ELEAGUE Street Fighter V Kicks Off With Unexpected Results

photo courtesy of twitch.tv/eleague

Fighting games have gone full blown esports. The preliminary round of ELEAGUE’s inaugural Street Fighter V tournament kicked off today with a strong slue of players competing in Group A. The matches were broadcasted live at the Atlanta studio and officially started the new era of fighting game tournaments.

Furthermore, it was the fighting game community’s first look at a new type of tournament. One with commercial breaks and invitation only. The broadcast lasted six hours, and only a small percentage was actual gameplay. This is not a critique, it’s just the facts. The best of three made for quicker games, making the host fill long periods of dead air time.

Regardless, the production value was outstanding, and the games overall provided some entertaining Street Fighter. Any criticism is met with the fact that it was their first attempt at a fighting game broadcast. All things considered, they did a great job. The lack of normalcy from a fighting game tournament was lost, but the overall event was a success.

1. Victor “Punk” Woodley, 6-1, Advances to Semifinals
Punk’s recent success is no mistake. His Karin play has pushed the Meta-game. Based off of today’s results, he is a serious contender to take the ELEAGUE title. His 6-1 record was impressive, with his one loss coming to Infiltration’s Juri. No one could consistently deal with his unrelenting corner pressure.

2. Yusuke “Momochi” Momochi, 5-2, Advances to Semifinals
Momochi hasn’t been as effective lately, but today his Ken came to play. He had wins over Infiltration’s Rashid, Smug’s Balrog, and only fell to Punk and surprisingly Marn. Momochi dealt with plenty of game three, last round situations, so it wasn’t an easy road. He did qualify for semifinals with his win over Infiltration.

3. Bryant “Smug” Huggins, 5-2, Advances to quarterfinals
After a disappointing season one, Smug is back in season two with Balrog and hitting harder than anyone. His punish game coupled with Balrog’s damage output is a perfect fit. One mistake and Smug would essentially end the game with his corner carry and use of EX-hits to extend combos to end rounds. It felt like he was back playing Dudley and styling on players.

4. Thomas “Brolynho” Proença, 4-3, Advanced to quarterfinals
Possibly the surprise of the day was Brolynho finishing fourth in the group. He was placed in a win-or-go-home scenario, and ended up winning two clutch sets against Marn and Julio. His mix-ups and recognition of the situation with Necali was impressive. Despite tough losses to Momochi, Smug, and Punk, he had strong wins over Infiltration to finish third.

5. Seonwoo “Infiltration” Lee, 4-3, Advances to quarterfinals
The second real look at season two Infiltration gave us two new characters and mixed results. He had answers for Ken with Rashid, but struggled with his new main in Juri in some situations. It’s a work in progress for Infiltration, and that showed with his 4-3 record. He’s still a player to keep an eye on heading into the next round.

6. Julio Fuentes, 2-5, advances to quarterfinals
Julio had a rough day. He was having difficulties in neutral with his Ken and couldn’t build late damage combos consistently. He did have times were he excelled with insane comebacks with V-trigger. His two wins came over Ricki Ortiz and the must-win 2-1 over Marn to advance. He’ll have to make adjustments if he wants to advance to the semifinals.

7. Martin “Marn” Phan, 2-5, eliminated

Marn. Photo courtesy of twitch.tv/eleague

Marn was undoubtedly the most entertaining part of day one. Despite being eliminated, Marn’s antics provided plenty of hard laughs. His Ibuki play was no joke. However, it feels as if he’ll need more time with Ibuki before he has success. In most of his losses, he kept it extremely close and barely got edged out in a few sets. Hopefully we see the newly sponsored Marn at more events.

8. Ricki Ortiz, 0-7, eliminated
Tier list matters, and that’s proven by the second place finisher at Capcom Cup going 0-7 at ELEAGUE. Cammy got nerfed to the ground, and after a disappointing 33rd place finish at Final Round and going 0-7 today, Ricki is questioning her character choices.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Dabuz Wins 2GGC: Civil War Avoiding Upset Saturday

Dabuz after winning Civil war. Photo courtesy of twitch.tv/2ggaming

No one was prepared for the onslaught that took place at 2GGC: Civil War. It not only left the tournaments namesake sitting on the sidelines for top 8, but propelled Samuel “Dabuz” Robert Buzby towards his first super major win in Smash 4. The win came over seven unique characters, including two characters that have never made it to a top 8 at a major before.

The one constant, in a tournament of upsets, was Dabuz’s steady play. No matter the matchup, he stuck to his game plan and made players earn hits on his Rosalina. It was an impressive effort. One of the most consistent top-8 finishers in Smash 4 finally got his pay day.

