Rocket League on Switch: Impressions and discussion

November 14 saw the release of a port of Rocket League on Nintendo Switch. Ever since the port’s announcement at E3 this year, many have been looking forward to playing Rocket League on Nintendo’s new handheld-console hybrid. On paper, the game seems like a perfect fit for the system. A portable system such as the Nintendo Switch is perfect for playing in shorter sessions. Having a competitive game such as Rocket League on the Switch can help introduce the game to an entirely new audience. Additionally, more competitive players can play the Switch version of the game on the go, allowing them to practice whenever and wherever they are.

But does the Switch version of Rocket League hold up? Let’s delve into our impressions of the port, and discuss what the Switch version of Rocket League could mean for the game’s future.

Impressions of the Nintendo Switch Port

First and foremost, the Nintendo Switch version of the game is a competent port. The game itself runs at a consistent 60 frames per second (fps). However, over the course of my three hours of playtime, there have been isolated frame stutters here and there. For the most part though, the game remains at a solid 60 fps. The port achieves this through using a dynamic resolution.

impressions

The Switch version of the game (left) has a lower resolution and lower-res textures than the PC version (right), but the Switch version still looks good. Image: YouTube

In an AMA on Reddit, Psyonix provided specs for the Switch version of the game. When docked, the game outputs at 720p.

When undocked, the game uses a dynamic resolution scaler, going anywhere from 526p to 720p, in order to maintain a consistent 60 fps.

Whether docked or undocked, Rocket League on the Nintendo Switch looks quite nice. This isn’t to say that there are a few small issues. For example, explosions from demolitions look quite pixelated. Another example is the pixelation on the Rocket League signs around stadiums. But for the most part, Rocket League looks good and runs well on Switch. Some compromises are made to keep a smooth frame rate, but overall, the Switch version of Rocket League is a well-made port, and a great way to play the game.

The game itself features all modes seen in other versions of the game. Moreover, the Switch version of the game features cross-play with PC and Xbox One players.

As for Nintendo-exclusive content, Mario, Luigi and Metroid themed cars look good and their sound effects all have nice attention to detail (special mention to the 8-bit jump sound effect on the Mario and Luigi cars when they jump). Other than the difference in resolution and the visual quality of textures and some Nintendo-exclusive cars and hats, the Switch version of the game is as potent and playable as any other version of the game.

The portability of Rocket League on Switch

Without a doubt, the coolest thing about playing Rocket League on Nintendo Switch is that it’s on the Nintendo Switch. Unlike the console and PC versions of the game, the Switch versions allows Rocket League players to enjoy the game whenever and wherever they are. And for the type of game that Rocket League is, this feels right at home on a handheld-console hybrid.

impressions

The glory of the Switch version of the game is that you can play wherever, and however you want. Image: YouTube.

This raises curiosity as to how this version of the game may impact the greater community of Rocket League. Unlike other versions, the Switch version of the game can allow players to practice the game whether or not they are near a television or monitor. The only stipulation to playing the game in undocked mode on the Switch is the slightly-lower resolution. Playing Rocket League on an undocked Switch still offers the full Rocket League experience.

Could this possibly invite more players to want to put more hours into the game? That could be likely. Since the Switch version of the game doesn’t demand to be played near a television or monitor, players could get better at the game at any time. Speaking anecdotally, I’ve been able to play and improve at the game just by playing it while on the go. This could be replicated by just about any Rocket League player on Switch.

An easy recommendation to all Switch Owners

This port of Rocket League can only be good for the game in the long run. It will help introduce many new people to the game, and give previous players the option to play the game wherever they are, whether they’re competitive or casual. In appeasing both new and old players of Rocket League, the Nintendo Switch version feels like one of the most definitive ways to play Rocket League. While it doesn’t look as pretty as other console versions and especially the PC version, the Switch port of Rocket League is a great way to play the game.

If the Nintendo Switch version can introduce more people to Rocket League, then it can also lead more people to play Rocket League competitively. Just having the game be portable makes getting into the more competitive nature of the game feel all the more possible. Not only can this version help make Rocket League grow as a game, but the Nintendo Switch can also possibly help the game grow as an esport.

All year, the Nintendo Switch has been selling very well. With that, there are many games on the system worth getting. After spending a few hours with the game on Switch, it’s safe to say that Rocket League is one of the essential games to get on the Nintendo Switch.

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Featured Image courtesy of Nintendo Enthusiast.

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predictions

RLCS playoff predictions

League play for season four of the Rocket League Championship Series and Rocket League Rival Series came to an end last weekend for North America and Europe. With that, it’s time to look at predictions for the upcoming promotion/relegation tournament as well as playoff predictions. Here are the RLCS standings for NA and EU after league play:

 

 NA

  1. Cloud9 6-1
  2. G2 Esports 6-1
  3. Ghost 5-2
  4. NRG Esports 4-3
  5. Rogue 3-4
  6. FlyQuest 2-5
  7. Allegiance 1-6
  8. Renegades 1-6

 EU

  1. Method 6-1
  2. PSG eSports 6-1
  3. Gale Force eSports 5-2
  4. Mockit eSports 4-3
  5. exceL 3-4
  6. Flipsid3 Tactics 2-5
  7. Team Envy 2-5
  8. Team Secret 0-7
playoff predictions

Image courtesy of wiki.teamliquid.net

Seeds seven and eight for both NA and EU are no longer competing in season four. They are currently in the midst of fighting for the last two seeds moving into season five. The round-robin promotion/relegation tournament is underway. The top two teams from the RLRS in both regions are also competing in said tournament. Those teams include Fibeon and Out of Style for NA, along with Fnatic and The Juicy Kids for EU.

I’ll give you my predictions for the promotion/relegation tournament results before we move onto the rest of season four. In the end, for NA, I’m expecting to see Fibeon and Renegades in season five of the RLCS, with Out of Style remaining in the RLRS and Allegiance moving down to join them. As for EU, I expect to see Fnatic promoted to the RLCS alongside Team Envy retaining their spot, while The Juicy Kids remain where they are and Team Secret is relegated back.

These are certainly the safer predictions when it comes to the promotion/relegation tournament. That being said, they’re safe for a reason. I’ll throw all of you Brandon “Lachinio” Lachin fans a bone and say Out of Style has the potential to come out on top over Renegades, relegating them back to the RLRS.

Now onto the remainder of this season.

