, six minutes, and 43 seconds, but who’s counting?), players and teams are beginning to gear up for the first pitch on April 2.

Let’s take a look at the top five starting pitchers for Opening Day 2017.

5. Justin Verlander- Detroit Tigers

2017 MLB Season

Justin Verlander will hope his 2016 success carries over to 2017. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)

Verlander turned in a renaissance season for the Detroit Tigers in 2016. At age 33, he had his most innings pitched since 2012, posting a solid 227.2 innings. He coupled a full season with a return of his strikeout ability. Verlander struck out 254 batters and limited base runners with a WHIP of 1.00. The former Cy Young winner will look to continue his success into 2017.

4. Corey Kluber- Cleveland Indians

Corey Kluber bounced back in 2016 from a disappointing 2015 when he posted a record of 9-16. He matched his win-loss record from his Cy Young Award winning season in 2014 of 18-6. Kluber posted a solid ERA of 3.14 as well as striking out 227 batters over 215 innings pitched. He helped anchor a staff that would be a key component in the Indians run to the World Series. A surprise contender in 2016, the Indians won’t be sneaking up on anyone this season, led by staff ace Corey Kluber.

3. Madison Bumgarner- San Francisco Giants

Madison Bumgarner is coming off of a season in which he posted career highs in strike outs (251), innings pitched (226.2), and ERA (2.77). All of that was good enough for him to garner his fourth straight All-Star game appearance, as well as a fourth-place finish in the NL Cy Young Award voting. Bumgarner led San Francisco to the NL Division Series, but the Giants were beaten soundly 3-1 by the eventual World Series champion Chicago Cubs. Surrounded by a strong pitching staff, Bumgarner will anchor the Giants starting rotation for 2017.

2. Clayton Kershaw- Los Angeles Dodgers

Even the casual baseball fan knows of the legendary dominance of lefty Clayton Kershaw. The three-time Cy Young Award winner is only going to be 29 years old when the season starts, leaving his already stellar career all the more impressive. All this lauding may lead you to wonder why he is only second on this list. That is because of all the pitchers in contention for this list, Kershaw had by far the lowest number of innings pitched with only 149. He had his 2016 season cut short by injuries. Before he got hurt, he was on his way to posting an ERA below two (1.69) for the third time in four seasons! If it wasn’t for injuries, Kershaw would have been the runaway NL Cy Young winner as well as number one on this list. Kershaw is on track to to start Opening Day for the Dodgers.

1. Max Scherzer- Washington Nationals

2017 MLB Season

Max Scherzer will dominate the NL in 2017. (Brad Mills/USA Today)

Max Scherzer won the NL Cy Young Award in 2016, and it’s easy to see why. He posted an ERA of 2.96, but it was his peripheral numbers that vaulted him to the Cy Young Award. He struck out an astounding 284 batters over 228.1 innings pitched. Scherzer also got batters out with ground balls and fly outs, supported by his WHIP of .097. By limiting opponents to an average of less than one baserunner per inning, and striking out batters at an astronomical rate, Scherzer was able to claim the NL Cy Young Award in 2016. In his prime, he is poised to add to his trophy case in 2017.

As the 2017 season draws nearer, look for these top five starting pitchers to dominate in 2017. Also watch out for some other names that just missed the cut. Pitchers like Chris Sale, David Price, Jake Arrieta and Noah Syndergaard will all be looking to make the cut next season.

 

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How Rob Manfred Can Build on the Game 7 Hype

Game 7 of the World Series between the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians was the most viewed game in the past twenty-five years. The storyline was too good to be true for Rob Manfred, the commissioner of the MLB. The big market Cubs and the beloved Indians were facing the longest World Series droughts in the MLB. Either way, one team was going to break their curse. It was the series that everybody was talking about as the series was unorthodox, but still emotionally gripping. In the end, it was the Cubs that survived victorious.

The hype surrounding the game had even the most casual of sports fans watching. Baseball is a sport often seen as stagnating with the young audience. One of Rob Manfred’s biggest issues is how to help grow a sport often seen as stale and slow. Often referred to as America’s pastime, the game truly does not feel like it has done everything it can to keep up with modern times to help reach an audience that will need to be captivated in order for baseball to flourish over the next couple of decades. This article will provide just a couple things that could be done to help modernize the game.

