Jensen

C9 Jensen for NALCS MVP

Since joining Cloud9 and the NALCS in Spring 2015, Jensen has sat in the shadow cast by Bjergsen. Jensen has fallen short of the MVP trophy time and again, often at the hands of the touted mid laner from TSM. It hard to imagine a split where Jensen isn’t a front runner for the title, or at least in the conversation. Despite being a major contender Jensen has yet to achieve the illustrious title of Most Valuable Player.

This year may be his year though. Jensen has put up some amazing numbers this split and had some incredible performances. He is far from the clear choice for the award but has a good shot at it. He still must prove himself better than Xmithie or Bjergsen.

Stats

Jensen

Via Lolesports Flickr

 

It’s hard not to discuss stats when discussing performance. If the MVP of the league is who has had the best performance throughout the split, then talking stats is almost unavoidable. Stats aren’t everything, but they are a big indicator.

KDA has always been a major indicator of overall performance. Not only do kills generate gold, but they generate map pressure, so being able to net kills and assists while not dying yourself is a major key. Jensen currently has the highest KDA in the NALCS with an impressive 6.6. For context, Bjergsen has a 5.7, and Xmithie has a 2.8. It also helps that he has the highest kills in the league at a staggering 134. That’s 18 kills higher than Stixxay and Huhi, who are tied for second at 116.

Kill participation is also an important stat. It lets us know how much of the kills are generated around and through the player. Jensen is tied for fourth in the league with Biofrost and Bjergsen at 75.4%. The highest is Matt who has 77.8% KP. That’s only 2.4% higher than Jensen and Bjergsen. MikeYeung isn’t far behind with a 74.8%. Xmithie only has 66.6% KP, despite having a great showing so far this split.

The final stat that factors into this is CS/M. On top of Jensen’s incredible KDA and KP he also holds the highest CS/M at 9.4, which is .8 CS/M over Bjergsen. This is where it is next level. Having the highest KDA, and a high KP is one thing, but still being able to have the best farm on top of that is truly incredible.

Intangibles

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Numbers, however indicative of good performance, can only tell us so much. There are certain intangibles an MVP must demonstrate. This includes playmaking ability, consistency, and carry potential.

Jensen has demonstrated some amazing mechanical ability this split already. While he doesn’t have any huge teamfight turning plays this season, he does have a few solo kills like this. Jensen’s playmaking comes more in the vein of his consistency.

Jensen is the face of consistency. He performs well during most losses, and sports a 41% kill share throughout the regular season.  He isn’t getting quadrakills and pentakills, rather he is pumping out consistent damage in team fights and dominating the laning phase. In fact, Jensen has no quadrakills or pentakills this season, despite having three games with double digit kill scores.

As for his carry potential, Jensen brings that in spades. The man crushes lane opponents and snowballs from the midlane. His roams often net kills for himself and his other laners. From this lead, he is able to relieve pressure from elsewhere on the map by either taking it onto himself in the mid lane, or moving himself to where the pressure is. Take for example his Leblanc game against IMT.

Opponents

Jensen

Via Lolesports Flickr

 

As for the major contenders for the award. Xmithie has plays like this one. His mechanical prowess isn’t the only reason he’s a top three choice for MVP however. His stats are likely so low because of what he has been able to do for his laners. Xmithie has often controlled the jungle of the opponents and thus allowed himself to create large leads for his laners. He often snowballs the game by getting all of his laners ahead in the early game and having a stranglehold on neutral objectives in the mid game.

Bjergsen, on the other hand, spearheads the charge of TSM. He plays much like Bjergsen does, dominating the laning phase and snowballing the side lanes. However, he hasn’t been as nearly as dominant as Jensen has this season. What Bjergsen does have going for him, however, is a better win/loss. I think that speaks more to Bjergsen’s team as opposed to his own individual play, but may be a little bit of both.