NA

The fight for top four in NA was a close one all season. With top two still up for grabs at the start of week five, each of the top four teams had a viable shot at clinching one of those spots. As we now know, Cloud9 and G2 are the teams that managed to pull it off. Cloud9 was no surprise, considering the incredible season they had. I admit, I wasn’t expecting G2 to clinch that other spot.

playoff predictions

Image courtesy of play.esea.net

We’re guaranteed to see Cloud9 and G2 at the world finals this year, but who will the other two NA teams be? Here’s what we’ll see in round one of the NA playoffs: NRG versus Rogue and Ghost versus FlyQuest.

These are certain to be close matches. That being said, my NA playoff predictions are NRG over Rogue and Ghost over FlyQuest. I’m picking NRG over Rogue simply because of the team chemistry here. NRG won the last three NA regional championships and I’m looking to see them pick up number four.

As for Ghost over FlyQuest, the decision is a bit more difficult. FlyQuest looked strong all season, despite ending with a 2-5 record. And let’s not forget Kais “Sadjunior” Zehri made it to every LAN from previous seasons. But, as analyst Michael “Quinn Lobdell” Behrouzi said on RLCS Overtime, there’s a first time for everything. And this might be the first time Sadjunior doesn’t make it to the world championships. I say that because Ghost has looked phenomenal in season four. Despite going in with the number three seed, they could have easily been a top two team.

EU

playoff predictions

Image courtesy of excelesports.com

As we’ve seen all season long, EU is a bit more of an emotional roller coaster for Rocket League fans. Team Envy, formerly Northern Gaming when they won the season three world championships, now sit in the seventh seed. Meaning their season is done. They’re currently fighting for their season five RLCS spot in the promotion/relegation tournament. Gale Force eSports and Flipsid3 Tactics, two other highly anticipated teams at the beginning of season four, are sitting in the number three and six seeds respectively. Needless to say, EU’s had an unexpected season.

That being said, there’s still time for Gale Force and Flipsid3 Tactics, as they look forward to playoffs. Here’s round one of the EU playoffs: Mockit eSports versus exceL and Flipsid3 Tactics versus Gale Force esports.

Now just because Flipsid3 and Gale Force are both looking to keep the dream alive doesn’t mean they’ll both get to. There’s only four EU spots at the world finals, meaning only two up for grabs. One of these two teams’ seasons will come to an end after this weekend.

Here are my EU playoff predictions. ExceL over Mockit eSports and Gale Force over Flipsid3 Tactics, and here’s why.

ExceL had a rough season three, under the name Cow Nose. However, in the off season, the squad dropped Danny “DanzhizzLe” Smol and replaced him with Kasper “Pwndx” Nielsen. They came into season four by securing a spot in qualifiers, and they’ve looked strong ever since.

GFE versus F.3

As for Flipsid3 Tactics and Gale Force eSports, it promises to be nail biter. All six of the players that make up these two starting rosters are veterans of not only the RLCS, but the world championship stage. They’ll all surely be eager to make it back to that stage as well. Flipsid3 Tactics, time and time again, have come up through one loser’s bracket or another to turn their position in a tournament around. They are essentially in that same position now, securing the sixth and final playoff seed. However, I have to give this one to Gale Force.

This Gale Force eSports squad formed after season two. Courant “Kaydop” Alexandre left Mockit eSports after winning the season three regional championships. Had he stayed with Mockit and one other member of that roster from season three, he would have been guaranteed a spot in this season of the RLCS. Despite that, he left to join Jos “ViolentPanda” van Meurs on Gale Force. Their third, Pierre “Turbopolsa” Silfver, has a similar story.

playoff predictions

Image courtesy of @GFEsports Twitter account.

Since then, they’ve been a force to reckon with. Although they had somewhat of a second place curse during the off season, until the NBC Universal Open, they were still coming in at least second consistently. Now they’re looking for yet another first place win in a LAN environment.

So, there you have it, here are the eight NA and EU teams I expect to see in the world championships:

 

 NA

  • Cloud9
  • G2
  • NRG
  • Ghost

 EU

  • Method
  • PSG eSports
  • exceL
  • Gale Force

 



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top two

RLCS: Fighting for top two

This weekend we move into the fifth and final week of North American and European league play for season four of the Rocket League Championship Series and Rocket League Rival Series. As we look ahead, the fight to secure a top two spot is a tight one, especially in North America.

The top six teams in NA and EU RLCS, at the end of league play, qualify for playoffs. Not only that, the top six secure their spot in season five of the RLCS. More importantly, they avoid the stress of facing off in the promotion/relegation tournament to try to remain in the upper division. Most teams are looking to secure a top six spot at this point, but there are a select few still aiming for a higher goal: clinching a top two spot.

As always, before we take a look at what we might see, here’s where the standings are now.

Standings

 

 NA

  1. Cloud9 4-1
  2. Ghost 4-1
  3. G2 Esports 4-1
  4. NRG Esports 4-2
  5. Rogue 3-3
  6. FlyQuest 2-4
  7. Renegades 1-5
  8. Allegiance 0-5

 EU

  1. PSG eSports 6-0
  2. Method 5-1
  3. Gale Force eSports 4-2
  4. exceL 3-2
  5. Mockit eSports 2-3
  6. Team Envy 1-4
  7. Flipsid3 Tactics 1-5
  8. Team Secret 0-5

Top two

top two

Image courtesy of en.wikipedia.org

While it’s not an achievable goal for some teams at this point, teams at the top of their leaderboards are still aiming for a top two spot. While top six guarantees your spot in playoffs and season five of the RLCS, top two guarantees a trip to the season four world championships.

PSG eSports currently holds the record for the most wins during league play of the RLCS. If they win their match in week five, against Team Envy, they will be the only team to go undefeated in RLCS league play history. Not only that, PSG eSports is the only team to already clinch a top two league play spot.

Although PSG eSports is guaranteed a shot at the world championships, they’re still looking to secure that number one seed moving into the world championships. So, don’t expect this squad to slow down during playoffs.

EU top two teams

Since we already know that PSG eSports has nailed down their top two spot, let’s take a look at the other contenders for EU top two, beginning, of course, with Method.

Method is the most likely team in EU to snag up the other top two position. Sitting at 5-1, their only loss currently is to PSG eSports.

top two

Image courtesy of @Methodgg Twitter account

Heading into week four, Method and PSG eSports were both 4-0. Method won their first match of week four against Mockit eSports, putting them at 5-0 before their match against PSG eSports. They set the record for most wins in league play of the RLCS. However, it was short lived, as the very same day PSG beat Method and exceL to go 6-0 and take that record away.

While Method has been on fire all season, there are two other contenders: Gale Force eSports and exceL.

