2017 NFL Draft Profile: Nick Holshoe

Former Concordia safety and current NFL draft prospect Nick Holshoe loves football and loves to hit. It is something NFL scouts have taken note on.

Holshoe was working out at the College Gridiron Showcase in Texas when he was approached by a scout from the San Francisco 49ers who asked him two questions.

“The first thing he asked me was if I love football,” Holshoe said. “I said yes sir. And he asked if I love to hit. I told him yeah I love to. He said those are two notes I have on you after watching you practice today.”

Nick Holshoe

Photo Courtesy of Mlive.com

Holshoe said his biggest attribute is passion for the game. It is something he has enjoyed watching at the professional level growing up in players like John Lynch, Ray Lewis and Brian Dawkins. Holshoe said he admired their blue-collar work ethic they brought to the field.

“That’s what I think I bring to the table,” Holshoe said. “They just had so much passion for the game. I loved people that liked to hit and that is one of my favorite things to do.”

Holshoe finished his career at Concordia with 381 career tackles, which ranks second in school history. He also is the school’s all-time leader in interceptions with 14. In his senior year he finished with 88 tackles, two interceptions and two forced fumbles. Holshoe also finished 11th in the country in punt return yards.

Holshoe said along with being a hard hitter, he would also consider himself a ball hawk. He said it comes from when he used to play offense.

“I just love having the ball in my hand and making plays. I like to come down with the ball rather than the receiver.”

Holshoe has been working out with Concordia head strength coach David Lawrence, who is also the head strength and conditioning coach at Michigan Elite Conditioning for Athletes. Lawrence is considered one of the top strength and conditioning coaches in the world and has worked with guys like former NFL No. 1 pick Eric Fisher, Frank Zombo and Brandon Pettigrew.

Holshoe hopes he won’t be walking the stage at graduation because it means he will be at rookie camp. The exercise science major hopes to take his football career as far as possible and then plans to open a gym in Tampa Bay, Florida. Holshoe believes his work ethic and love for football are some of the biggest traits he can offer an NFL team.

“My biggest attributes would be passion for the game and my relentless pursuit to perfection,” Holshoe said. “I can offer 100 percent commitment and my total hustle and pursuit to the ball.”

Nick Holshoe Scouting Report

Nick Holshoe has adequate size at 5’11” and 198 pounds. He has a lot of experience at Concordia racking up 381 tackles and 14 interceptions.

From the snap, Holshoe diagnoses the play well and then does his assignment. In running plays he runs downhill towards the ball carrier and makes a sure tackle. In passing plays he tracks his man if he is in man coverage or starts reading the quarterback’s eyes if he is in zone coverage.

He is great at zone coverage because he reads the quarterback’s eyes so well. He plays the deep zone most of the time and uses his good speed to cover a big portion of the field.

Holshoe has good experience playing special teams in college, which should help him out with his quest to make an NFL roster. His speed and tackling ability make him a perfect fit for punt and kick coverage. With his ability he should be able to make it on the field as a special team player early in his career.

In order to make it on the field as a safety, Holshoe will have to prove that he can cover NFL level receivers in man to man coverage and track them down if he is in zone.

 

 

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New England Patriots 2017 NFL Draft Profile

By: Jonathan Reiter

Happy 32nd Day of Draftmas! To conclude our NFL Draft breakdown, we turn to the defending Super Bowl Champions.

Summary

The New England Patriots finished the season with a league best 14-2 record. Even with Tom Brady being suspended for the first four games of the season, the Patriots did not falter. The Patriots’ stellar season culminated with the raising of the Lombardi trophy after a 25-point comeback to defeat the Atlanta Falcons 34-28.

Tom Brady (Photo courtesy: abcnews.com)

The Patriots are setting their sights on another title run this upcoming season, but there have been a few key departures which threaten the chances of defending their crown. On the defensive side of the ball, the Patriots saw Jabaal Sheard leave for the Colts and Chris Long went to the Eagles. Their defensive line is not getting any younger either with Rob Ninkovich entering his 13th season.

LeGarrette Blount still finds himself without a team. Patriots are still considering the possibility of bringing Blount back, but it would have to be at a discount rate with James White, Dion Lewis and Rex Burkhead already formulated into Brady’s offense.

The Patriots also may be looking into the possibility of an addition to the secondary. The Patriots resigned Super Bowl 49 hero Malcom Butler after he shopped around his services as a restricted free agent. Malcom Butler is still at the center of trade rumors, and he could be Bill Belichick’s ace-in-the-hole to trade into the first round.

New England also recruited some new faces to their title defense. Most notably, the Patriots traded for Brandon Cooks this offseason to add speed to Tom Brady’s spread offense. Rob Gronkowski found a new partner in crime in the veteran tight end Dwayne Allen. Martellus Bennett took on the work load at the tight end position after Gronkowski’s injury, but he will find himself playing at Lambeau Field with the Green Bay Packers next season.