In short, Jensen has been an animal this split. When he gets rolling, he’s nearly impossible to stop. He has performed very consistently this split and if he continues this level of play, I’m confident that he will finally take home the NALCS MVP award.


Stats via Best.gg and Lolesports.com

Cover Photo Via lolesports

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The boys of silver: Cloud 9’s second place tenure

Recently it’s been an emotional roller coaster for Cloud 9 fans. I should know. I’ve been one since I started watching esports. I came to League by way of Smash. I was, and still am, a Mang0 fan. When I started watching League in spring of season 4 I decided since Mang0 had been picked up by C9 I’d stay true to the org and root for C9. Fortunately, they won that split. Unfortunately, they haven’t won in NA since. While C9 hasn’t had an unsuccessful split since, even finishing 7th didn’t stop them from making it to worlds, they have been unable to clutch the NA championship trophy. Coming in 2nd no less than four times. Falling short all four times to TSM, who hasn’t missed an NA final since the inception of LCS.

I’m not displeased with Cloud 9’s performances, far from it. It is great to be a C9 fan. I can’t imagine the masochism that CLG and Team Liquid fans have endured. However, I can’t help but feel like the team is destined to fall just short, time and time again. It’s hard to pin down the weaknesses among the strengths. What exactly is it that Cloud 9 is missing?

 

Strengths

Photo Via Lolesports Flikr

Cloud 9 has always been able to team fight. When they joined the league they immediately rose to the top for three reasons.

The first was their mechanical prowess. It’s easily forgotten that at the offset Cloud 9 was considered a top-tier mechanical team. This was before Hai’s wrist issues.

The second was their ability to team fight. They would win nearly every team fight, often winning even when behind in gold.

Cloud 9 also had the x-factor of Hai. Hai was willing to make bold play calls and take risks in order to win, even when down. This often enabled his team to make comeback victories.

These three things combined to make them a dominant team in their first two splits. Cloud 9 had a combined record of 49-7 in their first two splits. They also took grand finals 3-0 both splits against TSM.

More recently the team has struggled at the last. However, they aren’t without their strengths. Jensen is widely regarded as a top two mid-laner. Some put him as the best in NA, but most think that he is second to TSM’s Bjergsen. He has great mechanical prowess and is often able to carry games. He is the superstar mid-laner for Cloud 9.

The bot lane also shows great strength. Sneaky and Smoothie have been consistently good throughout. Smoothie was named the best support in the league last split and Sneaky the second best ADC. Although they rarely display the level of hard carry prowess that Jensen does, they are more consistent. Their ceiling is high, but their floor isn’t far below it.

The top side of the map has shown some strength too. Contractz controls the early game and often ganks successfully to get his teammates ahead.  Impact has the ability to work with little resources yet still have a presence. Jensen can carry games more easily because he soaks up the resources that aren’t devoted to Impact. Impact’s positioning in team fights as well as his engages are second to none. Ray has also shown a lot of promise. His J4 has been deadly and has brought C9 out of a hole more than once this split already.

Weaknesses

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Where then are the weaknesses? If every player has his strengths, what is the team struggling with? In order to highlight it I’m going to compare them to TSM. The reason for this is because Cloud 9 continues to fall short to this team.

At first glance it’s easy to say that TSM’s players are just better. Bjergsen is the better Jensen, Doublelift is the better Sneaky, and Svenskeren the better Contractz. It might be that TSM has better players, but team play is much more important than individual prowess.

TSM is also more proactive. Their macro and rotations are very good domestically. They rarely make bad calls and when they do they often find ways to make up for them. Cloud 9 on the other hand seem to hesitate. They are no longer at the level of macro play that they were when Hai was at the helm. When they play against lesser teams Cloud 9 often make quick work of them. They carve out advantages in the early game and then make decisive calls and win team fights in the mid game. Against teams like TSM, Cloud 9 hesitates a bit, or gets out rotated. C9 is unable to carve out an advantage early game, or struggle to rotate swiftly in the mid game. Cloud 9 doesn’t look lost, just timid.