First off, it is hard for millennials to watch their favorite team play without having to go to a bar. The MLB has been making strides to make the games more accessible for cord-cutters, but truthfully, their efforts have not been enough. MLB.TV was a good first step to providing the entertainment, as $85 to have the ability to watch all or your team’s 162 games is a bargain. Local blackouts, however, hinder the fans who are in their team’s regional TV coverage. For example, if a fan of Cincinnati, Cleveland, or Pittsburgh lives in Columbus, Ohio, they would not be able to watch their team play on MLB.TV due to these blackout rules unless they had a cable subscription (defeating the purpose of buying MLB.TV).

 

 

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Above is the blackout map for each state. Poor Iowans have up to six teams in their blackout zone, hurting cord cutters in the state. Photo courtesy of wikimedia.

Now, the reason why these blackout rules exist is because cable companies know the only chance to survive the cord cutting trend is to save their sports channels. Of course, their are ways to circumvent the blackout rules through shady means, but truthfully, the casual viewer does not want to go to that length just to watch their local team.  Team owners, Manfred, and cable companies need to come to some agreement to avoid these blackouts. Sadly, this may never be the case, as baseball owners make a ton of money off all these regional sports channel agreements . Oftentimes, these agreements make up a significant portion of the money used to fund the roster of many small market teams. If Manfred is serious about making baseball more appealing to the millennials, he needs to find a way to make baseball more accessible to the fans. He also needs to find a way for an individual to stream their local team.

The second step revolves around a debate that has been surrounding baseball for years now. On one side of the aisle is the viewpoint of baseball as a gentleman’s game, where celebrations are mild and respect is shown by a player to the opposing team. More recently, however, has been a slowly growing movement of players that are not afraid to step out of that zone and celebrate a big hit. Jose Bautista may have received the most venom for his 2015 ALCS Game 6 bat flip, but it is moments like that that resonate with the young fans. Obviously there should be limits to the celebration. I’m not talking about letting a man break dance on home plate after hitting a monster home run, but let the hitter slowly walk out of the box as he hits his moonshot. Maybe, just maybe, let the hitter flip his bat back to his dugout in excitement without being afraid of getting belted by a fastball his next time up to bat.

MLB: Spring Training-Oakland Athletics at Los Angeles Dodgers

Jose Bautista is not the only player with a legitimate bat flip. Yasiel Puig, often mired in controversy, has been flipping bats after home runs ever since he started in the majors. Photo courtesy of cbssports.com

It does not stop with the hitters. Pitchers have their fair share of celebrating already. Fist bumps are very common among relievers and closers who pitch out of a jam. The issue is that pitchers normally go unpunished for celebrating, unlike the hitters who may have to go up later in the game and get hit on purpose for celebrating a little too much. Baseball should be promoting these moments of personality, not letting hitters get crushed by both opposing pitchers and media pundits that are stuck in the “old ways” of baseball. Baseball needs personality out on the field, not robots.

Last, but not least, surrounds the World Baseball Classic. The hype machine needs to start today on getting America prepared for it. A rather new tradition, the WBC is the World Cup of Baseball, which is played every four years. Players should be honored to represent their teams, especially as the sport is strong in not just America, but Asia and the Caribbean as well. Most importantly, however, is that baseball needs the best Americans representing the United States. Manfred then needs to get the WBC accessible to all kinds of fans and not try to make people watch the games on FS1 or other weird channels very few people actually utilize.

The last WBC Team USA squad in 2013 definitely had some recognizable names, featuring a young Giancarlo Stanton, prime Ryan Braun and Adam Jones, and Captain America himself, David Wright. Frankly, the rest of the roster was full of players adored in their personal market and team fandom, but often unrecognized on the bigger stages. Think of an infield of Buster Posey, Paul Goldschmidt, Jose Altuve, Manny Machado, and Kris Bryant. Now couple that infield with an outfield of Giancarlo Stanton, Mike Trout, and Bryce Harper. Not only does that give you one of the best teams truly ever assembled in baseball (better than most fan voted all-star teams even), but also gives plenty of young personalities from many different markets all across the US that can get each area to rally around the team.

The downside of the WBC has always been the fear of overuse on the players before the season starts. An understandable fear, and one faced by many sports who have the same international competition. Injuries are avoided as much as possible, but they are also natural and going to occur regardless of players participating in this tournament, or in just regular spring training. Have MLB promote this as truly a world tournament and get people interested, even if it is 1/10th as popular as the FIFA World Cup, and that momentum could carry over into the regular season.