Luckily for the Patriots they were able to re-sign Dont’a Hightower to lead the linebacker core for the defense. New England was also able to trade for Carolina’s DE Kony Ealy to help with the pass rush burden.

The Patriots fulfilled many of their key needs in offseason trades and free agency signings, but the kings of the NFL could use this 2017 NFL draft to solidify their spot as the Super Bowl 52 champions in 2018.

THE DRAFT:

New England’s draft plan will have to wait until the third round this year unless they trade up into the first two rounds.  Most teams’ plans would be hindered by such a late start in the draft, but the Patriots’ ability to find great, late round talent is unparalleled.  The Patriots find themselves with less picks due to trades and sanctions of the “ridiculous” Deflategate.

PICKS:

Third Round: 72nd and 96th Picks

Fourth Round: 131st Pick

Fifth Round: 163rd and 183rd Picks

Sixth Round: 200th

Seventh Round: 237th Pick

NEEDS:

Defensive End

The top priority for the Patriots is to solidify the defensive line. The Patriots will most likely find a player who works opposite of Kony Ealy at the defensive end position. New England’s rush defense was tied for 3rd best in the league last season, and an addition to the defensive line is key to keeping a top tier defense intact.

Cornerback

The Patriots also need to focus on a secondary option with the question surrounding Malcom Butler. A young cornerback is never a bad idea for a team with the youth needed at the position today. Even with the possibility of Butler staying on the roster, developing a rookie cornerback this year would be a great investment into the future of the defense.

Tight End

Rob Gronkowski has a new counterpart in Dwayne Allen, but both tight ends have been prone to injury. Tight end by committee could be an option for this upcoming season if the Patriots take a tight end with a mid-round.

Offensive Line

The Patriots do not have many needs on the offensive side of the ball with the trades and free agency signings, but they should invest for the future with a pick on the o-line. New England’s blind side tackle is in the last year of his contract, and the Patriots do not have anyone to fill his role after the 2017 season. The Patriots need to find someone in the draft to be groomed for the 2018 system. They need to find a reliable player in this draft to take over the role because protecting Tom Brady’s blindside may be the most important job in the NFL.

 

THIRD ROUND BREAK DOWN

72nd Pick: Trey Hendrickson, DE, Florida Atlantic

Hendrickson comes from a small school, but he turned heads at the NFL combine. He had 51 tackles last season with 13.5 of them being sacks.

96th Pick: Sidney Jones, CB, Washington

Sidney Jones (Photo courtesy: cbssports.com)

Jones, who was considered the top corner in the draft, tore his Achilles during his pro day with NFL scouts watching. Jones’ ability to be ready for this upcoming season is unlikely, but he could be the investment into the secondary the Patriots need for the future.

Conclusion

The Patriots are not in the ideal drafting scenario for 2017, but they will still be a top team for the upcoming season. If they can find the right players in the mid to late rounds of the draft to solidify the defense, the New England Patriots will be on pace for a second straight Super Bowl victory.

You can read all of the previous days of Draftmas here!

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2017 NFL Draft Profile: Dakota Cox

Dakota Cox definitely made his mark at New Mexico over the last four years.

The former Lobos linebacker started 43 of the 46 games he played in. He finished his career with 403 tackles, which ranks sixth in school history and third in the Mountain West.

Cox also was able to help rebuild the Lobos’ football program. The team finished with a 4-9 record the year before he got there.

“Coming here in 2013, the team wasn’t really where it needed to be,” Cox said. “Coming in, I knew I could help get it to the level where it should be and kind of put the Lobos back on the map.”

By the end of his career, he was able to help the Lobos to back-to-back winning seasons in 2015 and 2016. The team also played in the Gildan New Mexico Bowl in both of those winning seasons, losing the first year and winning the second. Cox said playing with his New Mexico teammates was an awesome experience.

“I’ve made plenty of awesome friendships, just really kind of a brotherhood around here,” Cox said. “Guys I know are going to be friends for life.”

Photo Courtesy of footballmatters.org

Before 2015, the last time the Lobos finished with a winning season was 1997 when another stud linebacker, Brian Urlacher, was on the team. Urlacher was one of the guys Cox admired growing up.

“Brian Urlacher was one of the first I watched play,” Cox said. “He was a guy I watched growing up pretty heavily because I wanted to be a linebacker just like him.”

Urlacher and Cox were definitely standouts in college. One thing that does separate them is size. Urlacher stands 6-foot-4, 258 pounds while Cox stands 6-foot and 229 pounds. Cox is considered undersized for a linebacker, but he said his film proves his size should not be a concern.

“If you watch my film, I’m a guy that plays hard all the time,” Cox said. “I bring 100 percent effort everytime I’m on the field and try to bring that intensity. I do think I play much bigger than I actually am. That is kind of what I take pride in.”

Cox has not talked to any teams personally, but a few have contacted his coaching staff to see how he has progressed. Cox has been training at New Mexico with the strength coaches and had a great pro day. He ran a 4.62 40-yard dash and put up 20 reps on the bench press. Since then he has been doing more football specific workouts to get bigger, faster and stronger for the NFL.