Gale Force sat at number five in the EU standings heading into week four. They took down Flipsid3 Tactics and Mockit eSports, both in five games, bumping them up to number three in the standings. Gale Force eSports is looking to beat Team Envy, as well as for exceL to beat Method and lose to Mockit eSports, in order to clinch a number two spot.

ExceL, on the other hand, is looking to beat Method and Mockit eSports, with Gale Force eSports losing to Team Envy, in order to clinch the number two spot for themselves.

NA top two teams

top two

Image courtesy of wiki.teamliquid.net

The race for top two in NA is much closer than in EU, particularly because no team has clinched one of those spots yet. Right now, Cloud9, Ghost and G2 Esports sit in the top three, respectively. They all have four wins and one loss. Their positioning in the top three, since they are tied in matches, is determined by game win percentage. Along with these three, NRG sits at number four with four wins and two losses.

There are a number of different scenarios for how the fight for top two will play out in week five. Mostly because Ghost faces off against G2 Esports and Cloud9 faces off against NRG. That being said, don’t be surprised when the top two spots come down to a tie breaker, determined by each teams win percentage.

Predictions

Below are my predictions for who will clinch the remaining three top two spots after league play this weekend.

top two

Image courtesy of play.esea.net

For EU, I have to give this one to Method. As mentioned above, they’ve been on fire all season. With only one loss to the currently undefeated PSG eSports, they have what it takes to come out on top over exceL this weekend.

NA is a bit trickier. Here’s what I’d like to see happen: Rogue beats Ghost, G2 beats Allegiance, Ghost beats G2, Cloud9 beats Renegades and NRG beats Cloud9. If I’m doing my math right, this scenario puts the current top four teams all at 5-2, leaving top two entirely up to the game-win percentage.

Now, here’s what the realistic side of me predicts for NA top two: Cloud9 and Ghost.

We will have our answers this weekend in the final week of league play for season four of the RLCS.


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playoffs

RLCS: looking ahead to playoffs

The Rocket League Championship Series and Rocket League Rival Series are past the half-way mark for season four league play. It’s time for a peek at what playoffs may hold in store, as we move into the last two weeks of North American and European league play.

Standings

First and foremost, here are the current standings after week three of league play:

 

 NA

  1. Cloud9 4-1
  2. NRG Esports 3-1
  3. G2 Esports 2-1 (7-5 games)
  4. Ghost 2-1 (6-6 games)
  5. FlyQuest 2-2 (8-8 games)
  6. Rogue 2-2 (8-8 games)
  7. Renegades 1-3
  8. Allegiance 0-5

 EU

  1. Method 4-0 (12-5 games)
  2. PSG eSports 4-0 (12-5 games)
  3. exceL 2-1 (7-3 games)
  4. Mockit eSports 2-1 (8-5 games)
  5. Gale Force eSports 2-2
  6. Flipsid3 Tactics 1-3
  7. Team Envy 1-4
  8. Team Secret 0-5

As I predicted at the beginning of the season, Allegiance and Team Secret, then Emotion and Aeriality, have all but solidified their spots in the bottom two of the RLCS. Both sit at 0-5 with two matches remaining. These teams have their bye weeks coming up in week four and will return for their final matches of league play in week five.

While there is a chance each of these teams can clinch number six and move on to playoffs instead of their promotion/relegation tournaments, it’s not looking promising.

Playoffs Clinched

Three teams, across NA and EU, have already clinched their top six spot, guaranteeing a shot at playoffs as well as auto-qualification for season five of the RLCS. These teams are Cloud9, Method and PSG eSports.

Cloud9

playoffs

Image courtesy of wiki.teamliquid.net.

Cloud9 was perhaps the most highly anticipated newcomers to the RLCS this season. The Cloud9 roster consists of Jesus “Gimmick” Parra, Mariano “SquishyMuffinz” Arruda and Kyle “Torment” Storer, and of these three players, Torment is the only one to compete in a previous season of the RLCS.

Despite a lack of prior RLCS experience, Gimmick and, especially, Squishy, came riding into season four on a hype train. Squishy’s been prominent in the community for quite some time through streaming, known for his next-level mechanical skill. That being said, it was at DreamHack Atlanta 2017 that this roster really made a name for themselves.

Playing under the name The Muffin Men, these three showed up to DreamHack Atlanta to take on some of NA and EU’s biggest name teams. They took first place and were quickly picked up by Cloud9. At DreamHack Atlanta and since, Gimmick continues to build the hype around his name, showing the world that he’s ready to take on the top Rocket League players just as much, if not more, than Squishy and Torment.

Method and PSG eSports

Both Method and PSG eSports sit undefeated at the top of the EU leaderboard. With only three games left to play, these two tames have already guaranteed their top six position.

playoffs

Image courtesy of en.wikipedia.org.

Many expected both Method and PSG to do relatively well, even considering the stiff competition in EU. They’ve managed to continue to perform above expectations.

Method is the only EU squad from season three of the RLCS to retain their entire starting roster. They’re showing everyone just how deadly that long-term team chemistry can be. PSG, on the other hand, is showing everyone just how deadly an untried roster can be.

Despite their 4-0 standings right now, these teams will finally meet up in week four, guaranteeing an end to at least one of their undefeated seasons. All things considered though, it’s looking more and more promising that these two teams will come out of league play with the number one and two seeds. It’s tough to predict, but I’m expecting to see PSG come out in the number one seed.

Promotion/Relegation

When Psyonix announced the Rocket League Rival Series, they also announced a Promotion/Relegation tournament which will take place the weekend after league play finish. The bottom two teams from each region of the RLCS will play a round-robin style tournament with the top two teams from the RLRS in their respective regions.

To no surprise, as mentioned above, the current bottom teams in NA and EU are Allegiance and Team Secret respectively. Both sitting at 0-5, it’s difficult to imagine either clinching a top six spot at this point. However, the real interest is around who will wind up in seventh for each region. Right now, that’s Renegades for NA and Team EnVy for EU.

Renegades

Although it’s somewhat surprising to see Renegades out of the top six currently, they were never expected to be a top two, or perhaps even top four, team. That being said, they aren’t in deep water just yet.

Renegades, 1-3, sit just behind Rogue, 2-2, on the NA leaderboard. These two teams will come together for a match in week four. On top of playing each other, Renegades are set to play Ghost and Rogue are set to play G2 Esports. If Renegades are able to secure a win against Rogue and Ghost, and Rogue falls to G2, then Renegades could easily move up to that number six spot. This isn’t an unlikely scenario, but Rogue certainly has other plans.

