Armada’s Hot Streak Continues at Beast 7

Photo via Liquidpedia Smash

The contest for greatest Melee player of all time is no longer hyperbole when it comes to Armada (Adam Lindgren). The Swedish sniper, taking home another title at Beast 7 over countryman Leffen (William Hjelte), is another example of how far he’s taken his game in the past three months. He’s dismantling opponents.

Surprise Regions Make Top 8

Regardless, Armada’s strong play is not the main story of Beast 7. How can something so predictable be the main story? The main story was the strong play out of specific regions around the world. New England had its strongest tournament, possibly ever, with Slox (Anthony Detres) finishing top 8 and beating SFAT (Zac Cordoni).

Additionally, Europe showed up and played well. It was an all Europe top three, with Ice (Mustafa Akcakaya) taking down The Moon (Ryan Coker-Welch) to send the Americans home disappointed. On top of those three, Armada’s younger brother, Android (Andreas Lindgren), made the top 8 at his first major. He fell to the legendary European Sheik Amsah (Amsah D. Augustuszoon) but also finished first in doubles. It was a good weekend for the Lindgren clan as they were all there to celebrate the win in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Next, the Northern California trio of SFAT, Nintendude (Michael Brancato), and DizzKidBoogie (Kyle Athayde) had a rough weekend. SFAT failed to make his second consecutive top 8 at a major, losing to TheMoon and Slox. The two Ice Climber players failed to make it out of round two losers. It’s been a bad couple of weeks for the NorCal Melee scene.

Armada’s Switch to Fox vs. Leffen

Finally, let’s return to the grand finals and an extremely exciting top 8. The set between Leffen and TheMoon that provided viewers with an absolute bananas game five. The game on Pokémon stadium will be remembered for its intensity. Let’s now look at Armada pulling out the Fox and still managing to hold off Leffen long enough to win.

Two game fives. One in winners finals, the other in Grand Finals. Armada displayed a strong punish game in the Fox ditto, and a liking for Pokémon stadium’s vertical kill prowess. Armada showed he preferred to play the dash dance game by winning three games each on Dreamland and Pokémon Stadium. Leffen had his opportunities, but as Armada has shown in the past, he has the ability to win in those high intensity moments.

Armada is clearly on a hot streak and not even Leffen can slow him down. It’s hard to see anyone stopping his run of dominance any time soon. He seems to have figured out Hungrybox (Juan DeBiedma) for the time being, but players like Leffen, Mango (Joseph Marquez), and even potentially PPMD (Kevin Nanny) are lurking. Slaying the dragon that is Armada will be the story this year, IF, and that’s a big if, Armada loses. I wouldn’t bet on it.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

OGN Apex Weekly Roundup: Widowmaker Makes its Return into the Meta

The Widowmaker pick has made its valiant return to professional play. Overwatch’s competitive scene is moving back toward a more diverse team composition. Many characters are viable in this meta, and teams are starting to experiment.

The Apex league is where most of the experiments and well thought-out team compositions come into fruition. The strategies from these teams get carried across the world; basing it off of this week, sniper play is going to be imperative moving forward in this meta.

Now let’s get to the games.

KongDuesday

Photo via twitch.tv/ognglobal

The Tuesday games came up all KongDOO, as both the Uncia and Pantera squads played, and won convincingly. It’s no secret these are two of the better teams in Apex, but both teams coming out with a 3-0 result was unexpected. Both squads currently sit at 3-0 with a +6 in their respective groups.

First off, the Uncia team faced off against ConBox, who needed a win desperately to stay alive. Unfortunately for them, Uncia’s positioning and ultimate usage was on point. Uncia’s starting strategy on LI Jiang is to run directly into the point and defend. The back end healing of Lucid (Yoo Jun Seo) with his Ana or Panker’s (Lee Byung Ho) Reinhardt stayed strong. The positioning allowed for the two Uncia healers to stay safe.

The damage plays from DNCE (Kim Se Yong) and Butcher (Yoon Seong Won) were critical in the win. Butcher was the player of the game on Zarya. His forward, aggressive style allowed for him not only to deal plenty of damage, but to constantly have graviton surges available. The difference in this game ultimately stemmed from their ability to have more ultimates available in each game.

It wasn’t any gimmick either. Uncia stayed the course with the “power composition”: three tanks, one damage, and two supports. Biriding’s (Kim Ji Hyuk) high-ground cover on Soldier 76 on maps like Kings Row and Temple of Anubis put Conbox in terrible situations. The strategy for Uncia clearly centered around Birding’s ability to get good sight lines on high-ground.