Cox believes one of the biggest things he can provide an NFL team is his experience.

“I bring a different aspect to the linebacker position,” Cox said. “Just being knowledgable of the game. I definitely have a good football I.Q., which I take pride in.”

Cox believes his film and stats speak for themselves and that no team would regret giving him a chance.

“If I can get the opportunity to play on a team I definitely think that no one would regret signing me,” Cox said. “I definitely think I can be a great contribution to any team.”

DAKOTA COX SCOUTING REPORT

Dakota Cox has adequate size standing just under six feet tall and weighing 226 pounds, but plays bigger than that. Cox is one of the most experienced linebackers in the draft class, leading the New Mexico Lobos in tackles for all four of his seasons. He displays his good football IQ on the field every game.

When the ball is snapped, Cox recognizes plays well and has a quick first step. He has adequate speed for a linebacker and ran a 4.62 40 yard dash at his pro day.  He is good at shedding or dodging blockers and get to the ball carrier on running plays. Once he reaches the ball carrier, he tackles well and almost always makes the play, if he can reach it.

He is good at zone coverage and has a lot of experience playing zone at New Mexico. For him to be a good NFL linebacker, he will have to prove he can cover better in man to man coverage and stay on the field for all three downs.

Cox’s best asset is tackling and nose for the ball. He seemingly always comes up with tackles and stops big plays before they happen.

For Cox to make it at the next level he will have to use his great tackling abilities on special teams. With his skill of dodging and shedding blockers, he can use that on the punt and kick coverage teams and eventually earn more playing time at linebacker. He is a player that could make the Pro Bowl as a special teamer.

Watch Dakota Cox’s career highlights here.

You can listen to Josh Burris interview Dakota Cox in its entirety below.

Josh Burris contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report.

You can “Like” The Game Haus on Facebook and “Follow” us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles written by other great TGH writers along with Josh and Joe!

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Branden Jackson’s Winding Journey to the NFL

Branden Jackson may be a defensive end for the Oakland Raiders now, but only because he wanted a free car in high school.

Well, maybe the free car his mom promised him is only part of why he’s now earning a living playing professional football, but it’s funny how things work sometimes.

It’s safe to say teenage Branden Jackson didn’t see himself being an NFL player down the road.

“In high school, it never crossed my mind,” Jackson said in an interview with The Game Haus. “I just wanted to get a free car.”

Jackson was promised a free car if he made it to college and got a free ride while doing it. That was the conception of Jackson’s motivation to being a football player.

In his family, football wasn’t the token sport. His family was known for being more successful on the basketball front.

College Teams Come Calling

When college programs began showing more interest in Jackson for his decorated young football career than his basketball talents, he figured it might be time to shift his time from the hardwood to the gridiron.

When offers from Texas Tech, Michigan State and 14 other Division I offers came in, Jackson knew playing big time college football was within his reach. However, an NFL career didn’t cross the four-star recruit’s mind.

Branden Jackson NFL

Branden Jackson was a standout for Texas Tech. (Photo: Mark Rogers/AJ Media)

Jackson committed to Texas Tech as a defensive hybrid with experience on the defensive line and at linebacker. Jackson also saw time at tight end in high school.

In Jackson’s redshirt-sophomore season, he had a breakout game on one of his biggest stages. Jackson said the game, the Holiday Bowl against Arizona State, was a springboard for the rest of his career.

“I had a good season and it was probably like my breakout game” Jackson said. “It was kinda what turned heads and jumpstarted the rest of my career.”

Jackson didn’t just put his name on the map for NFL scouts in the game. He also made his case to turn into the team’s best deep-threat.

Arizona State called a read option, and the exchange was fumbled. After making an attempt for the ball and missing, Jackson found himself way behind.

“I retrace and end up catching him about 20 or 30 yards down the field,” Jackson said. “I had ran past our starting safety and our starting corner. I tackled him and it kinda just showed how fast I am.”

Jackson didn’t let his impressive acceleration go unnoticed. The defensive hybrid pleaded with his coaches to give him some time on offense after the game.

“I kept telling my coach red zone is my game,” Jackson said. “I did it in high school. Put me in at tight end or receiver and in the red zone I guarantee a jump ball. You can throw it underhand if you want to, and I’ll go get it.”

That game caused Jackson to fall in love with the sport. He said that was when his visions of playing at the highest level first came.

Branden Jackson’s Draft Experience

Jackson’s dreams had to be put on hold after he was left untouched in the 2016 NFL Draft. Jackson was expecting to be taken around the sixth round.

Branden Jackson NFL

Branden Jackson was promoted to the active roster late in the season.(Photo: Mark J. Rebilas, USA TODAY Sports)

“When it didn’t come, I thought everyone doesn’t get drafted, that’s not my goal,” Jackson said. “I thought I would get a guaranteed priority free agent deal.”

Jackson received calls from multiple teams asking him to try out. He turned down five or six teams before reluctantly accepting gigs from Seattle and Oakland.