The current number seven seed across the pond faces some tougher odds than the Renegades.

Team EnVy

Team EnVy is the reigning world champion from season three, the roster playing then for Northern Gaming. One of their starters, Nicolai “Maestro” Bang, was unable to attend the world championships and was then on vacation for much of the off season. As a result, Team EnVy dropped Maestro and picked up Marius “gReazymeister” Ranheim, whom they’d spent much of the off season playing with.

playoffs

Image courtesy of @TeamEnVyUs Twitter account.

There were certainly doubts when the iconic Maestro and Remco “Remkoe” den Boer duo split up. That being said, there was also a lot of anticipation for the addition of gReazymeister, as Remkoe, Maestro and gReazy made up the starting Northern Gaming squad in season one of the RLCS.

However, those doubts and concerns are winning out over the anticipation. Team EnVy sits at 1-4. Although they aren’t currently too far behind Flipsid3 Tactics, who sit at 1-3, Team Envy is the one win that Flipsid3 has so far.

Considering Remkoe’s Twitter responses to their losses after week two, I imagine this squad won’t stick together if they’re relegated to the RLRS. Even they do come out on top of Relegation/Promotion tournament, I still expect to see a roster change, since teams are only required to maintain two-thirds of their starting roster to retain auto-qualification.

Be sure to keep checking back for more info on playoffs and the world championships as season four of the RLCS and RLRS draws closer to the end of league play.


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week two

RLCS/RLRS week two recap: Europe

Season four of the Rocket League Championship Series and Rocket League Rival Series are heading into week three. After week two, here are the standings, upsets and what to look out for moving forward.

If you missed it, take a look at the week two recap for North America.

Standings

 RLCS

  • Method 4-0
  • Frontline 2-0
  • Gale Force eSports 2-2
  • Flipsid3 Tactics 1-1
  • Team EnVyUs 1-2
  • Mockit eSports 0-1
  • exceL eSports 0-1
  • Team Secret 0-3

 RLRS

  • The Leftovers 3-0
  • The Juicy Kids 3-1
  • ExRay 1-0
  • Inspiration 1-2
  • Endpoint 0-1
  • Supersonic Avengers 0-1
  • Most Wanted Esports 0-1
  • Golden Hawks 0-2

As with NA, EU has some clear leaders in both the RLCS and RLRS after only two weeks. Those leaders in the RLRS, to no surprise, are The Leftovers and The Juicy Kids.

Upsets

The Leftovers’ relegation to the RLRS, after losing to Team Secret (then Aeriality) in the loser’s bracket of the Play-Ins, was unexpected. The Leftovers’ founder, Nicolai “Snaski” Vistessen Andersen, promptly tweeted about showing everyone they don’t belong in the RLRS. Since then, they’ve shown why.

The real surprises after week two, heading into week three, come from the RLCS.

Method

This Method roster has been playing together since season three of the RLCS, playing then for Resonant Esports. The squad consists of Linus “al0t” Möllergren, Otto “Metsanauris” Kaipiainen and Joonas “Mognus” Salo.

week two

Image courtesy of @Methodgg Twitter account.

As Resonant, they came in sixth during League Play of RLCS season three and missed out on the World Championships after losing to Flipsid3 Tactics in the first round of playoffs. Despite missing LANs, the trio stuck together and moved from Resonant to Method.

As seen in throughout the history of the RLCS, trios and duos who stick together for multiple seasons often do better than many teams that formed for the season. Method is not only proving that so far this season, they’re showing that trios sticking together might be stronger than threes team with a long-time duo.

Method was hard at work during the off season, consistently competing in season one of Gfinity’s Elite Series and the European Gfinity Weekly Cups, and it has shown. They were easily accepted as a top six team coming into League Play but are quickly showing everyone that they have the potential to be much more than that.

Frontline

week two

Image courtesy of wiki.teamliquid.net.

The other surprising team in EU right now is Frontline. While Frontline had a bye week in week two, they still sit at number two in the standings after week one.

Frontline consists of Dan “Bluey” Bluett, Thibault “Chausette45” Grzesiak and Victor “Ferra” Francal.

Ferra, a former member of The Leftovers during season three, knocked his old squad into the loser’s bracket during Play-Ins, securing their spot in the RLCS this season. After their performance during Play-Ins, many expected them to do well. So far they’re doing great.

In week one, Frontline took down two top-tier teams, Mockit eSports and Gale Force eSports. While Mockit lost their auto-qualification bid from season three, due to losing two-thirds of their starting line-up, they still managed to find their way into the RLCS. The real shock here, though, is the victory over Gale Force eSports.

Gale Force eSports was on fire this off season, despite seemingly having a second-place curse until NBC Universal Open. The star-studded Gale Force squad consists of Courant “Kaydop” Alexandre, Pierre “Turbopolsa” Silfver and Jos “ViolentPanda” van Meurs. They were considered the favorites to win EU regionals, and perhaps worlds, at the beginning of league play.

Coming off their bye week, Frontline is looking to continue their undefeated streak and match Method’s 4-0 standing. They are set to play Team Secret and Flipsid3 Tactics in week three. Frontline and Method face off in week four.

Moving into week 3

In NA, the two teams with only one series played so far, G2 Esports and Ghost Gaming, find themselves undefeated. That’s not the case in EU. Both Mockit eSports and exceL are 0-1 so far for the season. While they aren’t looking to continue an undefeated season, as with G2 and Ghost, they are looking to turn their seasons around.

Mockit

week two

Image courtesy of wiki.teamliquid.net

Mockit consists of Victor “Fairy Peak” Locquet, Sandro “FreaKii” Holzwarth and Philip “paschy90” Paschmeyer.

Mockit has been an ever-present force since the beginning of RLCS, despite constantly changing rosters during off seasons. While they are looking to turn their season around in week three, it certainly won’t be easy. Mockit is scheduled to play Flipsid3 Tactics and EnVyUs, both considered powerhouses of EU. Flipsid3 Tactics were the world champions of season two and EnVyUs, then Northern Gaming, the world champions of season three. The other major powerhouse being Gale Force eSports.

However, as the first two weeks have shown, anything can happen in EU Rocket League. Gale Force, Flipsid3 Tactics and EnVyUs were expected to be top three, in varying orders depending who you ask, coming into season four. However, they currently sit at three, four and five, respectively.

exceL

The exceL squad is my personal EU team to keep an eye on this season. Consisting of Niels “Nielskoek” Kok, Kasper “Pwndx” Nielsen and Hampus “Zensuz” Öberg, these players aren’t strangers to the RLCS.