In the end, baseball is such a different sport for viewers than many of the other popular sports. Football, Hockey, and Basketball are all fast paced and timed. Baseball is both untimed and slower moving, with each pitch taking as long as a football play. Josh Burris outlined here why baseball is a fun sport to watch, as many casual fans experienced this World Series. Making local teams more accessible for cord-cutters in the team’s region would be a valuable first step to let younger fans enjoy the sport. Letting the players exhibit more flair and style into their play can make the game more fun and exciting for a group of fans that spend their time watching vines and memes on the internet daily. Finally, sell the crap out of the World Baseball Classic to not only expose the brand on an international market, but also help casual and new American fans meet the biggest American players on a competitive squad. Rob Manfred has a lot on his plate for the future. Only time will tell how baseball’s popularity will transition from here.

 

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How Did the Cubs Build a World Series Squad?

The Chicago Cubs won Game seven of the World Series on Wednesday, ending the longest drought in MLB history. In one of the most exciting games in baseball history, the Cubs defeated the Cleveland Indians in extra innings and were thus crowned World Champions. GM Theo Epstein has assembled a team in Chicago that is built for the long haul, a team that can truly compete for the next five World Series. How did Theo Epstein assemble such a talented squad of players?

The answer may seem simple, but in truth, is a lot harder than it sounds. Epstein nailed his draft picks and won more of his trades than he lost. Before the 2016 season commenced, Epstein knew his team had a chance to compete, and went out and signed players that could fill the missing roles in the team. It is a recipe for success that Epstein established at his previous tenure in Boston where he had broken another curse in 2004 before winning the 2007 World Series with Boston as well.

Epstein began his most recent tenure in Chicago in October 2011. He would proceed to finish in the cellar of the division his first three seasons before getting to the NLCS in 2015 and winning the World Series in 2016. This is important because those three seasons in the cellar led to very nice draft picks for Epstein and the Cubs organization.

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Theo Epstein assembled a World Series team in 5 years. Could he be considered one of the greatest GMs of all time? Photo courtesy of Boston.com

2012, aka Epstein’s first draft, led to the Cubs drafting Albert Almora Jr. with the 6th overall pick. The 2013 MLB Draft saw the Cubs owning the second overall pick, which would be used on Kris Bryant. 2014 sparked controversy for the Cubs, as the organization drafted Kyle Schwarber, which was seen as a reach for the Cubs at the time by pundits. These three first rounders were all on the World Series squad, with Bryant and Schwarber both contributing heavily with their production at the plate.

Epstein was a trade machine in Boston, and the same philosophy carried over to his tenure in Chicago. Epstein was a master of selling players at their peak and actually netting a strong return in terms of prospects. For example, the Cubs traded Scott Feldman to help shore up Baltimore’s rotation in exchange for reliever Pedro Strop and starter Jake Arrieta. Arrieta had never pitched with great success in Baltimore, averaging an ERA of 5.46 while playing for the Orioles. Since joining the Cubs, his ERA since 2013 has averaged out to 2.52 over his last three seasons.

Arrieta is not the only present core Cub to be received in a trade. Anthony Rizzo, a stud first base prospect at the time, was picked up from San Diego for a package built around Andrew Cashner. Cashner  had some inconsistent success in San Diego, but Rizzo is currently one of the top first basemen in all of baseball. The Cubs traded starter Ryan Dempster, who was having a very strong season in his own right, to the Rangers in exchange for Kyle Hendricks. Addison Russell was also picked up in a trade by Epstein, who had to give up Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel (yes, the same Hammel who would go on to resign with the Cubs in the following offseason) for the package built around Russell.

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Addison Russell is the reason Starlin Castro was traded by Epstein. Russell proved the faith was true as he knocked in 6 RBIs in Game 6 of the World Series. Photo courtesy of realsport101.com

Epstein also made the right decision in regards to personnel choices on the roster. Epstein had acquired a plethora of talent at nearly every position in the minors. Epstein leaned on this talent as he traded veterans to be replaced by the inexperienced rookies. Epstein dumped Starlin Castro so both Addison Russell and Javier Baez could have starting positions in the Cubs middle infield. Plenty of talent were traded or axed for marginal returns to make room for the future stars of the Cubs. Yet, despite all these wily veterans being traded, none of the talent really amounted to much after the trades. The biggest names include players like Justin Ruggiano, Marlon Byrd, Carlos Zambrano, and Alfonso Soriano.