Although he was cut from the active roster during the preseason, Oakland struck a deal with the former Red Raider to join the practice squad.

Jackson remained on the practice squad for most of the season. Being on the opposite side of the country from his mother became emotionally taxing. The practice squad player continued to plug away with the Raiders and decided to fly his mother out to Oakland late in the year.

During that same week, Jackson got promoted to the 53-man active roster.

Branden Jackson on the Raiders’ Season

Oakland took the NFL by storm last season. A perennially underwhelming franchise since 2002, the Raiders found the NFL Playoffs for the first time in 14 seasons.

The team had an elite quarterback, suitable offensive weapons, a good line and a solid defense across the board. Oakland finished 12-4, but lost Derek Carr for the rest of the season due to a broken leg in week 16.

Carr had dislocated his thumb earlier in the year, giving all of Raider Nation a scare. Carr sprinted into the locker room, got his thumb back to “normal” and entered the game quickly. Jackson and his teammates expected Carr’s leg injury to be small like that.

Jackson said he expected an inspiring speech in the locker room after the game from Carr. Instead, the team learned Carr’s fate.

Oakland entered the playoffs with a backup quarterback who was far from Carr’s caliber.

The Raiders lost an underwhelming game to the Houston Texans, a team that was known by many as the worst team in the playoffs.

Even so, Jackson considered the season to be a success, saying they won more games than most teams in the NFL.

The Move to Las Vegas

Branden Jackson

The Raiders’ proposed new stadium should bring many faces to Vegas.(Photo: Manica Architecture)

The Oakland Raiders franchise announced it would move to Las Vegas on March 27. Although Raiders fans in and around Oakland were baffled and enraged, Jackson doesn’t think the move is a big deal.

“I really didn’t put too much thought into it because Raider Nation is Raider Nation,” Jackson said. “When we go to Vegas, the fans will still be crazy.”

Jackson pointed to the true loyalty of Raider fans multiple times during the interview. Even though he’s been with the club for one year, he’s already felt the love Raider Nation has for its people. That said, he expects fans to continue to be tenacious with their support.

“It would be un-Raider like for our fans to not be the way they’ve always been,” Jackson said.

So, what’s with jackson’s car situation?

Because Jackson earned a free ride to Texas Tech, his mother followed through on her promise. Jackson received a Caprice Classic for about $1,500. He loved the car until death did them part.

“I drove it literally until it blew up,” Jackson said.

When Jackson became a starter at Texas Tech, his father gifted him a 1972 Lincoln Continental. Jackson continues to drive that car to this day.

Of course, Jackson’s love for the game has replaced his desire for material gifts to continue playing football. However, The Game Haus will keep you updated on any changes with his car driving status.

Oh, and we’ll update you on his football playing days as well.

Branden Jackson Scouting Report

Branden Jackson has good size at 6-foot-4, 268 pounds. He played as a 3-4 defensive end at Texas Tech, but now plays as a 4-3 defensive end for the Oakland Raiders. His versatility is a major asset.

He has good strength that he uses to shed blockers and get to ball carriers. For a defensive end, which is a position mostly reserved for good pass rushers, he is good against the run. His good gap discipline helps him be effective against the run and he can even take on double teams from opposing blockers.

His strength is his main asset when rushing the passer too, as he fends off blockers. Against scrambling quarterbacks, he is good at containing them in the pocket.

 

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

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2017 NFL Draft Profile: Terrish Webb

Terrish Webb is one of the most experienced players that look to hear their name called in this year’s NFL Draft. The free safety from Pitt played in 45 games in his college career, including all 13 games the Panthers played in his freshman season.

Four years ago, many expected Webb to have success in college on the other side of the ball. Webb played both wide receiver and defensive back in high school, and was listed as a three-star wide receiver in the class of 2013 in 247 Sports’ recruiting database.

One of Webb’s coaches at Pitt suggested the switch to safety, and it’s paid off for Webb.

“It was kind of a switch up, being an offensive type of guy,” Webb said. “Once I got down to the basics I just ran with it.”

Terrish Webb

Photo: CardiacHill.com

While talking about Webb in high school, it’s impossible not to mention his team’s unprecedented success.

Webb was instrumental in helping Clairton High School win 63 straight games, and Webb’s season never ended with a loss. That’s right, Clairton High School won a state championship in all four of Webb’s seasons.

Webb also played in a state championship game with his basketball team in his senior year.

As an all-state athlete, it seems as though his high school career foreshadowed what was to come. All that winning didn’t end when Webb arrived on Pitt’s campus.

Webb and the Panthers handed national champion Clemson its only loss of the season. Pitt upset Clemson, 43-42, and Webb had nine tackles.

As Webb makes his next step, hoping to land on an NFL roster, he knows there’s still work to be done as he prepares for his Pro Day.

“Becoming a little stronger because I’m moving to the next level, so guys are bigger, faster, stronger,” Webb said. “Working on my technique and trying to take less steps as I’m breaking.”