ExceL has a somewhat easier turnaround week coming than Mockit. Although they are playing EnVyUs in their first match of the day, their second match is against Team Secret.

I expect the match against EnVyUs to be much closer than that of the one against Team Secret. Not to put Team Secret down, but it was a shock they made it into the RLCS this season, and they have yet to prove they belong, sitting at 0-3.

No matter what happens, EU has already flipped expectations on their heads. There’s no reason to assume they won’t do it again as the season moves forward.


You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Ryan McElroy.

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week two

RLCS/RLRS week two recap: North America

It’s time to take a look back at week two of season four of the Rocket League Championship Series and Rocket League Rival Series. From standings and upsets to the drama surrounding the rookie squad Naventic, let’s dive in and find out what’s been happening.

Standings

 

 RLCS

  • Cloud9 3-0
  • NRG Esports 3-1
  • Rogue 2-2
  • G2 Esports 1-0
  • Ghost Gaming 1-0
  • FlyQuest 0-2
  • Renegades 0-2
  • Allegiance 0-3

 RLRS

  • Fibeon 3-0
  • Naventic 2-0
  • Premature Superhero Cops 2-2
  • Radiance 1-0
  • Ambition Esports 0-1
  • Out Of Style 0-1
  • Incognito 0-1
  • Kinematics 0-3

There are some clear leaders in both the RLCS and RLRS at the moment. There’s still plenty of time for some of the lower ranked teams to make their way back, though. G2 Esports and Ghost Gaming, in the RLCS, have only played one series so far. The same goes for Radiance, Ambition Esports, Out Of Style and Incognito in the RLRS.

G2 Esports and Ghost Gaming

week two

Image courtesy of @G2esports Twitter account.

G2 Esports and Ghost Gaming are looking for a strong presence in the coming weeks of the RLCS. Since they’ve each only played one series, their opportunities to rise in the standings are still in front of them. However, they have some major hurdles ahead.

Coming up in week three, both G2 and Ghost are playing the only other undefeated team in NA RLCS, Cloud9. This means at least two of these three teams will no longer be undefeated after week three.

Both teams have a tough week ahead, playing the favorite, for many, to win the NA regional championships. On the other hand, they are also both playing teams that have yet to secure a win this season. All things considered though, I would say G2 has the tougher week three.

The other teams G2 and the Ghost are playing in week three are FlyQuest and Allegiance, respectively.

Flyquest

FlyQuest, despite sitting at 0-2, is a strong team consisting of some of the world’s best players. The lineup consists of Robert “Chrome” Gomez, Gabriel “CorruptedG” Vallozzi and Kais “Sadjunior” Zehri, all of which are RLCS veterans. FlyQuest lost their first series of the season by reverse sweep, in week two, to Rogue. They lost their second series, 3-0, to Cloud9. Although they were reverse swept and then swept in their first two match-ups of the season, they were playing two of the top rated teams North America. Allegiance, on the other hand, is not quite as star-studded as the FlyQuest squad.

Allegiance

Allegiance’s roster, formerly Emotion at the beginning of the season, consists of Braxton “Allushin,” Sebastian “Sea-Bass” Becerra and Ty “TyNotTyler” Helewa. Although Allegiance came barreling through the loser’s bracket of Play-Ins, they weren’t expected to make it to the RLCS.

week two

Image courtesy of halo.esportswikis.com

 

They upset Fibeon, a team expected to make it to the RLCS, during Play-Ins, relegating them to the RLRS and securing their own spot in the RLCS. They’ve yet to prove they belong in the RLCS, sitting at 0-3 so far. On top of this, they’ve only found themselves winning two total games throughout these three series.

So, it’s FlyQuest’s experience, coupled with Allegiance’s inexperience and inability to prove themselves so far that leaves G2 with a more difficult week three, in terms of climbing the leaderboard. Although FlyQuest has yet to prove themselves this season as well, each of the FlyQuest squad members proved they belong in the RLCS during previous seasons.

Upsets

As always, the RLCS is full of upsets so far, just take a look back at this article discussing Play-Ins and the beginning of season four. While Europe has been and continues to be the region of upsets, NA saw it’s first huge upset of season four League Play during week two.

In the second series of the day, NRG Esports faced off against Ghost Gaming. NRG won the previous three NA regional championships and continue to remain one of the top teams in the world, let alone in NA. Ghost Gaming took these goliaths down in a four-game series, however. NRG took the first game in the series but found themselves unable to secure any other wins against the Ghost squad.

Although this is Ghost’s only series so far, and NRG’s only loss so far, Ghost is certainly a team to keep an eye on during the rest of the season and potentially the future. This is no surprise, considering this squad formed for season four is full of RLCS veterans.

Naventic

A matter which is currently still in the process of unfolding…

After week two, Naventic sits just behind Fibeon in the standings at 2-0. Fibeon is currently 3-0. That being said, it’s likely viewers won’t be seeing this Naventic squad anymore during season four, or perhaps ever.

The team consists of Tanner “Dooble” Toupin, Adam “Kerupt” Stankovic and Jay “King Wizard” Kidston. As of Wednesday, Psyonix and the official esports coordinators for the RLCS have not made any official statements, but  here’s what we do know from Kerupt and Naventic’s Twitter accounts.

week two

Image courtesy of @Naventic Twitter account.

Naventic announced Tuesday, via Twitter, that “Kerupt, Dooble and KingWizard will no longer be representing #NaventicRL in the #RLRS Season 4 – more information will be released soon.”

With only this information, it may appear that the esports organization is simply dropping the squad. There’s a bit more, however.

Kerupt offered a bit more information on the topic in a tweet on Tuesday. He stated the team “had to either forfeit ro128 or risk using a sub not on the roster… chose the latter and played with atomic.”

Kerupt has since replied to Twitter users saying that a statement should be out soon regarding the situation.

Since the team used an illegal substitute during the Play-Ins, it’s likely they’ll be banned, for at least the rest of the season, for breaking the rules.

This could create an interesting rest of season for the teams in the RLRS. The Naventic squad was sitting undefeated in the number two spot of the standings. The top two teams from NA RLRS will play the bottom two teams from NA RLCS at the end of League Play in a promotion/relegation tournament. Not only that, the teams in third and fourth keep their spot in the RLRS for season five. Naventic potentially getting banned would, essentially, move everyone up a spot in the standings.

Be sure to check back tomorrow for week two recap of EU.


You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Ryan McElroy.

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Autumn Update

Rocket League Autumn update

Psyonix announced the details regarding their huge Autumn update.