Looking at all this wheeling and dealing, Epstein is bound to come across a couple trades that could be viewed as losses right? In all honesty, there is really only two trades that could be viewed as losses and both trades have reasonable defense for the action. First, was DJ LeMahieu being traded to the Rockies. LeMahieu has since produced an All-Star season playing second base for the Rockies, but the trade can be defended as Epstein already had his future middle infield in Castro and Baez (with Russell on the way). The only other lost trade was trading Welington Castillo to Seattle for next to nothing. Truth be told, Castillo never really was an offensive threat in Chicago, and the Cubs had already turned to alternatives to replace him at the catching position.

In truth, Epstein has been nearly flawless in constructing this 2016 World Champion squad. A few things shook out in his favor, like Jake Arrieta shaking off his kinks and becoming an ace pitcher. That being said, every team needs a little luck to win in the playoffs. Epstein’s impact trades and draft picks have setup the Cubs for success for the next five years. Now the final test will be to see if Epstein and the Cubs can sustain this success for the next decade or so, potentially putting together a team that can be a true dynasty, much to the dismay of the rest of the NL Central.

Warriors or Indians: Which 3-1 Collapse is Bigger?

If you’ve perused social media at all in the past five months, I’m sure numerous people have reminded you that the Golden State Warriors blew a 3-1 lead in the NBA Finals to the Cleveland Cavaliers. As of last night, the Warriors are no longer alone among teams in 2016 to blow such a lead in their league finals. The Cleveland Indians suffered a similar fate at the hands of the Chicago Cubs in the World Series. So now the question arises… which team’s descent from the brink of a championship to runner up was a more historic collapse?

While the Indians’ collapse was certainly heartbreaking for a team and fan-base that hasn’t won a World Series in 68 years, in my book the Warriors’ NBA Finals flop still holds the title for the bigger collapse in a 2016 final. Here’s why:

The Warriors Regular Season

Image result for stephen curry

Image courtesy of Business Insider


Yes, the 2015-16 Warriors have the record for the best regular season ever in NBA history, but that’s all it will ever be now. They were one game away from immortalizing what would have been the most dominant season ever put together by an NBA team. Their greatness in the regular season will be forever overshadowed by their inability to close out Cleveland in the Finals. Not only that, but the Warriors had Steph Curry, the NBA’s first ever unanimous regular season MVP. While the Indians roster certainly was full of talented players, no player on the team received the same recognition for his play the same way Curry did.

Draymond Green Suspension

There were no issues that prevented the Cubs or the Indians from putting their best starting lineup on the field for all seven games of the World Series. The Warriors, however, saw star Draymond Green suspended from Game 5 of the series for hitting LeBron James in the groin. Whether the suspension was warranted or not, Game 5 provided the turning point for the Cavs to start their run at history.  The impact Green could have had on the game will forever be questioned. Would he have made enough of a difference to win Game 5? All we can do now is speculate.

Image result for draymond green suspension

Image courtesy of FOX Sports.

There can only be one First Team

The Cavs’ comeback from a 3-1 deficit in the NBA Finals was the first ever to occur in the NBA Finals. While it doesn’t make it any less painful for the Indians or their fans, they were not the first team to blow a 3-1 lead in the World Series. The 1925 Washington Senators hold the rights to that unfortunate title. The 1968 St. Louis Cardinals were up 3-1 against the Detroit Tigers and were also unable to seal the deal. They did the same thing against the Kansas City Royals in 1985. The Baltimore Orioles shared a similar fate vs. the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1979. The point is, while it may not offer too much solace to Cleveland, the Indians were only the most recent team to blow a 3-1 lead in the World Series. At least they share that company with a handful of other teams.

The Warriors, however, are currently the only NBA team to have blown a 3-1 Finals lead. I have no doubt that another team in the future will share a similar fate, but history always remembers two teams: the first to do something, and the most recent to do it. Unfortunately for Golden State, there’s no such thing as a second first.

While the numbers behind the leads appear the same, the Warriors’ 2016 Finals collapse is on a different scale than that of the Indians. Does that mean Cleveland fans should be let off the hook from the 3-1 jokes? That’s up to how vengeful you might be feeling after five months of reading them. And while you can certainly make the case that it’s time Indians fans began reaping what they’ve sown. Is it karma? Who knows, all I know is, I won’t let the Indians blowing a 3-1 lead distract me from the fact that the Warriors blew a 3-1 lead.

Logos courtesy of sportslogos.net

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Cleveland Indians Prove That Money is Not Everything

The Cleveland Indians are one win away from being World Series Champions for the 2016 season. Unexpected by most MLB pundits at the beginning of the season, the Indians are in the driver’s seat as games 6 and 7 (if necessary) will be played at Progressive Field (The Jake). The Indians have a nice young core of players in place that even if the Indians were to fail this year, the team has the potential to return the next few seasons to attempt to become champions again.