Webb’s strongest suit is his ability to help a team in multiple ways. Webb was asked to do a lot at Pitt, and he answered the bell with vigor.

If an NFL scout walked through Webb’s door tomorrow, Webb is confident that he’d be able to sell himself.

“I would tell him that you’re getting a very smart football player,” Webb said. “I would be able to play special teams and I’m versatile as a defensive back. I can play pretty much anywhere as a defensive back.”

Webb may not be the Malik Hooker of the 2017 NFL Draft class, but he brings a winning charisma and the talent and smarts to contribute in many different facets.

Terrish Webb Scouting Report

Terrish Webb (Photo courtesy: twitter.com)

Webb’s size is adequate (5-foot-11-inches, 195 pounds) for the NFL level and shouldn’t hold him back whatsoever. NFL teams will love the fact that he was in on a lot of snaps for Pitt.

Webb diagnoses plays and route concepts very well. He also trusts his eyes. When he sees something he recognizes, he goes to make a play. Webb has good discipline and isn’t fooled by trick plays or play action passes.

The best trait for Webb is that he doesn’t give up any big plays on deep throws down the middle of his field or on running plays. He won’t let receivers behind him down the middle of the field. On running plays, he gets in good position and makes the play.

He isn’t the hardest hitter, but Webb is a sure tackler who can also break up passing plays by hitting the receivers as soon as they touch the football.

In order for Webb to be successful in the NFL, he will have to cover well one on one and provide good run support. He will likely need to be able to do well on special teams in order to get playing time at the NFL level.

 

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Terrish Webb in its entirety below.

 

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Jordan Bowman

The College Gridiron Showcase shows off the top college football players from across the NCAA in a five-day camp. The camp is selective and prestigious, and gives under the radar prospects a chance to shine for over 100 professional scouts to see. Former California of Pennsylvania University star Jordan Bowman was one of the players invited to the showcase, and Bowman had a chance to talk with NFL scouts about his game.

The feedback he got was both positive and constructive.

“I need to work on my hip mobility,” Bowman said. “Some people think I have tight hips and I can’t flip them as fluently as I should be able to. I also got feedback that I’m a smart football player with pretty good instincts and ball skills.”

Bowman was an All-American for one of Division II’s finest football programs. Bowman piled multiple awards over his four years with the team, including multiple all-region and all-conference awards.

The strong safety is one of the best all-around players that you’ve probably never heard of. Bowman has size, speed, intangibles and a great personality, all of which can makeup a future NFL performer.

Jordan Bowman

Photo: Mon Valley Independent

The fact that Bowman comes from what could be called the Ohio State of Division II in terms of NFL production helps his cause. With several former Cal players in the NFL right now, Bowman thinks scouts need to give high consideration to players coming out of the program.

“I definitely think they should because we have six guys in the league right now,” Bowman said. “We were also very good this year and have a lot of big names in our class. I feel as though a lot of scouts are definitely gonna be on the lookout for us and Cal teams to come.”

Cal has bred Bowman into a solid football player, and the strong safety puts in plenty of work off the field to become the player he is.

“I take pride in my football IQ and my preparation,” Bowman said. “Watching film, hours of it each week, looking at QB tendencies, favorite route concepts, receiver giveaways and being all over the field.”

Bowman’s talent isn’t just in his head. Bowman scored a touchdown in all four seasons at Cal and totaled 170 career tackles.

“I bring consistency, I bring leadership, I bring all traits of a safety,” Bowman said. “I can tackle, I can run, I can cover, and I stay out of trouble.”

Bowman, although gifted, will see a huge talent disparity as he transitions from playing Division II college football to playing with the greatest football players on the planet in the NFL. Bowman is solid in the box, playing man and dropping back in coverage, but doing those things in the NFL is no easy task.

The NFL prospect understands how different the NFL is. Athletes that play in the league are physically gifted like no one else.

“I think the biggest thing is gonna be the size and speed,” Bowman said. “Playing against Julio Jones who is 6-4, 220 and runs a sub 4-40, those guys are freaks that you don’t normally see.”

Even with a bright future playing football, any athlete’s playing days are numbered. Luckily for Bowman, he’s smart in areas that aren’t just football.

Bowman majored in business administration at Cal. The major is broad and many aren’t sure what to do with a business degree.

Bowman isn’t one of those people. Just like Bowman stands out on the football field, he wants to stand out in business.

“I want to be an entrepreneur and create my own path,” Bowman said. “I don’t wanna just be a guy in a company, come to work 9-5 every day. I’d rather open my own shop or franchise.”

Jordan Bowman was one of the best players in one of the best programs in college football during his time at Cal. Bowman has the potential and tools to bring that success to the NFL.

His playing days are numbered, just like anyone else’s. However, luckily for Bowman, he has a plan, whether he’s on the field or off.

Jordan Bowman Scouting Report

His height and weight (6 feet, 208 pounds) are good enough for the NFL level and he has great football IQ, demonstrating his attention to detail in the film room. He is able to be positioned near the line of scrimmage like Troy Polamalu, or cover deep.