Next off, Pantera showed the skill gap between them and the rest of their group. RunAway looked like a team capable of pulling off a massive upset, but not against Pantera. RunAway is still alive in the round two chase, but will have to go through Fnatic.

Testing out strategies seemed to play a major factor in KongDoo Pantera’s win. On the second map (Numbani), Pantera tried out a Torbjorn/Mei composition, and it paid off. Despite RunAway taking the less ideal lower route on Numbani, the Mei play of Rascal (Kim Dong Jim) was the difference maker. His ability to stall and throw out clutch blizzards to sustain a defense.

The snowball was in effect. Rascal took Mei to Hanamura and was the main reason Pantera got a full-hold on first point. The damage characters would get grabbed by RunAway, only to see Rascal use Mei’s ice wall to block off the chain and save their lives. After, Wakawaka (An Jee Ho) switched on to the Widowmaker and got two early headshots, making it a 6-4 team fight that eventually won Pantera the set and game.

It was clear the team more willing to make adjustments and try new compositions got rewarded. The frags weren’t always favoring Pantera, so being able to get a 3-0 shows this team’s knowledge of the game. Pantera and Uncia lock up their group two spots.

Foreign Invasion

Photo via twitch.tv/ognglobal

If Tuesday brought us strong Korean play, Friday brought us strong foreign play. Anyone who has followed the Overwatch competitive scene knows about EnvyUs’s skill. Misfits, on the other hand, aren’t as well known; but we saw some dominant play from the French side as well. EnvyUs sets up a group A championship with MetaAthena next week.

EnvyUs took care of business against the worst team in their group: BK Stars. BK Stars isn’t a joke, as they were a top-team in season one. But, they fell into the group of death, and that includes the world’s best: EnvyUs. It ended in a swift 3-0 victory for the American based team.

The story of the day was Taimou (Timo Kattenun) on Widowmaker, turning around entire team fights. His knowledge of specific angles showed on maps like Volskaya Industries. He had a few highlight reel plays that awarded EnvyUs control points.

The rest of the team showed up in other areas. HarryHook (Jonathon Tejedor aria) on the other DPS characters, primarily switching off Reaper and Soldier: 76 to deal with tank-heavy-compositions or play from the back line and get free shots. His positioning on Kings Row and Volskaya allowed for EnvyUs to stay spread out on control points. BK stars would search for shield battles with Reinhardt, and instead get caught in the crossfire father, EnvyUs.

Misfits stay alive

The French squad needed a win to stay alive, as did Afreeca Freecs Red. The only problem for Afreeca was Misfits had Tviq (Kevyn Lindstrom) and they didn’t.. arguably the worlds best player showed up again playing a multitude of characters. Mei, Soldier: 76, McCree, Tracer, and even some Hanzo play. Any character he took out of the vault worked last Friday.

Ultimate economy and positioning weren’t far off for either team in this match. The game was won and lost by getting players to the back-line and keeping those support players alive. Nevix (Andreas Karlsson) and Zave (Kalle Haag Nilsson) were instrumental in winning team fights with different sets of supports (mostly Ana and Lucio) for Misfits. Tviq’s ability to flank and get clear shots on healers and DPS ended most team fights positively for Misfits.

Outside of Tviq, Zebbosai (Sebastian Olson) on the Zarya did great amounts of damage. He was the one consistently building and landing successful ultimates. The forward play, as has become standard in this current meta-game, with the tanks, allowed for Misfits to get clean hooks and built ultimate charge on the tanks. Misfits took advantage of this with the constant flanking and their tendency to not take shield battles in favor of positioning.

Next week’s schedule
Afreeca Freecs Blue (0-1) will take on Cloud9 (1-0) on Tuesday for the second spot in group C. Fnatic (0-1) will face FlashLux (0-1) to try and keep pace with RunAway (1-1).

The Friday games aren’t as enticing with MVP Infinity vs. BK Stars who are both eliminated. LW Blue will also have to match Misfits by beating Afreeca Freecs Red. A win for LW Blue will put themselves in round two.

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Dreamhack Committing to Super Smash Bros In 2017

Dreamhack has committed to the Super Smash Bros scene by running six Smash tournaments in 2017 with an $100k prize pool. The long standing LAN centered event is making Smash, especially Melee, a permanent part of their events moving forward.

