H2K are trending up in week six EU LCS

Trending in EU LCS: Week 6

The EU LCS returned this week after a brief hiatus to accommodate Rift Rivals. Since week five, Riot introduced patch 7.13 with several minor balance updates. Fans were able to see some adaptation in the various regional showdowns, but many European teams were able to experiment longer with the patch while Fnatic, Unicorns of Love and G2 played on the patch against representatives of the NA LCS.

Every new patch affects the meta. Every new meta affects teams’ performances. There were not too many huge shake-ups in the standings this week. However, week six does finish with some EU LCS elements trending up and others trending down.

Trending Up

These are the teams, players and gameplay factors that are on the upswing after week six of the EU LCS. They may have won a key series against a tough opponent. A teammate may have put their team on their back to keep it together. Maybe a particular champion pick was able to shine.

G2 are trending up after week six of EU LCS

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

G2

G2 bounces back from a disappointing Rift Rivals showing by defeating Splyce in a dominant 2-0. Perkz looked much more comfortable in the mid lane, ending the series with a 16-1-15 scoreline. Trick utilized Sejuani in the jungle in both games. All-in-all, G2’s wins were clean. For example, the second game was less than 24 minutes long, and the samurai accumulated a 10,000 gold advantage in that time. With Misfits’ loss to Unicorns of Love, G2 tie for second place in Group A with a 4-3 record.

H2K

H2K secured another 2-0 over a Group A team, Roccat. While the win is not unexpected, the sheer severity of Roccat’s losses show that H2K wants to be at the top of Group B at the end of the Summer Split. Game one ended in 26 minutes and game two in 21 minutes. H2K did not die a single time in game one, and only sacrificed two turrets. Roccat got five kills in game two, but only one turret. Nuclear and Chei did not die a single time over the course of the series. H2K has finished every winning series 2-0, and they have only lost games to UOL and Fnatic. They will look to solidify themselves as the third best team in Europe against G2 next week.

MM Kikis is trending up after week six of EU LCS

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

MM Kikis

Mysterious Monkeys picked up another series win this week against Roccat, but it was not pretty. Monkeys’ top laner, Kikis, came up huge in every single game to keep the team competitive. In game one it was a split-pushing Jayce. Game two was a mechanically intensive Akali, weaving between enemies, in and out of stealth. In game three it was an aggressive Renekton, finishing almost 4,000 gold over his lane opponent. While the Monkeys do not look too great as a team, Kikis is trying to be a menace in the top lane.

Cinderhulk junglers

The Enchantment: Cinderhulk jungle items were buffed because “while tanks are trying to farm Cinderhulk, everybody else around them is already farming more quickly,” according to the 7.13 patch notes. In response to this change, EU LCS junglers prioritized Gragas and Sejuani much higher than week five. Zac maintained his high ban rate, and was picked once by H2K’s Jankos. Olaf was locked in twice by Vitality’s Djoko. There were still other non-Cinderhulk junglers, such as Elise and Kha’Zix, but they were much less frequent.

Kalista ADC

The Spear of Vengeance has returned to the bottom lane in week six. While Kalista has seen a few lock-ins prior to this week, her play rate jumped this week. She was picked in seven out of 15 games, and banned in another three. This bump in pick and ban comes off the back of her strong showing at Rift Rivals, particularly the LCK-LPL-LMS showdown. Kalista enables her support to engage or disengage around her ultimate, Fate’s Call. Therefore, EU LCS bottom lanes paired her with Alistar, Rakan, Braum and Thresh. Finishing with four wins and three losses, she is not a guaranteed win, but Kalista will most likely continue to be a prioritized marksman pick.

Trending Down

These are the teams, players and gameplay factors that are on the downswing after week six of the EU LCS. They may have lost a series against an underdog. A teammate may have faltered over several games. Maybe the meta is shifting and a playstyle is being left in the past. These elements are downward trending in the EU LCS.

Splyce's bottom lane is trending down after week six EU LCS

Image from LoL Esports Flickr

Splyce bottom lane

Splyce lost 0-2 to G2 in their week six series, and none of their players looked particularly strong. One part of the map that looked weaker than usual was Splyce’s bottom lane duo, Kobbe and Mikyx. They ended the series with a combined 1-17-15 record playing Kalista-Rakan and Varus-Bard. In game one, G2’s Zven got a Triple Kill before 18 minutes, which included Kobbe and Mikyx. In game two, Zven killed Mikyx around five minutes, and Perkz killed Kobbe around seven minutes to start the snowball.