Jordan Bowman (Photo courtesy: nfldraftonline.com)

Once the ball is snapped, Bowman starts reading the quarterback’s eyes and diagnosing the play, both of which he does well. When the ball is thrown he jumps the route and makes plays. He is solid at both man to man and zone coverage. Bowman displays the ability to be in the right place at the right time, something that is key for safeties.

He is capable in run support and demonstrates his tackling ability. Bowman isn’t used as a blitzer often, but when he is, he takes down the ball carrier or quarterback often.

Some concerns with Bowman will be his speed and his ability to cover NFL-level talent.

Teams will love Bowman’s ability to play special teams and that is how he will be able to make an immediate impact on an NFL team. He will be fighting to make an NFL roster so excelling at special teams needs to be his competitive advantage over other players vying to make the team.

You can view Jordan Bowman’s highlights here.

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Jordan Bowman in its entirety below.

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Aaron Terry

Football players are just dumb jocks, or so they say. However, that’s not the case for two-time All-American Aaron Terry.

Terry played for Division II powerhouse California University of Pennsylvania and garnered multiple impressive national and regional awards. All the while, Terry found his way onto the dean’s list multiple times and will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice in May.

If that’s not remarkable enough, Terry intends to pursue a master’s in business as he pursues an NFL career. Later on, Terry sees himself working for Homeland Security.

Terry was an electric punt returner and ball-hawking defensive back, and he expects to bring those traits with him to the NFL.

The 5-foot-11-inch standout can play anywhere in the defensive backfield, and his versatility gives him a shot at making an NFL roster.

“I’m able to play more than one position on the field,” Terry said. “I’m very good at special teams as well. You’re able to do more things with me.”

Aaron Terry

Photo: California University of Pennsylvania Athletics

His encounters at Cal are some that he values emphatically.

“My experience has just been one of a kind,” Terry said. “It’s definitely not something that I would trade in for any other school.”

“In high school, I never won a championship and then I get to Cal and I win a championship and I’m on the winning team. It was a great atmosphere. I love the team and I would never trade it in.”

Terry may want to thank his parents for his athletic ability. His mother was an all-state pitcher in high school and his father was a “very well-known” basketball player in Virginia.

While on the field, Terry amassed 13 interceptions and 175 total tackles. The three-time all-conference player also added one punt return for a touchdown in his career.

Terry averaged 13.2 yards per return as a punt returner and he credits his high football IQ to his success.

“The most important thing about punt return is being smart back there and not being scared,” Terry said. “I’m very smart and I understand what decisions to make and what not to make.”

Terry is working on every little thing to gain an edge. He is training in Pittsburgh while finishing his degree at Cal. Terry does weight training and combine drills and is never content with his talent level.

“You’re never as good as you want to be and I’m never satisfied,” Terry said. “I’m just making sure I perfect my craft. There’s always more room for improvement and I’m really a strong believer in that.”

Terry credits his eyes and instincts to his incredible play in zone coverage. Those smarts are helping him become a darkhorse candidate to become a great player at the next level.

Those same smarts will propel Terry to a successful career. Whether it be in football or criminal justice, Aaron Terry has the work ethic and intelligence to make a splash in whatever he does.

Aaron Terry Scouting Report

Terry has adequate size for an NFL defensive back at a touch under 6 feet and 200 pounds. He is usually in good position pre-snap, but sometimes gives a lot of cushion to receivers. That is something that can be fixed easily for the next level.

Aaron Terry

Aaron Terry (Photo courtesy: lockerroomupdate.com)

He is above average in man-to-man coverage, but is a great zone defender. The main quality that makes his zone coverage great is his ability to recognize where the receivers are and where they will be. He gets himself in the right position to make the play.

On broken plays, Terry shows good discipline by staying with his man or shutting down his zone. This gives the pass rushers more time to make a play.

As with many players at the Division II level, Terry will be questioned on whether he can cover NFL-level talent if asked to play man-to-man.

Like his teammate, Jordan Bowman, Terry offers the ability to play special teams and is a good punt returner. He has good hands and uses his excellent vision to find holes in the return game and breaks big plays. He has a career punt return average of 13.2 yards per return.

You can view Aaron Terry’s Highlights here.

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Aaron Terry in its entirety below.

 

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!

2017 NFL Draft Profile: Tyler Peerson

Tyler Peerson never missed a game in his time with California University of Pennsylvania. Tyler Peerson also started every single game with Cal, which is one of Division II football’s most accomplished programs.

That’s 44 games started, in 44 possible games. Tyler Peerson is durable. Tyler Peerson also was a first team All-American his senior season.

It’s safe to say Peerson is as consistent as they come. But playing a bunch of games played won’t impress NFL scouts. Scouts want to see talent. Luckily for Peerson has the talent.

“My hand placement is always on point,” Peerson said. “That’s something I’ve been able to acquire through wrestling in high school.”

Hand placement is one of the most important aspects of an offensive lineman’s repertoire. You’ve got to be able to move large men around and displace their movements.