His road to the finals was matched with complete uncertainty as top players began to fall early on Saturday. The first domino to fall came from Gonzalo “ZeRo” Barrios, of Team ZeRo. He fell to the California Fox main Matthew “Xzax” Liberatore and later, in the match of the tournament, to Arizona’s Zero Suit Samus main Andrew “Luhtie” Lataille. He was the first top-five player eliminated, all the way back at losers round two.

Futhermore, the upsets didn’t stop with ZeRo. Leonardo “MKLeo” Lopez Perez barely made it out of pools, falling to two lesser known, but strong California players. Meteor, out of nowhere, sent MKLeo to losers before falling to Armando “AC” Castenada Villalobos, 3-2, in losers round one. It was a bloodbath.

Additionally, Nairoby “Nairo” Quezada looked prime to win the event with so many players eliminated after day one, but he eventually became part of the fray. Griffin “Fatality” Miller, the eventual runner-up sent him back home in ninth place (are you detecting a pattern?). The final straw was Eric “Esam” Lew pulling out the Samus to eliminate captain Canada, Elliot “Ally”Bastien Carroza-Oyarce.

ESAM after beating Ally. Photo courtesy of twitch.tv/2ggaming

The upsets led to exciting sets with loud screams ringing out all over the Esports Arena venue. The atmosphere of the outside stage added extra pressure to an already pressurized tournament. It’s the first time a tournament had been held outside on a street. The city of Santa Ana deserves praise for allowing the 2GG crew to throw a great tournament.

Character Diversity

Outside the upsets, the character diversity is the most noteworthy aspect of this tournament. A Link, Captain Falcon, and Rosalina finished in the top-three. Donkey Kong made his first appearance in a top 8. The top tier characters all failed to make an appearance with the exception of Zack “Captain Zack’s” Lauth Bayonetta.

However, the play of Japanese Link main “T” was the main story. His aggressive style Link was not only optimally strong but enjoyable to watch. The bomb recoveries will be a mainstay in the Link metagame as T redefined Link. Eita “Hikaru” Hoshi also became a crowd favorite with his DK. The heavyweight Donkey Kong was made effective through Hikaru’s ability to win neutral and convert into lower-percentage kills.

Regardless, Fatality’s epic run to Grand Finals can’t be ignored. Before losing to Dabuz, Fatality went on an insane run of wins. He beat Rei “Komorikiri” Furukawa 3-1, followed by a reverse 3-0 over Nairo. That momentum carried over from beating Nairo all the way through top 8 and into Grand Finals. He lost a close set to T in winners but ended up 3-0’ing him in losers.

Dabuz Delivers

It was finally Dabuz’s time and it came at the most opportune moment. What is now known as “the most stacked tournament of all time,” as said by Zak “Coney” Z, Dabuz will always be remembered for avoiding the upsets and taking it home. His methodical, never approach style finally had an edge against players more prone to fall for his Rosalina traps. He’s a brick wall and now the Civil War champion.

In a turn of events, after the Noriyuki “Kirihara” Kirihara win at Frame Perfect Series 2, Dabuz regained the title of best Rosalina player worldwide with his big win at Civil War. He also beat Kirihara with a rather dominate 3-0. It was Dabuz’s tournament to lose and he came through.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

2GGC Civil War – Team Ally Eyeing the Upset

SANTA ANA, CA – THE Smash 4 rivalry has reached new heights. Gonzalo ZeRo” Barrios and Elliot “Ally” Bastien Carroza-Oyarce have always been rivals, dating back to the days of Brawl, but now all that will culminate into one massive event this weekend: 2GGC’s Civil War.

Photo via twitch.tv/vgbootcamp

The creation of this tournament is that of legend. Everyone’s favorite Smash player, Larry Lurr, presented the idea to the good people of 2GG and thus the Civil War was birthed into this world, a tournament centered around the rivalry of the best. Each team is comprised of nearly every player in the PGR top 50. A small proposal from Larry Lurr has blossomed into a super major with a $30,000 pot bonus and is now looked at as one of the premier events of 2017.

It’s known how dominate ZeRo’s run in Smash 4 has been since the game’s release. The few blemishes on his record led to Ally taking the spotlight, including his win at one of the most prestigious events in Smash at Evo 2016.

Thus, jealously and envy turned to action and now teams have formed around the respected players.

#TeamAlly or #TeamZeRo?

It’s a choice every player had to make before entering. Do players stick it out with the world’s best in ZeRo? Or take a chance with the underdog who can pull off the upset?