The update, set to hit the pitch on Sept. 28, 2017, also marks the end of the fifth competitive season and the beginning of season six. As always, the end of a season means rank rewards. Psyonix previously announced that the season five rewards are banners players can use to customize their in-game name. The banners will appear around the player’s name when, for example, they score a goal.

Psyonix also announced a huge set of other additions and changes.

Farmstead

Autumn Update

Farmstead. Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

With the Autumn update, Psyonix is releasing a seasonal arena named Farmstead. The arena will be available in competitive, casual and private matches, but it won’t be around forever. The landscape around the arena features farmland, a barn, cardboard cow cutouts and trees with different colored leaves representing the season.

Farmstead will be a standard arena, so there’s no need to worry about learning new dimensions.

In Psyonix’s words, get ready to “disturb the tranquility of a rural farm during harvest time with rocket-powered competitions.”

New Maps

Along with Farmstead, Psyonix announced the addition of several other standard maps which will be added in the Autumn update. These maps include Champions Field (Day), Mannfield (Snowy), DFH Stadium (Day), Starbase Arc and Wasteland.

Perhaps the most interesting announcement regarding these new maps is the standardization of Starbase Arc and Wasteland. This isn’t the first time Psyonix has standardized a once non-standard map. The first non-standard map to be switched was Neo Tokyo.

Originally, Neo Tokyo had two platforms on either side of the pitch, creating a second elevated surface to drive on and play off of. After some time, however, and more than a few complaints from the community, Neo Tokyo was removed entirely and eventually brought back as standard map.

Some people do enjoy the non-standard maps. But, all I have to say on the matter is that Neo Tokyo was the best non-standard map and I’m happy to see Starbase Arc and Wasteland be standardized.

Other Additions

Banners and the new standard maps aren’t the only additions Psyonix announced for the update; There’s a whole bunch of other additions to get excited about.

Accelerator Crate and Decryptors

The next crate, which will begin dropping after the Autumn update is released, is named the Accelerator Crate. The crate, as always, gives players one item from a set list upon unlocking. Psyonix announced six of the possible items you can get from the Accelerator crate. These include:

Autumn Update

Accelerator Crate. Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

  • Pearlescent (Matte) – Rare paint finish
  • Hot Rocks – Very Rare trail
  • Power Shot – Import boost
  • Chrono – Exotic wheels
  • Popcorn – Black Market goal explosion
  • Jäger 619 RS – car body

While the Accelerator Crate is sure to contain other items as well, this is what Psyonix has announced ahead of time.

Another possible drop coming in the Autumn update are Decryptors. Represented by the image of a USB flash drive, Decryptors can unlock crates the way purchasable keys do. These Decryptors will only drop during events. However, players can’t trade the item, which seems to be the only downside to opening a crate with a Decryptor.

Events

Psyonix hasn’t announced what or when the first event will be. That being said, they did say keep an eye out “for more details when each in-game event drops after the Autumn update launches.”

Adding events gives players something new and exciting to look forward to on a regular basis.

Items

For all of you digital hoarders and pack rats, you’ve done well. Along with additions mentioned above, Psyonix announced that there are over 90 new, free items set to drop in the update.

The items, which include Uncommon, Rare and Very Rare toppers, antennas and boosts, can be acquired as drops after completion of a match or through trading in items for new items. Time to take all those pigeon-head toppers you’ve amassed (yes, I’m talking to you Pigeon Man) and trade them in for something new.

Director Mode (Beta) and LAN Support

Along with all of the items and maps rolling out with the Autumn update, Psyonix also announced Director Mode (Beta) and LAN Support.

Director Mode is a new camera option for spectating matches. While it’s only being released as a beta for now, the new camera mode promises to make spectating matches that much better. According to Psyonix, “this AI-powered camera cuts to the most relevant player’s viewpoint based on what’s happening in the match. It can even predict future shots and saves to find the best angles.”

Psyonix is taking spectating matches to the next level, if Director Mode works the way it’s intended.

As for the LAN Support, “starting with the Autumn update, PC players can experience local multiplayer games for parties and local tourneys,” bringing the competitive side of things to a local setting.

Reworks

Psyonix also announced reworks to two existing features in the game, the in-game blog and goalposts.

Autumn Update

Transparent goalposts. Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

As of now, the in-game blog features the most recent announcement regarding in-game news and esports news. The announcement of the Autumn update is the featured story right now. That being said, with the Autumn update, Psyonix will have the ability to showcase several news items on the in-game blog instead of a single story.

Last, but certainly not least, is my personal favorite announcement. Beginning with the Autumn update, goalposts will be transparent. This means no more guessing where the ball is on the wall while you’re sitting in net ready to make the save.

You can argue that that’s what the ball outline is for, but the outline often disappears right as the ball is above your goal or coming around the corner along the wall, which means the outline was disappearing at the most crucial times it needs to be there. Now, however, players won’t have to worry anymore as they should always be able to see the ball.

So, remember to hit the pitch September 28, and go drop Psyonix a ‘Nice One!’


You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Ryan McElroy.

Featured image courtesy of rocketleague.com

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season four

Season four begins

We’re just days away from season four of the Rocket League Championship Series (RLCS) and inaugural Rocket League Rival Series (RLRS). It’s finally time to take a look at this season’s competitors, with Play-Ins taking place last weekend.

season four

Image courtesy of steamcardexchange.net

Despite upsets already happening, Friday marks the beginning of a long road to the world finals for these players.

Season four will take place over the next six weeks, with Oceania’s league play offset from North America and Europe by a week. Meaning OCE’s fifth week of league play will take place on week six, while NA and EU are in regional championships. Two weeks after this, OCE’s regional championship will take place alongside NA and EU’s promotion/relegation tournament.

Teams

With the addition of the RLRS, there are 40 teams competing in season four. 16 from NA, 16 from EU and eight from OCE. Here’s a look at the season four teams, with substitute players in parenthesis.