“Not only the hand placement, but finishing blocks, blocking to the whistle,” Peerson said. “Just really opening up those holes for the backs or giving the quarterback the most time.”

Cal has sent multiple players to the NFL, which is already impressive for a Division II program. What’s more, C.J. Goodwin, who played in Super Bowl LI for the Atlanta Falcons, graduated from Cal.

Tyler Peerson (Photo courtesy: nfldraftdiamonds.com)

Peerson’s teammates, Jordan Bowman and Aaron Terry, are also in line to make an NFL squad.

It’s safe to say Peerson has a pedigree of talent and winning flowing through his veins after four years at Cal.

“Cal of PA has been great for me,” Peerson said. “This past season has been awesome because for the most part we were just blowing teams out which was a lot of fun.”

Other than Cal’s three-point win over IUP, the closest regular season game was a 35-14 beatdown of Gannon (PA). Cal scored 48 points or more in seven of its ten regular season games, thanks in no small part to Peerson.

The team averaged 49.6 points per game, good for first in the entire NCAA Division II.

Although there weren’t too many close calls in Peerson’s career, he relished the opportunity to play in tight games.

“The ones I always enjoy are the ones that are nail biters and they just come down to the wire,” Peerson said. “Those are the ones I enjoy the most, win or lose.”

As Peerson trains for his Pro Day, he’s working to becoming a more well-rounded, versatile player. He said he wants to be able to serve a team anywhere on the line and improve any team he’s on.

With solid size and mobility, Peerson has a great shot to help serve an NFL team. His durability is unmatched, and he’s been a one-of-a-kind player during his time at Cal.

Tyler Peerson Scouting Report

Peerson has good size for a guard at 6’4″ and 305 pounds. He has the versatility to play a lot of positions on the offensive line which will be his main selling point to NFL teams.

Run blocking is what Peerson is best at. He can block his man one on one and get downfield. After blocking his man he can get to the second level to pick up more blocks. He uses his mobility to pull effectively and picks up his block on the outside. Peerson is also good at getting downfield to block on screens.

His pass blocking isn’t as good as his run blocking, but he recognizes blitzes and picks them up. He has the necessary mobility to slide over and block pass rushers who are about to sack the quarterback.

Scouts will need to see that he can block players that have elite strength and speed, but Peerson has the fundamentals down.

You can view Tyler Peerson’s Highlights here.

You can listen to Tim Miller interview Tyler Peerson in its entirety below.

Tim Miller contributed the story portion of this article. Joe DiTullio provided the scouting report. 

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Tim and Joe!

What SF5, Season 2 Taught us About Capcom

Seasons in competitive gaming are becoming more and more commonplace, from games like League of Legends to Killer Instinct it would seem that companies are more and more dedicated to a ‘Season’ update pattern. Luckily for us gamers, Season allow us to easily see the direction that a game is going and analyze the development philosophy of the team behind it, for example:

 

Capcom has taken a page from Riot Games’ Book

 

This may as well be gone now.

This may as well be gone now.

You know, the League of Legends guys? This is going to upset someone, but the proof is there. Capcom has looked to nerf anything that is objectively ‘unfun’ to be losing against or to play against. For example, the grey health regeneration change is another hit to the defensive playstyle in general (Something that got kneecapped by the release of SF5 for whatever reason), further promoting an aggressive playstyle, lessening the tactical sandbox that fighting games tend to be for the sake of people not having to deal with turtl-y players or rewarding them for playing their style well. But at least it’s more fun, right?

 

Well, that depends on who you are, but Capcom doesn’t really care for that, they have pushed SF5 as the premier fighting game E-Sport, and that means not only do they seek players. but they seek viewers as well. You know what that means, or maybe you don’t, good thing I’m here, read on.

 

There’s no place in SF5 for anything that isn’t fun or easy to watch and understand.

If you played USF4, you know what I’m talking about. The constant back and forth movements of the characters and careful fireballs, the stare downs between a turtle style Ryu and Guile (Bet you forgot Guile used to be defensive). None of that has any place in this game, and I know someone is going to defend the game by saying there have been some arbitrarily small number of times where actual clear footsies have been played (You know, USF4 style), but those small numbers are in no way proportional to the almost year of time the game has existed. Why is it like this? Because new viewers can’t, or won’t care to watch the invisible high level gameplay and look into understanding what they’re seeing. Forcing people to do research isn’t how you retain casual players, or viewers, and Capcom knows it.

 

Capcom enjoys the Hollywood take on capitalizing on nostalgia

 

dlc

You’ve seen these characters before? I’ve seen these characters before.

 

“Hey guys, you want some balancing where we strengthen the characters strengths, and increase the prominence of their weaknesses in the event that we made them too strong?”

 

“Yes, papa Capcom! While we’re at it, can you bring back those beautifully unique characters like Makoto and Yang?”

 

“Oh you mean a powerful rushdown shoto like Akuma?”

 

“Well, no we already ha–”

 

“TAKE AKUMA AND PAY US!”