Solutions

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There most certainly is no one solution to Cloud 9’s problem. However, one thing that is missing from the Cloud 9 of old is that X factor. Hai’s ability to shot call and his ethos was Cloud 9’s X factor. Now that they have a team with great mechanical ability and great team fighting they are struggling to find their X factor. TSM has their’s in Bjergsen. His ethos and prowess has carried TSM to the finals time and time again. Cloud 9 is trying to emulate that in Jensen, but has fallen short two splits in a row, in game 5. It’s as if Cloud 9 is trying to beat TSM at their own game.

Jensen has been unable to pull it out in the clutch. It’d be a lot easier to argue that he is the best mid in NA if he was able to beat the current king when it was all on the line. Cloud 9 needs to find their new X factor. That unquantifiable thing that will push them to the championship.

 

Photos via Lolesports Flickr

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What C9 vs CLG Taught us

1) Rush is a God:
Little else needs to be said here. Rush was last’s splits MVP, and he has translated his individual skills to C9. With his super aggressive style of counterjungling, and his carry mentality, Rush has managed to carry C9 multiple times. Although they lost against CLG, he pulled many clutch Insect Kicks on priority targets that gave hope to C9 fans. Jensen put his hands on Le Blanc, a play making champion. However, it seems that all the highlights came from Rush, who made possible a C9 comeback.

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2) C9 is an incredible entertaining team to watch:
C9 has been the most entertaining team to watch this season. With few decisive victories, and few decisive defeats, C9 has made every game they played very entertaining to watch. Coupled with the fact that their games are usually close, C9 has many individual talented players who like to play champions with outplay potential.
C9 probably participated in the top three most exciting games to watch this season, making them an all around great team to watch.

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3) Hai’s shotcalling is not world-class anymore:

Hai was considered a strong individual player early in his career, it has been a long time since he has been considered a carry player or a strong individual player. It seems Bunnyfufu is much stronger individually than Hai is. Nonetheless, C9 necessitates Hai’s shotcalling, he has played three roles and has been unsuccessful individually in all of them.
In the game against CLG, Hai got caught a few times costing precious gold and time to his team. It is unfair to say it was his fault since Darshan was so far ahead of Balls, but one wonders how good Hai could be if he had better knowledge of the role. He has been playing the role for only ten weeks and is already showing that his shotcalling alone is enough to give him the starting position. Hai is a player to keep an eye on as he gets more comfortable in the role.
4) Split push is not as good as the other strategies:
It has been since season 3 where Jax was a split push monster and the strategy was widely used. With the addition of new objectives and fast-paced games, it seems that splitpush is a strategy that has not been strong for a long time now.
Darshan, whom was using Jax, was 2.5k gold ahead of Lulu, yet he had trouble getting any towers. My problem with split push strategies is that it is almost impossible to crack inhibitor towers split pushing alone in competitive gaming. Jax only cracked the inhibitor tower by dying to Le Blanc who recalled as Jax was getting the tower. As Jax died, Lulu teleported to the Baron pit and C9 got the Baron. Even though Jax managed to get the inhibitor tower it seems they gave more than what they got.
In my view, whenever there is a split push it seems that whoever wins the 4v4 wins the game, and that is why in my opinion splitpush strategies are not as strong unless a splitpush champion is OP, like Fiora is now.
5) C9 looks better with Hai:
Hai said in the post-game interview that he had made mistakes in the shotcalling. In the past, Hai barely ever made serious mistakes shotcalling. He was never the God of mid-lane, but his shotcalling was definitely world-class. His shot-calling is still one of the best, but changes in meta and role swaps made have altered his view on the game. His shotcalling form support role has not been as impressive, but as he adapts and learns the role, one can only expect good things to come .

Hai is still an essential piece in the C9 puzzle. That shows that C9 has a high skill-cap and they should continue to rapidly improve in the coming weeks as Hai gets more confortable in the support role.