Roccat

Roccat finishes week six with two series losses against H2K and Mysterious Monkeys. This is going to heavily hinder their chance to make playoffs. H2K completely demolished them in two sub-27-minute games. Roccat lost large early leads in games one and two against the Monkeys. Luckily, they were able to bring it back in game two. However, they still lost game three in convincing fashion. Roccat’s record falls to 2-6, two games ahead of Ninjas in Pyjamas and two games behind G2.

Top lane Galio is trending down in week six of EU LCS

Image from LeagueofLegends.com

Galio top

While he was not completely relegated from professional play in the EU LCS, Galio was not drafted into the top lane this week. Tanks and bruisers, such as Renekton, Jarvan IV, Kled, Jax and Gnar were prioritized more. Galio’s armor was reduced in patch 7.13, which made him particularly weak against these AD threats. He may remain as a mid lane niche pick, as he was drafted by UOL’s Exileh and NIP’s Nagne in week six.

Lee Sin jungle

Unlike Galio, Lee Sin was not targeted in patch 7.13 at all. However, Enchantment: Cinderhulk, Rek’Sai and Kha’Zix were all changed in ways that negatively impacted Lee Sin. He was picked once by H2K’s Jankos and once by MM’s Amazing. Graves and Kindred were both picked while Lee Sin was still available. Olaf and Elise were played just as many times, or more. While Lee Sin is almost always a possible pick in professional League of Legends, he seems to have taken a back seat in the EU LCS for the time being.


Featured Image: LoL Esports Flickr

Other Images: LoL Esports Flickr, LeagueofLegends.com

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How I got Level 6 Mastery with Nasus, and Why it’s Still Meaningless

So for those of you who have read my pieces before, I’m Silver 5 and play pretty much every role. I have level 5 mastery on around 7 or 8 champions, and I get S ratings in about 30% of my games (depending on how hard I’m tilted). So I guess the point of this introduction is that my expectation was that without consistently playing a role, and with the limited number of S ratings I get, I didn’t expect to get a Mastery Level 6 champion for quite some time.(courtesy of ddragon.leagueoflegends.com)

Now don’t get me wrong, I’m a pretty good Nasus. I’ve been known to put up 700-900 stacks in a standard 40-50 minute game, and I’ve broken 1000 stacks more than a couple times. I can win lane against a Garen/Riven/Teemo etc. But even still I typically only see A- or A’s. (I have a tendency to get caught out while split pushing). But imagine my surprise when it took me 2 games to get the necessary S’s for Level 6. How did I do it? URF.

Last weekend URF was upon us (in all its glory), and I figured I’d play Nasus. Nasus can easily stack with a less than 2 second cooldown on his Q. He can almost always escape with Wither on a less than 7 second cooldown, his E allows him to have constant AOE damage in lane and its debuff helps his Q hit harder, and his ult (which is up every 20 seconds or so) makes him virtually impossible to kill late game. So all one has to do is walk to lane, focus on Q-Smacking minions while zoning opponents away with W and E, and you have a recipe for an easy 300 stacks at 15 minutes. In my experience that’s pretty much all it takes to have complete dominance over the majority of champions. Nasus can easily spam Q/E to quickly take Rift Herald or Dragon to increase his power further, and he can 5 hit towers once he gets over 500 stacks.

In URF, Nasus is almost a free S (if you have a basic understanding of how to play him anyway). So I quickly played 2 games of Ultra Rapid Fire Nasus, paid the blue essence toll, and now have a nice purple Level 6 Mastery.

 

This doesn’t seem like what Riot intended. Nasus is by no means the most powerful URF champion: nerfplz.com (my standard for tier lists) places him in tier 3, and suggests that he is well balanced within the game mode. For people playing Alistar, or Evelynn achieving an S is as easy as mashing Q and being in the right place at the right time. Which means Level 6 and 7 mastery is easy.

 

Not every Rotating Game Mode will give Free S’s, but I anticipate seeing URF at least once a month for the rest of the year, and seeing as it only really takes 5 S games to get a champion from level 5 to 7, I think I could easily have 10-15 Level 7 champions by the end of the year. To me that makes these new mastery levels almost entirely meaningless. I’m a “fill” main, if the mastery levels were legitimate and actually based on skill on a champion over time (similar to the ranked system), I would probably be a Level 4 or 5 on almost every champion in the game, but I don’t think I’d have a 7 on any of them. I think the system would be more worthwhile if rather then a 1-7 scale, our champion mastery was our average letter grade on that champion in standard 5v5 matches with a reset at the beginning of each season.

Maybe its just me, but I want my mastery to mean something.