Photo via https://twitter.com/DreamHack?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

The six events will offer different games. All six events will feature Melee, but half of the events will also have Smash 4. Four of the events will be on North American soil (Austin, Montreal, Atlanta, and Denver) and the final two will be at the marquee event’s in Sweden (Winter, Summer). Dreamhack has expanded its reach across North America and is bringing Smash with it.

On top of a guaranteed spot at Dreamhack events in 2017, the winners will get a piece of the $100k prize pool at each event. The prize pool per event will average out at around $10k per tournament, which is well above the usual tournament average. Doll that out over six events and Dreamhack becomes essential to any top Smash player.

 

Dreamhack Committing to Smash’s Future Success

It’s clear that Dreamhack is listening to the wants and needs of the Smash community. Armada (Adam Lindgren) has been outspoken about his desire to grow Smash through Dreamhack. The local Swede has been great at building a relationship between the two. That also goes for community leader, D1 (D’Ron Maingrette), who pushed to bring Smash 4 to Dreamhack events.

The inclusion of Smash 4 into future tournaments is great news. It will give the scene even more exposure and provide Smash 4 players with a chunk out of the prize pool. It’s a sign that Smash isn’t just a trend within Esports. It’s a community that’s here to stay and Dreamhack seems to recognize that.

In the end, it’s another legitimate tournament option for professional players and the average Smash competitor. In a world of frequent tournaments, Dreamhack will be a staple because of the cash payouts and overall quality of their events. Smash has been looking for a circuit to latch onto and Dreamhack might be the one.

Marvel Wins a Sunday Spot at Evo 2017 Raising $77k For Charity

All is right in the world as Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 will be the ninth and final game at Evo 2017. After raising $77,000 for charity, the Marvel Community earned its way into Evo, barely edging out the second place game: Pokken. One of the most historic fighting game franchises will get its final sendoff Sunday at the Mandalay Bay Sports arena.

Mandalay Bay Evo 2016

The win, in large part, was due to the Marvel Community actively campaigning through different avenues to help raise funds. The names you’d expect to see rallying the troops to get their beloved game into the Super Bowl of fighting games. IFC Yipes (Michael Mendoza) held a fundraising stream, Angelic (Armando Mejia) was responsible for Undefeated 2017(a Marvel centered tournament), and Justin Wong dropped a spirit bomb to pull away in the last minutes of the vote.

In the same way, the entire Marvel Community helped donate. Marvel had less money on each donation, but almost twice as many donations as any other game. The community rallied behind a franchise that hasn’t not been at an Evo in 15 years. It was important for the entire fighting game community to get Marvel 3 in for one last hurrah.

Furthermore, the vote inspired the Evo staff to donate $10,000 to help Pokken tournaments in the future. Despite a valiant effort from the Pokken community, they unfortunately lost a close battle. But, this donation drive showed the love and compassion for that game. Finishing second isn’t what Pokken fans wanted, but it did legitimize their game and community. That won’t go unnoticed by the fighting game community.

From the start, it was clear the community wasn’t going to let Marvel fade slowly into the night. Everyone did a great job spreading the word and fighting for their game. It was a community effort and will give the Marvel Community a greater sense of purpose watching on finals day at Evo.

In the end, all the communities involved raised nearly $150k for charity. It wasn’t a perfect system. It pitted fighting game fans against each other, but despite a few hiccups, it was all done respectfully.

How to change the system?
This was the second go-around for the Evo staff doing a community funded vote. The first time was a unique idea that had never been explored. That idea also gave way to the Super Smash Bros Melee renaissance. It wasn’t a perfect plan, but it did inspire and bring together an entire community.

The question needs to be asked, will this do the same for Marvel? It’s yet to be seen, but when a community joins together for a common good, it strengthens the very foundation. The vote was never intended to divide fighting game fans. It’s a way to gauge which game the fighting game community wants represented at its largest event.

I have no answer for a better system. Games will always be left out. That’s the nature of Evo. In this sense, each community has equal footing. It’s not meant to be divisive, but passionate fans will sometimes go down that road. With all the new fighting game releases, Evo has to do something like this to, first, keep fans happy, and second, keep the games with most interest at Evo.

For now, Marvel 3 gets another shot before Marvel Infinite hits the shelves. It will be a great sendoff to a game that has brought us some of the best and most interesting story lines since its release. Will Evo do a vote in 2018? I don’t know. But watch the strength and resolve from the Marvel Community.