 

courtesy of snsgamers.com and lolesports.com

Cloud 9 Spring Split Predictions

Courtesy of, n4g.com

Courtesy of, n4g.com

Perhaps the most lovable team in NA, C9 is coming off a Cinderella Worlds run that few will forget. After an absolutely horrible summer split, Hai returned to the team and led the team through the gauntlet and the first week of the group stage without a loss. Week 2 of the group stage was not quite so successful with C9 losing all 4 of their games and being knocked out of Worlds.

 

Since Worlds, support LemonNation has retired, and C9 opened up recruitment for a support or a jungler. For long time C9 fans, this was an exciting prospect. Hai has always been known as a world class shotcaller, but he has always had a tendency to play too aggressively, something that doesn’t bode well as a mid or jungler, but the thought of Hai in a support role just makes far more sense. Not long after C9 started looking, they announced that they would be signing the former TiP jungler Rush. They also signed Bunny FuFuu as a back up to Hai.

 

I’m using stats from the Gauntlet and Worlds to determine the following analysis, as C9’s play prior to Hai’s return is not representative of their true abilities.

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Balls: Balls takes a lot of negative criticism. It seems that Dyrus and Balls have always been the go to Tops to make fun of as “feeders.” But Balls managed to PentaKill the best team in Western history at Worlds, so maybe it’s time to take him seriously. As far as I’m concerned, C9 is a successful team because they play well consistently. They don’t have any superstar players that hard carry them, but they all play at the same high level, every game. Balls rarely does anything insanely huge during games, but he never tilts, and he always fills his role to a T.

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Rush: Rush is C9’s new pick-up and is therefore the most interesting one to watch. Rush is coming from a team where he and Impact had to go all out try-hard to carry. TiP is many things, but a fantastic team they are most certainly not. It will be exciting to see how Rush can play when he isn’t constantly carrying his team on his back. Rush and Jensen (Incarnati0n) have been duo queuing since C9 acquired him, and according to many, they are a duo to be reckoned with.

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Jensen: With a new summoner name, and his toxic past behind him, Jensen is a player to keep an eye on this season. While he wasn’t a particularly interesting player the past season, he was exactly what C9 needed him to be, consistent. He has a 70% Kill participation, and averages well over 300 CS per game on most of his main champions. With the expected Rush camp of mid lane, Jensen may become a much more important player this split.

C9_Sneaky_2014_WCS

Sneaky: Everyone agrees that Sneaky is the single most consistent ADC in all of LCS. I’ve been a C9 fan for a long time, and I’ve never seen Sneaky have a bad game. More so than any other player in the west, Sneaky never has a personal bad game. He has a massive champion pool (he played 11 different champions in 2015), and can be whatever his team needs him to be.

C9_Hai_2014_WCS

Hai: Hai is a world class shotcaller, and that debate was settled after he took a failing C9 and sent them on a massive winning streak to get through the Regional finals. Whether or not he is a world class support remains to be seen. Hai played a lot of Lee Sin while jungling, and proved that he is quite exceptional at hard engaging the enemy team, so hopefully that ability will translate into the support role. As a big C9 fan, this is a move that I’ve been in favor of since before Hai “retired.”

 

In their favor: They have a consistent team. No player on this squad will ever have an individually bad game. Hai is a fantastic shotcaller. Rush is a wild card, and may end up being a far better jungler than he was able to show while with TiP.

 

Against them: They have no hard carry. If an opposing team is making no mistakes, C9 rarely will take the risk to punish them. This often times turns into a very stale playstyle that never gets them anywhere. At Worlds they only really played one strategy, and after week one everyone knew what that strategy was, and they were easily defeated.

 

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C9 has a solid team. They don’t have many risk takers, and they have a good shotcaller. This should translate to a very successful season. They will struggle against TSM and Immortals, both of these teams have many hard carries and can potentially break through C9’s consistency, other than that I think they have an easy second place.