NA

RLCS

  • Cloud9: Torment / SquishyMuffinz / Gimmick / (Napp)
  • Emotion: Allushin / Sea-bass / TyNotTyler / (Blaze)
  • Flyquest: CorruptedG / Chrome / Sadjunior / (Pepiope)
  • G2 Esports: Kronovi / Rizzo / Jknaps / (Turtle)
  • Ghost: Klassux / Lethamyr / Zanejackey / (blueze)
  • NRG: Fireburner / Jacob / GarretG / (DudeWithTheNose)
  • Renegades: Dappur / Moses / Timi / (Mijo)
  • Rogue: Matt / Sizz / Insolences / (Red)

 RLRS

  • Ambition Esports: PrimeThunder / Wonder / Air / (sQuillis)
  • Cypher: Dooble / Kerupt / King Wizard / (Akenro)
  • Fibeon: Chicago / Zolhay / Hato / (Raze)
  • Incognito: GoRocksGo / Tuster / JWismont / (Nickymac18)
  • Out of Style: Lachinio / JSTN / EPICJonny
  • Premature Superhero Cops: Gambit / Prem / Genocop / (Donnie)
  • SetToDestroyX: Lemonpuppy / Halcyon / Memory / (Loomin)
  • Wildcard Gaming: Laz / Nomad / Pepper / (Astroh)

EU

 RLCS

  • Aeriality: Continuum / Tylacto / FlamE / (Ertunc)
  • EnVyUs: Remkoe / Deevo / gReazymeister / (Mout)
  • exceL: Nielskoek / Pwndx / Zensuz / (Masterio)
  • Flipsid3 Tactics: Markydooda / Kuxir97 / Miztik / (JHZER)
  • frontline: Ferra / Bluey / Chausette45 / (Yukeo)
  • Gale Force eSports: ViolentPanda / Turbopolsa / Kaydop / (Dogu)
  • Method: al0t / Metsanauris / Mognus / (Sniper)
  • Mockit eSports: paschy90 / Fairy Peak! / FreaKii / (PetricK)

 RLRS

  • BoonkGang: Skyline / Mummisnow / EyeIgnite / (Tizz)
  • eHawkerz: Kontrol / GCR710 / dani_ana
  • Endpoint: Tinny / Cheerio / Shakahron / (Pulsar)
  • Inspiration: Oscillon / Sebadam / Lauty / (Flakes)
  • Soul Gaming: Dadooh / SkieS / ghostfire / (Wolfsonthemoon)
  • Supersonic Avengers: PauliepaulNL / ELMP / Shikuni / (kilEak)
  • The Juicy Kids: Killerno7 / stocki / Frag / (coKaaa)
  • The Leftovers: Snaski / Maestro / Sikii / (Danzhizzle)

OCE

  • Avant Gaming: Cyrix / Ellusive / Siki / (Requiem)
    season four

    Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

  • Chiefs ESC: Torsos / Drippay / Jake / (Enigma)
  • Conspiracy Esports: Hectic / Slurpee / Walcott
  • JAM Gaming: Montyconnor / Express / Shadey / (Bango)
  • Legacy Esports: Soma / Zen / Plitz
  • Noizee Isn’t Toxic: Noizee / Outlast / Zest / (Reggles)
  • Pale Horse Esports: CJCJ / Kamii / Kia
  • Scylla Esports: Dumbo / SnarfSnarf / Addzey

Ultimately, all of these teams are aiming for a chance to take the stage at the world championships. However, the road to the world championships is longer for some of these teams than others. Any team in the RLRS hoping to make it into the world championships will have to wait until season five.

Future seasons

In order for any of the teams in the RLRS to have a shot at the world championships in season five, they’ll have to come in the top two for their region in season four. Even then, they aren’t guaranteed a spot in the RLCS. At the end of season four, the top two teams in each region of the RLRS will take part in a double-elimination, best-of-seven tournament along with the bottom two teams in region of the RLCS. This tournament will determine whether a team drops into the lower RLRS division, rises up into the higher RLCS division, or simply stays in their current division.

The introduction of this promotion/relegation system raises the stakes for these players. They can no longer simply regroup or try a new team after a cold season and make into the RLCS next time around. Any new team hoping to compete in the RLCS must first fight their way to the top of the RLRS.

Upsets

season four

Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

Despite league play not beginning until Friday, season four has already seen several upsets. Many expected to see Fibeon Esports get a shot at the RLCS in season four. However, they were relegated to the RLRS after losing 3-0 to Emotion in the loser’s bracket of Play-Ins.

Perhaps the biggest upset so far, though, is the relegation of The Leftovers to the RLRS. After season three, The Leftovers gave Victor “Ferra” Francal the boot, opting to replace him with veteran Nicolai “Maestro” Bang. Ferra created his own team and knocked The Leftovers into the loser’s bracket with a clean sweep.

In the loser’s bracket, The Leftovers were relegated to the RLRS after losing by another clean sweep. This time to Aeriality. Aeriality was, perhaps, expected to make it into the RLRS. However, the clean sweep over the veterans in The Leftovers sent them into RLCS, causing perhaps the biggest upset of season four so far.

What next?

With teams relegated and league play about to begin, the real question is whether or not these upset teams can hold their own against the veteran teams they’ll be up against in the RLCS. Will the upsets continue, or will they find themselves being relegated down to the RLRS for season five?

Team captain of The Leftovers, Nicolai “Snaski” Vistesen Andersen believes his team will be promoted to the RLCS for season five, as he tweeted “Guess we gotta go through RLRS to show everyone that we definitely don’t belong there.” There’s a strong possibility that this veteran team will do just that, coming in the top two of the RLRS and winning their way into the RLCS during the promotion/relegation tournament. That being said, in order for The Leftovers to be promoted, someone has to be relegated down.

With these upset teams already shattering expectations, it’s surely possible they will continue to do so during league play. Hence the term upset. Yet, I fully expect to see Emotion from NA and Aeriality from EU at least competing in their respective promotion/relegation tournaments, if not being relegated down to the RLRS for season five.


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Collegiate Rocket League

Collegiate Rocket League: Season one

On Wednesday, Psyonix announced the first season of Collegiate Rocket League. Following the Collegiate Rocket League Summer Series, Psyonix is teaming up with Tespa again to bring the fall 2017 season. For those who don’t know, Tespa gaming organization is focused on collegiate play.

The Collegiate Rocket League Summer Series was Psyonix’s first break into collegiate esports. With five weekly tournaments, students who were registered for classes in the upcoming fall 2017 semester competed for their share of $2,500 in Steam and PlayStation Network funds.

While Steam and PlayStation Network funds are certainly an adequate incentive, Psyonix and Tespa returned with a season one prize pool sure to incentivize students further: $50,000 in scholarships and official Collegiate Rocket League merchandise.

Eligibility

Season one of Collegiate Rocket League is open to full-time students enrolled in the United States and Canada. The season is open to universities and community colleges alike.

Collegiate Rocket League

Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

Along with being a full-time student, there are a few other requirements players must meet in order to remain eligible. These include:

  • maintaining a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.500
  • students must be legal residents or hold a valid visa for the country in which they attend school
  • players must be the legal adults or receive parental consent
  • teams must consist of three to five players, all attending the same school
  • players must be able to verify school enrollment

While all players of a team must attend the same school, there is no limit to how many teams can represent a single school.

