2017 NFL Draft Profile: Jordan Bowman

The College Gridiron Showcase shows off the top college football players from across the NCAA in a five-day camp. The camp is selective and prestigious, and gives under the radar prospects a chance to shine for over 100 professional scouts to see. Former California of Pennsylvania University star Jordan Bowman was one of the players invited to the showcase, and Bowman had a chance to talk with NFL scouts about his game.

The feedback he got was both positive and constructive.

“I need to work on my hip mobility,” Bowman said. “Some people think I have tight hips and I can’t flip them as fluently as I should be able to. I also got feedback that I’m a smart football player with pretty good instincts and ball skills.”

Bowman was an All-American for one of Division II’s finest football programs. Bowman piled multiple awards over his four years with the team, including multiple all-region and all-conference awards.

The strong safety is one of the best all-around players that you’ve probably never heard of. Bowman has size, speed, intangibles and a great personality, all of which can makeup a future NFL performer.

Jordan Bowman

Photo: Mon Valley Independent

The fact that Bowman comes from what could be called the Ohio State of Division II in terms of NFL production helps his cause. With several former Cal players in the NFL right now, Bowman thinks scouts need to give high consideration to players coming out of the program.

“I definitely think they should because we have six guys in the league right now,” Bowman said. “We were also very good this year and have a lot of big names in our class. I feel as though a lot of scouts are definitely gonna be on the lookout for us and Cal teams to come.”

Cal has bred Bowman into a solid football player, and the strong safety puts in plenty of work off the field to become the player he is.

“I take pride in my football IQ and my preparation,” Bowman said. “Watching film, hours of it each week, looking at QB tendencies, favorite route concepts, receiver giveaways and being all over the field.”

Bowman’s talent isn’t just in his head. Bowman scored a touchdown in all four seasons at Cal and totaled 170 career tackles.

“I bring consistency, I bring leadership, I bring all traits of a safety,” Bowman said. “I can tackle, I can run, I can cover, and I stay out of trouble.”

Bowman, although gifted, will see a huge talent disparity as he transitions from playing Division II college football to playing with the greatest football players on the planet in the NFL. Bowman is solid in the box, playing man and dropping back in coverage, but doing those things in the NFL is no easy task.

The NFL prospect understands how different the NFL is. Athletes that play in the league are physically gifted like no one else.

“I think the biggest thing is gonna be the size and speed,” Bowman said. “Playing against Julio Jones who is 6-4, 220 and runs a sub 4-40, those guys are freaks that you don’t normally see.”

Even with a bright future playing football, any athlete’s playing days are numbered. Luckily for Bowman, he’s smart in areas that aren’t just football.

Bowman majored in business administration at Cal. The major is broad and many aren’t sure what to do with a business degree.

Bowman isn’t one of those people. Just like Bowman stands out on the football field, he wants to stand out in business.

“I want to be an entrepreneur and create my own path,” Bowman said. “I don’t wanna just be a guy in a company, come to work 9-5 every day. I’d rather open my own shop or franchise.”

Jordan Bowman was one of the best players in one of the best programs in college football during his time at Cal. Bowman has the potential and tools to bring that success to the NFL.

His playing days are numbered, just like anyone else’s. However, luckily for Bowman, he has a plan, whether he’s on the field or off.

Jordan Bowman Scouting Report

His height and weight (6 feet, 208 pounds) are good enough for the NFL level and he has great football IQ, demonstrating his attention to detail in the film room. He is able to be positioned near the line of scrimmage like Troy Polamalu, or cover deep.

Jordan Bowman (Photo courtesy: nfldraftonline.com)

Once the ball is snapped, Bowman starts reading the quarterback’s eyes and diagnosing the play, both of which he does well. When the ball is thrown he jumps the route and makes plays. He is solid at both man to man and zone coverage. Bowman displays the ability to be in the right place at the right time, something that is key for safeties.

He is capable in run support and demonstrates his tackling ability. Bowman isn’t used as a blitzer often, but when he is, he takes down the ball carrier or quarterback often.

Some concerns with Bowman will be his speed and his ability to cover NFL-level talent.

Teams will love Bowman’s ability to play special teams and that is how he will be able to make an immediate impact on an NFL team. He will be fighting to make an NFL roster so excelling at special teams needs to be his competitive advantage over other players vying to make the team.

You can view Jordan Bowman’s highlights here.

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Jordan Bowman in its entirety below.

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Aaron Terry

Football players are just dumb jocks, or so they say. However, that’s not the case for two-time All-American Aaron Terry.

Terry played for Division II powerhouse California University of Pennsylvania and garnered multiple impressive national and regional awards. All the while, Terry found his way onto the dean’s list multiple times and will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice in May.

If that’s not remarkable enough, Terry intends to pursue a master’s in business as he pursues an NFL career. Later on, Terry sees himself working for Homeland Security.

Terry was an electric punt returner and ball-hawking defensive back, and he expects to bring those traits with him to the NFL.

The 5-foot-11-inch standout can play anywhere in the defensive backfield, and his versatility gives him a shot at making an NFL roster.

“I’m able to play more than one position on the field,” Terry said. “I’m very good at special teams as well. You’re able to do more things with me.”

Aaron Terry

Photo: California University of Pennsylvania Athletics

His encounters at Cal are some that he values emphatically.

“My experience has just been one of a kind,” Terry said. “It’s definitely not something that I would trade in for any other school.”