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Undefeated 2017: Supporting the Marvel Community, Plus Results

The Marvel vs. Capcom community is in a fight for its life trying to get into Evo. Events such as Undefeated 2017 in Mesa, Arizona are keeping the hopes alive. Marvel players from all over the country flew in to attend a Marvel event thrown by Marvel players.

On top of a great Marvel tournament with tons of talent in attendance, Undefeated also held Street Fighter V and a Guilty Gear tournament. The SFV tournament gave us our first look at KBrad (Kenneth Bradley) vs. Justin Wong since the notorious video of KBrad calling out Justin Wong for leaving Evil Geniuses for Echo Fox.

It was a grassroots event, held in a beercade, thrown by Arizona’s own Angelic (Armando Mejia), ALL to support the Marvel community. The love of the game and community was apparent at the venue. It was clear that this group of players are a family. And despite a game that’s declining in numbers, this community stands strong.

The results: SFV
SFV turned out to be hype, with the first set between KBrad and Justin Wong since the transition. It also had Chris G (Chris Gonzales), who finished second at Kumite in Tennessee only a few weeks prior. The smaller numbers were no indication of the level of play at Undefeated.

However, the legend that is Justin Wong did end up taking the tournament, after being sent to losers early on in top 8 by KBrad. It was a reverse sweep for KBrad, as his Cammy did a great job making Justin fight out of the corner. Despite being sent to losers, Jwong wasn’t deterred, as he won 15 of his next 16 matches. He had wins over Chris G, PNOY (Richard Kline), and the aforementioned KBrad.

1 Justin Wong
2 KBrad
3 Chris G
4 PNOY
5 Clegg Madness
5 Rath
7 Redman
7 Moss_HD

UMVC3
The main event was commentated by the well regarded East Coast Marvel legend IFC Yipes (Michael Mendoza). If Yipes shows up, it must be a hype Marvel event, and the level of play delivered. Besides FChamp (Ryan Ramirez), every Marvel 3 Evo champion was in attendance: Justin Wong, Chris G, and Kane Blue River (Nicholas Gonzales). That’s not even mentioning top players such as RayRay (Raynel Hidalgo), Cloud805 (Jonathon Morales), and RyanLV (Ryan Romero).

The best part was every former Evo champion was eliminated fairly early in bracket. It’s not clear how much time players are investing into Marvel nowadays, but the Gods of the game are now getting passed up. Jwong, KBR, and RayRay all finished outside the top 8. ChrisG barely made it into the top 3, beating Cloud805 and Jibrill in close game-five sets.

It wasn’t the results normally associated with Marvel, but it provided the extra drama. RyanLV wasn’t considered one of the best coming into today, but he leaves Undefeated as the champion. He didn’t face any Gods, but he tore up Winners bracket, beating Flux (3-0), YLTCole (3-1), and Angelic twice in winners and grands (3-1,3-1). It was a statement win, taking the first big Marvel tournament of 2017.

1 RyanLV
2 Angelic
3 Chris G
4 Jibrill
5 YLT Cole
5 Priest
7 NoelBrown
7 Cloud805

Guilty Gear XRD
1 Nerd Josh
2 Thebeatifuldude
3 Koogy
4 Toki
5 Dead Spike
5 Paracles
7 Ryyudo
7 Dejixal

You can like The Game Haus on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Overwatch Apex Season 2 Week 3 Recap

Week 3 hit right after the latest 1.7 patch, so teams weren’t hesitant to try out new team compositions. We saw a two sniper composition out of Meta Athena. The standard three tank, one DPS, and two support made its return, but in limited showing. The 2-2-2 balance also made a return, as Genji is prominently back in the center of the meta-game.

This week also displayed the newest control point map in Oasis. Teams had interesting strategies, mostly trying to push teams into the smaller choke points. It should be featured in more Overwatch tournaments and events in the future. Now let’s talk about this week’s matchups.

photo via twitch.tv/ognglobal

Meta Athena vs. MVP Infinity

Meta Athena moves to 2-0 (+4) in the group of death (Group A), taking out MVP Infinity 3-2. MVP moves to 0-2 (-2) and is now in need of a miracle to make it out of the group one stages. The win for Meta sets up a group A finals between them and the current number one ranked team in the world, EnvyUs, in a couple weeks.