The Indians have this kind of exciting future because of years of rebuilding that is very common among small market teams. Unlike any other major sport in the United States, the MLB does not have a salary cap. Thus, the lack of salary cap has divided teams into two categories, small market and large market teams.

Small market teams are exactly that, a team that does not throw around a lot of money (relatively speaking) on the free agency market. The team can still be from a major city, but will more than likely look to trade a player to maximize a return instead of keeping them for the rest of the year if the team feels it cannot make a playoff run, especially if the team feels they will not be able to resign them in the offseason.

Small market team success is almost always cyclical, as the team will rise to a peak around a core group of players for a couple of seasons, only to lose said players to teams that can afford them once free agency hits. Losing these players will lead to down seasons until the team acquires a new young core to take the place of the old.

Cleveland Indians

Pablo Sandoval is a modern example of large market money being wasted. Pablo is making $19 million a year to ride the bench for the Red Sox. Photo courtesy of USATSI

Large market teams are the teams that always feel the media pressure to win, and as such, tend to shell out more money once free agency hits during the offseason. Often found in the largest American cities, these teams tend to experience the most success and the biggest national brands. Money not being an issue for these teams may create more success for their fans, but oftentimes, large market teams draw the disdain of the smaller market fans because of the money.

Teams like the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox can afford to take more risks on the market, handing out too much money on players who can bust and still not hurt the team too badly.

The Cleveland Indians fall into the category of the former as one of the many small market teams in the MLB. The Indians were one of the top American League teams through the late 1990’s before losing their core and starting the rebuild.

From 2002 through the end of 2012 (11 total seasons), the Indians finished with an above .500 record only twice (three times if you consider 2008 where they finished exactly .500). The Indians spent that decade signing and drafting the core in place now, trading away notable players like Bob Wickman, C.C. Sabathia, and Cliff Lee. In return, the Indians received many failed and fringe talents, but also received future studs like Carlos Carrasco and Michael Brantley.

Receiving prospects for proven talent is a tricky business in the MLB. Scouting is very important, as the majority of prospects never make it in the MLB.  The MLB draft is important as prospects establish the core of every small market team.

So much can go wrong before these prospects make the majors, that said it can truly take some teams a decade or more for a true rebuild to occur. Modern medicine and scouting techniques have helped improve a team’s chances of landing a stud prospect, but sometimes luck is what a team needs more than anything.

The Cleveland Indians drafted Cody Allen in the 16th round of the 2010 amateur draft. Cody Allen is now a top-10 closer on a potential World Series champion team.

Cleveland Indians

Corey Kluber may pitch like an ace now, but he was not drafted like it. Klubot was drafted in the 4th round of the 2007 amateur draft by the San Diego Padres. He would later be sent to the Indians in a 3 team deal involving Ryan Ludwick and Jake Westbrook.

Small market teams must prioritize who to spend money on once free agency looms for their core. These teams can not afford all their players, so these teams must pick and choose who they can keep.

The Cincinnati Reds faced this dilemma in regards to their rotation when the team peaked in 2012. The Reds could only afford to pay one of their three stud pitchers of Johnny Cueto, Mat Latos, and Homer Bailey. The Reds picked Bailey from the bunch, who has had a career marred by injuries since signing his contract extension.

The Indians will have some difficult decisions with their bullpen in the future as well. Picking the right players to pay will not be the only factor in keeping a small market team afloat, but it will expedite the rebuild and keep the excitement going for most fans.

The Indians appearance in the 2016 World Series gives faith to most small market teams, showing that their is a light at the end of the rebuild tunnel. Building through the draft and acquiring prospects may be hard for fans to watch in the early going, but when done effectively, will provide a core that will give the team an opportunity to win it all a few years down the road. The Indians construction of a young and elite rotation, a good core of hitters, and a dominant bullpen gives a recipe for other small market teams to follow. It is truly up to the scouting and development of each team to effectively implement the blueprint to succeed.

The Indians are not the first small market team to reach such success and they will definitely not be the last. Fans of small market teams, nevertheless, are happy to see the Indians in the World Series simply to reaffirm the belief that someday their team will be in the same spot once their process is complete. Having the Indians defeat a large market team like the Chicago Cubs would just be icing on the cake for most of these fans.

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