 

 

Do you agree with what I’ve said here? Do you think that these are good things? Do you feel like these will be the death of SF5? Do you just think I’m full of it and am a USF4 fanboy crying about not being able to adjust to the game? You can let me know these things and more on twitter @TirasCarr! Thanks for reading!

A Happy Game Haus Thankgiving

We decided a couple of weeks ago that we wanted to do a Thanksgiving piece and give our readers a chance to get to know us a little better! Below are some of the staff members of TGH telling you all what they are thankful for this holiday season. From Our Haus to Yours, have a very happy Game Haus Thanksgiving!

Jared MacAdam- Head of Esports: Well, I’ll go first, being the only Canadian and my Thanksgiving has passed quite some time ago. I’m thankful for the way this site has grown since its inception, how many great writers we’ve had and all the awesome content we’ve produced. I’m also immensely thankful for the way esports has matured in the past year; we’re seeing leaps and strides in key areas like players well being and stability. It’s an exciting thing to experience and to have a little part in. I’m also thankful for all the weirdos in the Front Office who lovingly mock my Canadianisms.

Josh Burris – Editor: I am thankful for sports. I am a proud Cleveland fan and with the exception of the Browns, good things are happening with our teams. I’m thankful I got to see a Cleveland team win a title. I am also thankful for my family and friendships I have at home, school, and from this site.

Ryan Moran – CFO: I am thankful for family, friends, and football. I am also thankful to be working for TGH and to belong to such an exciting community of sports and esports. I am also thankful of the unifying power of sports and their ability to bring anybody together win or lose.

Tim Miller – Vice President: Of course, when talking about being thankful, I have to be thankful for the opportunity to help lead The Game Haus. I’m also thankful to root for the mighty Ohio State Buckeye football team, and that Marvin Lewis should get fired after this year. I’m also thankful for a loving family and loving girlfriend. Finally, I’m thankful to live in a great country with freedoms like no other (no matter how you feel currently), and to go to a solid, christian university in Cedarville University.

Robert Hanes- President: While these last 365 days have been some of the most challenging times in my life, I can say that I have so many things to be grateful for. To start, everyone here at The Game Haus. These people are incredible, as you can read in their paragraphs of what they are thankful for. They have all gone through many things and have worked their butts off while working here. So thank you to all of the Front Office Members, Writers, Podcasters, and League Team Members! I am also very thankful for my friends. They have helped me through some tough times throughout the last year and I do not know where I would be without them. The same can be said for my Father, Mother and Sister. They have been my rocks as I have struggled many times this year. Lastly I am thankful to God and his son, while it sounds cheesy I know they have been with me every step of the way. From Our Haus to Yours, thank you and have a wonderful holiday season!

Terrance Singleton- Social Media Director: I am thankful for the life God has given me. Every time the holiday season comes around I think about how easily I couldn’t be here. My grandfather died on November 19, 2010 right before Thanksgiving. And I was in a pretty bad car accident on December 27, 2012 that broke my neck and cut my scalp open. So every time the holiday season rolls around I always think about how precious life, family, friends, and faith are important in my life and everyone’s life. So on this Thanksgiving when you are watching NFL football games and eating food until you can’t move, tell your loved ones how much you love them because tomorrow is not promised.

Dylan Streibig- NFL Writer: Whether we realize it or not, we all have a lot to be thankful for.  I am no exception this Thanksgiving or any other year. I am thankful to have a roof over my head and a family that loves me. I am grateful for the fantastic sporting events that go on all around the world. They provide me a momentary escape from my life with a physical disability. I am also thankful for my dog and the fact that I am now a published sports writer thanks to The Game Haus. Most of all, I am thankful for the loyalty of my close friends who do not give up on me, even when I give up on myself.

Matthew Hagan- Columnist: I’m thankful for the opportunity The Game Haus has presented me with. Writing about my favorite sport, football, and offering me a column has been one of the best things in my life. I am thankful to have parents, family and friends support while trying to get a degree in college. My mom has been the biggest reason I have made it this far and I am so thankful that I get to fly back to Vegas to spend Thanksgiving with her. I am also thankful I got to see the Cubs win a World Series and attend the victory parade in Chicago. It was one of the most memorable moments of my life. I am thankful for all the opportunities I have had in this amazing country. I am proud to be an American and this Thanksgiving is going to be one of the best ever. Thank you to everyone who reads my articles, weather you agree or disagree with them. I want to wish anyone who reads this, and anyone who may not, a safe, fun and amazing Thanksgiving.

Alex Keller- Recruitment and Retention: What am I thankful for? Where can I even begin… I guess it would have to be with my family and friends. I wouldn’t be in the position I am today if not for their love and support. But it’s so much more than that… the opportunity to even attend an institution like Georgia Tech, let alone graduate from it is an experience I’m incredibly thankful for. And of course, I have to thank everyone who’s been a part of making my experience with TGH so awesome. So, from our haus to yours, have a Happy Game Haus Thanksgiving everybody.

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