The match from last night provided plenty of highlight reel plays from both sides, but especially out of the main DPS players from Meta Athena in Sayaplayer (Ha Jeong Woo), Libero (Kim Hye Sung), and the aggressive Zarya play out of Hoon (Choi Jae Hoon). The aggressive style on maps like Illios and Hanamura gave Meta the edge, allowing for strong team pushes while Sayaplayer flanked primarily with his Tracer.

MVP prepared more set plays and specific setups and that ultimately backfired as they weren’t able to adjust to Meta’s constant character swapping. For example, the Torbjorn pick from Undine (Son Yeong Woo) on Hanamura was sound on first point, but once Meta was able to power through first and move on to second with better ultimate economy, the Torbjorn became useless.

The set plays on Numbani and the tough defense on Route 66 kept MVP in it until game five. The turning point was the double sniper composition from Meta. Libero on the Hanzo and Sayaplayer on Widowmaker. The unexpected picks and skill from both players showed through as they were able to get 11 combined final blows on first point Kings Row to eventually take the map and the game. The overall decision making on team compositions, ultimate strategies, and positioning favored Meta Athena.

Runaway vs FlashLux

In a week of back-and-forth sets, Runaway did exactly what their name sake implies: runaway with the victory. The amateur, pink jacket wearing Korean squad showed they are to be taken seriously regardless of the attire they wear. Runaway took out FlashLux 3-0 and is now tied with KongDoo Panthera at the top of group D.

photo via twitch.tv/ognglobal

The synergy and team skill clearly showed. The heavy use of Genji out of Haksal (Kim Hyo Jong) played a huge factor in the team’s win. He carried the team in damage and had plenty of instances where he’d pull out a four-kill team fight. The clever use of dragon blade and his unique ability to get great angles by Genji’s wall-climbing seemed to be the difference in this one. FlashLux had no answer.

On top of Haksal, Kaiser’s (Ryu Sang Hoon) damage output and shield pressure on Reinhardt was impressive. He kept the front line secure and safe. This allowed for players like Haksal and BUMPER (Park Sang Beom) to be more aggressive against the FlashLux supports players.

The positioning was key in RunAway’s win, as they kept pinning Flash Lux in small corridors and finishing them with either graviton surges or earth shatters; this allowed Stitch (Lee Choong Hui) and Haksal to do plenty of damage on Tracer and Genji. With a strong focus on the DPS players, RunAway has a chance to take group D.

KongDoo Uncia vs. Afreeca Freecs Blue

KD Uncia showed up in their win over Afreeca Freecs Blue and moved themselves closer to taking group C. The steady play from one of the top Korean teams on some of the more underplayed maps was impressive. Winning on Oasis, Kings Row, and Watchpoint: Gibralter while sticking primarily with the current meta in terms of team composition.

Lunatic Hai vs. LW Blue

Lunatic Hai essentially sealed up their group B victory with a 3-1 win over LW Blue. The excellent play of their top DPS player Whoru (Lee Seung Joon), who’s arguably been the APEX MVP through the first three weeks, and Miro (Gong Jin-Hyuk) on the Reinhardt has been a major part of this teams’ 2-0 record. Top that with some of the most consistent support plays from Tobi (Yang Jin-mo) and Ryujehong (Ryu Je-Hong) and it’s one of the strongest teams in the entire league.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Stream.Me’s Kombat Cup Season Two Announced, Featuring SonicFox and Noble Esports

Stream.Me’s Kombat Cup Circuit season two is here, bringing back several of the world’s best Mortal Kombat players. This includes season one champion and undisputed best player in the world SonicFox (Dominique McLean). The four-month tournament circuit will provide a $12,000 prize pool that will be distributed throughout the event. The season finale will take place on May 14th.

The Mortal Kombat scene needed a breath of fresh air. Dedicated players are running out of viable tournaments to attend. This is apparent considering the upcoming release of Injustice 2, which will most likely be replacing MKXL as the NRS tournament game. The Kombat Cup will give players a chance to play and win money playing Mortal Kombat XL.

The field of players is stacked once again for Kombat Cup season two. On top of SonicFox, his teammate Scar (Brad Vaughn) will be participating. Both players are widely considered as two of the best to ever play the game. The Noble Esports MKXL division will also be a major player in the Kombat Cup. Dragon (Ryan Walker), Illuusions (Richard Luu), and Tweedy (Tommy Tweedy) will be back after a successful season one, making it all the way to the season finale.