This fight could decide the fate of humanity…

Let’s look at the teams:

Team ZeRo:

It’s no secret: Team ZeRo is absolutely stacked to the brim with talent. Of the top 10 ranked players in the world, Zero’s team consists of six of them, including ZeRo himself who is a untethered beast. So, right off the bat, it’s going to be an uphill climb for team Ally.

The true weakness of team ZeRo is the second team. The roster does have strong players, but there’s no distinct advantage. The late addition of Kirihara, winner of Frame Perfect Series 2, will give the second team a definite boost with his Rosalina play. The strength in the second team lies at the top of the roster: Gavin “Tweek” Dempsey, Saleem “Salem” Akiel Young, and Chris “WaDi” Boston all have had tremendous success and could be the driving force behind a team ZeRo win on the second team.

Additionally, The one-two-three of ZeRo, Nairoby “Nairo” Quezada, and Leonardo “MKLeo” Lopez Perez is arguably unbeatable. It’s tough seeing how Team Ally matches up against these three. It will come down to team decisions, on both sides, but if Ally allows one of those three to get hot, it will be an issue. Can anyone slow down ZeRo? Ally’s team has four players who have taken sets off ZeRo in the past (five including Kirihara).

Outside of the big three, Ally will have to deal with James “VoiD” Makekau-Tyson, Rei “Komorikiri” Furukawa and Jason “ANTi” Bates, who’re all serious tournaments threats with a variety of characters. The key is to take advantage of the less notable players. Freddie “FOW” Omar Williams is the best Ness in the world but he can be directly countered and Alberto “Trela” Miliziano hasn’t been active so his performance is up in the air.

Undoubtedly, Team ZeRo is the favorite, but Ally has the tools to make the upset happen.

Team Ally

Ally has a tough but doable task in front of him. The use of his top players with their more unorthodox play styles will be essential to victory. Takuto “Kameme” Ono is one player who will need to go the distance. His Mega Man can be a real problem for Team ZeRo as he’s taken sets off four of them (ZeRo, Kmorikiri, VoiD, and MKLeo). Couple that with Yuto “Abadango” Kawamura’s MewTwo and it coule be a problem.

Presumably, it seems as if Ally will have to go head-to-head with ZeRo to try his neutralize him. Ally has the most current set wins over ZeRo (five) and has a great way of dealing with ZeRo’s control game. The onus is most likely on him to beat the world’s most dominate player. The rest is manageable if they can get over that hurdle.

If Julian “Zinoto” Carrington and Marcus “Pink Fresh” Wilson can tap into that potential that we saw at events like CEO and 2GGT: KTAR Saga it could be a different story. Ally will have to make the right decisions with these two along with Tyler “Marss” Martins and Nicholas “Ned” Dovel, who have all taken sets off players on the other team.

Anyways, let’s not forget about the staying power of Ramin “Mr. R” Delshad and Dabuz who can be an annoyance to the top players on Team ZeRo. Both have also taken sets off ZeRo, so if Ally chooses to try and gain an advantage by putting himself up against anyone but ZeRo he’ll have a backup plan.

In terms of the second team, it looks to be another uphill battle with most members ranking below their opponents. Luckily, Captain Zack has had a renaissance with Bayonetta recently and has made himself a serious threat. He will be the headliner and the player to watch out for. If players like Eric “ESAM” Lew and Rich Brown play well it could be a different story for Team Ally.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Kirihara Wins His First Tournament Ever at Frame Perfect Series 2

It’s been an impressive couple of weeks for the Japanese Smash 4 scene. Random Japanese players, in their first American tournament, have come in and had tremendous success against American competition. First, Tsu at Frostbite, now Kirihara (Noriyuki Kirihara) at Frame Perfect Series 2 as he took Grand Finals over the world’s best, ZeRo (Gonzalo Barrios).

Photo via twitter.com/mvgleague

Additionally, it’s the first Rosalina main since Dabuz (Samuel Robert Buzby) to win a major. The “Japanese ZeRo” surprised us all, winning his first Smash 4 tournament EVER at a major in the United States. His road to his first title came rather easily. He didn’t drop a set the entire tournament, and beat ZeRo in straight sets 3-2, 3-2.

Japan’s hidden bosses are coming out of the woodwork. A region that’s been known to have a strong Smash 4 scene is finally backing it up with results. Komorikiri, who’s basically a United States citizen, made another deep Losers run, sending home Dabuz and getting revenge for the legendary “.9” moment at Genesis 4 against Captain Zack (Zack Lauth).