Collegiate Rocket League is open to PC and PlayStation 4 players.

Format

Collegiate Rocket League

Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

The season will consist of four separate conferences: northern, southern, eastern and western. Each conference consists of four teams.

Teams can sign up for one of two qualifiers in their respective conference. Qualifiers are double elimination, with the top four teams advancing to the Conference Group Stage.

The season also has an Open Ladder. Teams that don’t qualify for their Conference Group Stage still have a chance to make it into Conference Playoffs as a wild card by competing in the Open Ladder. Playoffs will determine which teams from each conference will compete head-to-head at the Collegiate Rocket League National Championship.

Registration for qualifiers opened Wednesday and will continue through Sept. 15, 2017. Qualifiers begin the following day.

Prize Pool

The $50,000 scholarship prize pool will be divided among the top eight teams at the Collegiate Rocket League National Championship. Breakdown of the prize pool, per player, is as follows:

  • Fifth through eighth: $1,200
  • Fourth: $1,700
  • Third: $2,200
  • Second: $3,000
  • Champions: $5,000

Why it matters

Collegiate esports, as with esports in general, continue to grow in popularity. Tespa alone hosts several other popular collegiate esports leagues such as Heroes of the Dorm (Heroes of the Storm) and the Tespa Collegiate Series (Overwatch).

Format

In terms of format, it’s great to see Psyonix and Tespa turning Collegiate Rocket League into a full on season as opposed to a one-off tournament.

This format sets the stage for deeper competitive play. Losing a match doesn’t mean the end for a team, as reaching playoffs depends on a teams performance throughout the entire season. Not only that, but the season, playoff and national championship format set Rocket League up for future success in a collegiate environment.

Eligibility and prize pool

As Psyonix and Tespa look to put Rocket League on the collegiate map, there are several important factors to commend

Collegiate Rocket League

Image courtesy of rocketleague.com

them for in regards to eligibility and prize pool.

One important factor is the prize pool. Offering scholarship money, instead of cash, encourages students to continue their studies while still allowing them to experience what it’s like to compete in esports. A cash prize may have the potential to pull students away from their studies in order to focus on the game.

Secondly, the minimum cumulative GPA also encourages players to remain focused on their schoolwork. A 2.500 cumulative GPA is equivalent to the 80th percentile, or a B grade average. So, if players hope to continue competing, they need to keep their grades up.

This system treats collegiate esports similarly to traditional sports in a college setting. Education is expected to be the player or athlete’s number one priority, with the opportunity to compete considered a privilege. At the same time, the system still offers players incentives for competing.

It’s also important to note that matches will take place on weekends. However, this is common even for major professional esports tournaments.

So, if you’re hoping to bring home the Collegiate Rocket League championship title to your school, keep practicing and keep your grades up.


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language ban

Psyonix to implement new ‘Language Ban’ system

Psyonix announced Wednesday they are working to tweak Rocket League’s report-ban system. They are focusing on a new automatic language ban system.

As it is, players can mute and report teammates and opponents mid-game. When reporting someone, players have three options as to why they are reporting the other player. These options include “verbal/text harassment,” “unsportsmanlike conduct” and “cheating.”

According to Psyonix, the majority of thousands of daily reports “are tied to in-game abuse and harassment—typically in the form of abusive language.” They responded by introducing what they call the “Language Ban” system.

What it does

The automatic Language Ban system builds off the existing report-ban system in place. The basic idea of the system is to automatically ban players for using certain words and phrases.

Mute/Report player. Screenshot courtesy of Ryan McElroy

A new feature players may have already noticed with the report-ban system is a chat log that appears while reporting a player. The submission sends the chat log off alongside the report, allowing the automatic language ban system to determine whether to plan players for abusive language or not.

Already, there is a list of over 20 words and variations which the system scans chat logs for. Psyonix stated that the list “will continue to evolve over time, and include words and phrases from multiple languages.” The list of words will not be released to the public at this time.

How it works

According to the announcement, the words and phrases included in the ban list each have their own use limit. Players are automatically subject to ban once the limit is reached.

The system punishes repeat offenders with progressively longer bans. Initially, the system gives the player a 24 hour ban. The time then increases to 72 hours, followed by one week and, eventually, a permanent ban.

Abuse and Season Rewards

Psyonix also included an update on season rewards and rank abuse in the announcement.

language ban

Report player options. Screenshot courtesy of Ryan McElroy

At the end of competitive season three, and now season four, Psyonix denied players end-of-season rewards.

“When the reward trails were issued last month, players who were found abusing the matchmaking system to increase their rank, were not rewarded for their actions,” Psyonix said.

The announcement cited “gaming the system to force a win or a loss” as an example of how players abuse the ranking system. Psyonix acknowledged the potential room for error. The announcement offered the option to appeal a denial of rewards by contacting the Rocket League support team.

What it all means

There is some good and bad with the language ban system and denial of season rewards. That being said, the good easily outweighs the bad.

With 34 million players of all ages from around the globe, Psyonix is aiming to keep Rocket League a welcoming and friendly community to all.

Language Ban

Anyone who plays Rocket League, or competitive esport games in general for that matter, knows that tilting happens.

You’ve had a bad day in general and now you’re on a losing streak, your teammate whiffs and the next thing you know you’re furiously typing about how he or she should uninstall the game immediately.

However, isolated instances shouldn’t result in a ban for the player. The ban focuses on continuous verbal/text harassment. As well, Psyonix listed racial slurs as an example for the type of language that will get a player banned. Since there’s no justification for throwing around racial slurs, the average player should won’t have to worry about this, tilted or not.

Season reward denials

As for continuing to deny end-of-season rewards, Psyonix is making a solid choice.

There is always the chance that the system will deny innocent players their rightful rewards. However, Psyonix recognizes this and offers the chance to appeal denials.

language ban

Image courtesy of store.playstation.com

As for truly guilty parties, they deserve to be denied their rewards. Millions of players seek to improve their mechanical and decision making skills every day. The only goal in mind to progress through the ranks and see their game getting better in the process. They look for true competition against others of a comparable caliber. Matching with a smurf account or someone trying to game the system takes away the joy of competition. At the same time, it discourages honest players and may eventually deter them from returning to the competitive portion of the game.

In conclusion, keep it classy and friendly folks. Tilting happens to the best of us, but there is no need to continuously harass other players, whether verbally or through text. We’re all here for high-flying car-soccer action.


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