(SonicFox in his classic Fox hat, courtesy of Stream.Me)

It won’t be an easy road for the returning champ. After finishing second in league play, both Illuusions and Dragon took SonicFox to game five in the season finale before ultimately falling. Players are starting to catch up.

Registration opens on February 5th and the circuit starts on February 12th. Each week will have three separate events. Included will be the top eight qualifier (open play), the Wednesday Weekly Finale, and Konquest on Thursday. On top of earning prize money, each event will be worth qualifying points that goes towards making it to the season finale in May.

Stream.Me will provide the weekly tournament coverage as they continue to support the MKXL community. The Kombat Cup will bring eyes to a game vying for that final spot at Evo 2017, and leagues like this should help the cause. Watch to see if SonicFox can defend his title and stay virtually unbeaten in Mortal Kombat.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Evo 2017 Lineup Announced, Community Funded Vote to Decide Ninth Game

 

The Evo lineup has been announced: Street Fighter V, Super Smash Bros for Wii U, Super Smash Bros Melee, Guilty Gear XrD Rev 2, BlazBlue: Central Fiction, Injustice 2, Tekken 7, King Of Fighters XIV, and lastly a community funded donation drive vote featuring nine games.

photo via twitch.tv/redbullesports

It was also announced that Evo will be moving away from the Las Vegas convention center and into Mandalay Bay where they held finals day in 2016. The move coincides with the fact that shuttles were necessary to bus people to and from the venue last year. The event will be held July 14-16th so mark your calendars.

The main focus now is the community funded donation drive. The same way Melee made an Evo appearance and started the renaissance, another community funded game will get that chance. This includes SkullGirls that barely missed out on an Evo spot in 2013. The Marvel community who was left out of the main lineup for the first time ever will also have a shot to make it to Evo through donations.

(Photo via twitch.tv/redbullesports)

Here’s the kicker, the winner of the donation drive gets a spot in the arena during Sunday finals. So, it’s not only a chance to get a tournament at Evo, but now the game that gets voted in will get the extra exposure from the massive viewership on Sunday at Evo. On top of that, four new games will be making an appearance on the Sunday main stage: Smash 4, BlazBlue, Tekken 7, Injustice 2, and the players choice will make up finals day.

Unfortunately, the push to help growing communities by placing them on Sunday has relegated Super Smash Bros Melee back to Saturday night. The second most watched game in the last three years will be a two-day tournament and Top-8 will be ran outside of the arena. KOFXIV also missed the cut.

However, Mr. Wizard (Joey Cuellar) tweeted out that Melee finals will not be on Saturday morning, like how Smash 4’s top-8 in 2016 was early in the morning. The Evo staff listened to the complaints of the community and adjusted. The logistics of a two-day event for potentially 2,000 players is murky, but the Evo staff is well prepared and experience with a tournament of this length and size.

Evolution 2017 is expected to see some growth once again. People need to remember it’s a showcase of fighting games and their communities and not centered around just one game. If you’re a Marvel player and you’re mad that the game didn’t get in initially, show the Evo staff just how strong the Marvel communities is by coming together and winning the vote. Melee rose from the ashes in 2013 and now Smash is a staple in the Evo lineup.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Immortals Wins The NGE Overwatch Winter Premiere

Photo via twitter.com/immortals

From start-to-finish, the Immortals Overwatch squad looked like the best team in the Winter Premiere. After two months of dominating play, Immortals was able to take home the NGE Winter Premiere title at Pax South over Ghost Gaming 3-1.

It wasn’t an easy road to the finals, as Immortals had to fight through four qualifying events just to make it to Pax South. After breezing through the open play, Immortals hit their stride in the group phase, finishing first with a 4-1 record (9-5 game count). The only team that gave them trouble was the team they just defeated in the finals.

Ghost Gaming (formerly Kungarna) transformed from an unsponsored team to one of the most dangerous teams in the entire Winter Premiere. Every game, they seemed to improve and develop more chemistry in terms of positioning and team fights. Unfortunately, Immortals was the one team with enough skill and team synergy to hold off the talented Ghost Gaming squad.

Even without Nomy (David Ramirez), who couldn’t make it due to visa issues according to an Immortals spokesperson, the overall talent was enough to win the event. Immortals had to rely on their former support, Chance (Zac Palmer), to play Reinhardt. Nomy was arguably the best Reinhardt in the entire Winter Premiere. Immortals winning without him shows just how strong the team is.