“In high school, I never won a championship and then I get to Cal and I win a championship and I’m on the winning team. It was a great atmosphere. I love the team and I would never trade it in.”

Terry may want to thank his parents for his athletic ability. His mother was an all-state pitcher in high school and his father was a “very well-known” basketball player in Virginia.

While on the field, Terry amassed 13 interceptions and 175 total tackles. The three-time all-conference player also added one punt return for a touchdown in his career.

Terry averaged 13.2 yards per return as a punt returner and he credits his high football IQ to his success.

“The most important thing about punt return is being smart back there and not being scared,” Terry said. “I’m very smart and I understand what decisions to make and what not to make.”

Terry is working on every little thing to gain an edge. He is training in Pittsburgh while finishing his degree at Cal. Terry does weight training and combine drills and is never content with his talent level.

“You’re never as good as you want to be and I’m never satisfied,” Terry said. “I’m just making sure I perfect my craft. There’s always more room for improvement and I’m really a strong believer in that.”

Terry credits his eyes and instincts to his incredible play in zone coverage. Those smarts are helping him become a darkhorse candidate to become a great player at the next level.

Those same smarts will propel Terry to a successful career. Whether it be in football or criminal justice, Aaron Terry has the work ethic and intelligence to make a splash in whatever he does.

Aaron Terry Scouting Report

Terry has adequate size for an NFL defensive back at a touch under 6 feet and 200 pounds. He is usually in good position pre-snap, but sometimes gives a lot of cushion to receivers. That is something that can be fixed easily for the next level.

Aaron Terry

Aaron Terry (Photo courtesy: lockerroomupdate.com)

He is above average in man-to-man coverage, but is a great zone defender. The main quality that makes his zone coverage great is his ability to recognize where the receivers are and where they will be. He gets himself in the right position to make the play.

On broken plays, Terry shows good discipline by staying with his man or shutting down his zone. This gives the pass rushers more time to make a play.

As with many players at the Division II level, Terry will be questioned on whether he can cover NFL-level talent if asked to play man-to-man.

Like his teammate, Jordan Bowman, Terry offers the ability to play special teams and is a good punt returner. He has good hands and uses his excellent vision to find holes in the return game and breaks big plays. He has a career punt return average of 13.2 yards per return.

You can view Aaron Terry’s Highlights here.

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Aaron Terry in its entirety below.

 

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Tyler Peerson

Tyler Peerson never missed a game in his time with California University of Pennsylvania. Tyler Peerson also started every single game with Cal, which is one of Division II football’s most accomplished programs.

That’s 44 games started, in 44 possible games. Tyler Peerson is durable. Tyler Peerson also was a first team All-American his senior season.

It’s safe to say Peerson is as consistent as they come. But playing a bunch of games played won’t impress NFL scouts. Scouts want to see talent. Luckily for Peerson has the talent.

“My hand placement is always on point,” Peerson said. “That’s something I’ve been able to acquire through wrestling in high school.”

Hand placement is one of the most important aspects of an offensive lineman’s repertoire. You’ve got to be able to move large men around and displace their movements.

“Not only the hand placement, but finishing blocks, blocking to the whistle,” Peerson said. “Just really opening up those holes for the backs or giving the quarterback the most time.”

Cal has sent multiple players to the NFL, which is already impressive for a Division II program. What’s more, C.J. Goodwin, who played in Super Bowl LI for the Atlanta Falcons, graduated from Cal.

Tyler Peerson (Photo courtesy: nfldraftdiamonds.com)

Peerson’s teammates, Jordan Bowman and Aaron Terry, are also in line to make an NFL squad.

It’s safe to say Peerson has a pedigree of talent and winning flowing through his veins after four years at Cal.

“Cal of PA has been great for me,” Peerson said. “This past season has been awesome because for the most part we were just blowing teams out which was a lot of fun.”

Other than Cal’s three-point win over IUP, the closest regular season game was a 35-14 beatdown of Gannon (PA). Cal scored 48 points or more in seven of its ten regular season games, thanks in no small part to Peerson.

The team averaged 49.6 points per game, good for first in the entire NCAA Division II.

Although there weren’t too many close calls in Peerson’s career, he relished the opportunity to play in tight games.

“The ones I always enjoy are the ones that are nail biters and they just come down to the wire,” Peerson said. “Those are the ones I enjoy the most, win or lose.”

As Peerson trains for his Pro Day, he’s working to becoming a more well-rounded, versatile player. He said he wants to be able to serve a team anywhere on the line and improve any team he’s on.

With solid size and mobility, Peerson has a great shot to help serve an NFL team. His durability is unmatched, and he’s been a one-of-a-kind player during his time at Cal.

Tyler Peerson Scouting Report

Peerson has good size for a guard at 6’4″ and 305 pounds. He has the versatility to play a lot of positions on the offensive line which will be his main selling point to NFL teams.

Run blocking is what Peerson is best at. He can block his man one on one and get downfield. After blocking his man he can get to the second level to pick up more blocks. He uses his mobility to pull effectively and picks up his block on the outside. Peerson is also good at getting downfield to block on screens.

His pass blocking isn’t as good as his run blocking, but he recognizes blitzes and picks them up. He has the necessary mobility to slide over and block pass rushers who are about to sack the quarterback.

Scouts will need to see that he can block players that have elite strength and speed, but Peerson has the fundamentals down.

You can view Tyler Peerson’s Highlights here.

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Tyler Peerson in its entirety below.

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!