The play of GrimReality (Christopher Schafer) and Agilities (Brady Girardi) were great throughout the Winter Premiere. In the four tank Overwatch meta, the Roadhog out of Agilities and the Zarya from Grim carried this team. Now, even with the meta moving away from tank heavy compositions, Grim’s McCree and Agilities’ Genji separated them from other teams.

In the finals, GrimReality was unreal. Immortals would place him on high-ground and let him do work. It almost looks like aim bot, but it’s just Grim showing off his ability to turn team fights. Even down a player, he gets instant head shots. He had multiple rounds with four or five kill team fights. It forced Ghost to target him down, leaving everyone susceptible to the strong ultimate play from Immortals.

Immortals ended up 6-1 on LAN, taking out Luminosity Gaming 3-0 in the semifinals. Immortals did a terrific job switching up team compositions, which is especially important considering the 1.7 patch just dropped two days before the event. At times, they’d switch off the classic Ana/Reinhardt and go Zenyatta/Winston. This didn’t work, but showed they were willing to try new things. In the end, getting away from the three tank compositions gave the opposition some issues.

Aythen (Athen Zhu) worked both as a healer and DPS with Ana, allowing Grimreality to get behind the enemy front with Tracer or McCree’s Dead Eye. It was a total team effort. Hyped (George Maganzini) had the most optimal use of his ultimates. He would usually clear out space with his D.Va self-destructs or strong Zarya graviton surges. All six members were crucial for Immortals to get to this spot.

It’s still early in Overwatch’s competitive life-cycle, but Immortals shows that they can compete with anyone. Next step will be seeing if they can handle the top European and Korean teams; but winning the NGE Winter Premiere is a good first step towards world domination.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Armada Secures His Place in History Winning Genesis 4

Photo courtesy of twitch.tv/VGbootcamp

Adam “Armada” Lindgren cemented his spot in history, winning his third Genesis title. The win came over Joseph “Mango” Marquez, making it three wins in a row in a Genesis Grand Final for Armada. Armada’s run of dominance continues as he narrowly edges out Mango in the winner’s bracket and follows it up with one of his strongest finals performances ever.

Mango and Armada were destined from the start to meet again in Grand Finals. In four Genesis tournaments, no other players have made Grand Finals. It took Armada squeezing by Johnny “S2J” Kim in top 64 to even stay in winner’s bracket, and then avoiding losing 3-1 to Jason “Mew2King” Zimmerman in winner’s finals. At the same time, Mango had one of the more difficult losers bracket runs to make this rematch possible.

After falling 3-1 to Armada, Mango went straight into a loser’s bracket match with William “Leffen” Hjelte, who fell into losers before top 8. In a rather sub-par top 8, Leffen vs. Mango stands out as a must-watch match. The intensity and stakes of this moment added the extra pressure, and made for a wild set. Mango took the 3-2 victory, but that’s after falling behind 2-1 in games, and even down in stocks on both games four and five. It was a set that will be remembered.

Genesis is known for its memorable moments. Mostly because of the rivalry between Mango and Armada that started at Genesis back in 2009. Four Genesis’s and still no other player has broken into the top-two. M2K had the best chance to break up the streak at G4, when he was up a stock on game four, up 2-1. But in the end, Mango and Armada found themselves facing off in Grand Finals.

The finals matchup that seemed as if destiny had intervened, felt lackluster in the end. Armada thoroughly dominated Mango, beating him in less than nine minutes, with a three-stock victory on game three. Armada went 6-1 overall against Mango, and a staggering 4-0 on Yoshi Island, which was Mango’s primary counter-pick.

Mango seemed to have used up all his mental fortitude just getting back to Grand Finals and wasn’t mentally prepared for the robot that is Armada’s punish heavy Peach. It was a showing of Armada’s consistency and mental strength, as even when he’s down 2-0 to S2J or losing to M2K, he never plays like he’s out of it. He always sticks to the game plan.

Here are the final results at Genesis 4:

1.Alliance Armada (Peach/Fox)

2. C9 Mango (Fox/Falco)

3. Echo Fox M2K (Marth/Sheik)

T5. Liquid Hungrybox (Jigglypuff)

T5. Panda Global Plup (Sheik)

T7. Tempo Storm Axe (Pikachu)

T7. G2 Westballz (Falco)

 

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Page 1 of 512345