It was a strong showing from Japan. The road to ZeRo wasn’t easy for the eventual champion, having close sets with Mr. E’s (Eric Weber) Marth (3-2), and ESAM’s (Eric Lee) Pikachu. He proved Rosalina is much better than the general perception. His use of Luma even proceeds the consensus world’s best Rosalina in Dabuz. If Luma is still alive, it’s extremely tough to approach or escape Kirihara’s approaches.

A trend is developing, visit the US and face ZeRo in Grand Finals. It’s been known how deep the Japanese scene is, but now it’s being displayed right before our eyes. Even Tsu, who nearly beat ZeRo, said that there’s a lot of players better than him back home, and he’s correct. The turf war for Smash 4 dominance begins now.

Hungrybox holds it down in home state

The Melee tournament was a disappointment. The favorites either decided not to play or only play half-halfheartedly. It setup for expected results without much excitement behind it.

That said, Hungrybox (Juan DeBiedma) deserves a ton of credit. He was able to just come out, play Melee, and win. He didn’t overthink it. Hbox knew he had the advantage in top 8 and rode that all the way to another win.

Unfortunately, the fans didn’t get the classic Armada (Adam Lindgren) vs. Hungrybox Grand Finals, or Mango (Joseph Marquez) making a losers run; but this event seemed to be a warm up for Full Bloom 3 next weekend. Mango clearly was apathetic towards this event, going Captain Falcon all the way through top 48. He lost 3-0 to Drunksloth (Jay Dahya), who had a strong weekend, finishing in the top 8, and Kels (Kelly Smith) who also finished in the top 8.

Armada was in attendance, but decided to only play doubles. It’s not clear why players were dropping out, but it left a dull product at times. As a Melee purist, I could watch any match and be happy, but most fans would see Mango or Armada and shut the stream off.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

The Runback: Street Fighter V Patch Notes, Evo Japan Update, and FPS2 Preview

It’s another busy week in the fighting game community. We’ll cover the new Street Fighter V update, Evo Japan dates, and a preview of Frame Perfect Series 2 in Orlando, Florida. The Killer Instinct World Cup also wrapped up last Saturday, we’ll take a look back at the KI community’s biggest event.

Street Fighter V Season 2 Patch

The rumors of a possible patch before the start of Season 2 were (somewhat) true. A week after Final Round 20, Capcom released a patch with minimal nerfs. As expected, Capcom essentially went through and adjusted the smaller aspects.

Accordingly, the game has seemingly shifted towards grappler-type characters. There’s no overarching mechanical changes outside the fact that the risk-reward system is now amplified with no jump back option select. The direction of how Capcom wants players to play this game is clear: BURST DAMAGE ABOVE ALL (sorry for yelling)!

It’s likely that this will be Capcom’s last patch in Season 2. Players will now have the rest of the season to refine their characters. Ibuki won the first major CapCup event, but Mike and Guile had a strong showing. Balrog seems unexplored and ready to become a real tournament contender.

Evo Japan: January 26-28, 2018


The date is set and it’s actually happening. Evo is going across the pacific to Akihabara, near Tokyo. The wait will only be a full-year, but Evo will once again expand into a two-event circuit. Japan is also an obvious choice for the next Evo as a large population of the country plays fighting games.

It’s an ode to the strong Japanese community that has spent years flying west to the United States. It will be the first Evo outside America and should display the quality depth of Japan’s street Fighter V, anime, and 3D fighters. Many top players are already considering making the trip to Evo Japan.

Frame Perfect Series 2

FPS2, a Smash event in Florida, will host four of the Melee gods and a litany of other top players from the region. The majority of the Smash 4 top 15 will also be in attendance to face the strong Florida Smash 4 scene. The tournament will feature runner-up at Frostbite 2017 Tsu and his Lucario.

Additionally, the Japan crew will be making an appearance in Smash 4. The event will be focused on top player vs. the field. Is it possible anyone outside of Armada (Adam Lindgren) and ZeRo (Gonzales Barrios) win in either game? The last five months say don’t take the bait, pick the favorites. Players have gotten close, but just haven’t finished the job.

The event will feature eight top-20 Melee players. Unfortunately, aMSa (Misaya Chikamoto), the popular Japanese Yoshi, can’t attend because he has the stomach flu. The field isn’t as deep as Smash 4, but the names at the top make this a major event. Winning this Melee tournament will require running the gauntlet of Mango (Joseph Marquez), Mew2King (Jason Zimmerman), and Hungrybox (Juan DeBiedma).

KI World Cup Levels Up

Twitter.com/Cptn_EO

Despite missing out on making it into Evo, the KI community is going strong. After another average attendance year, the future of KI was in the balance. The community responded with a well-funded and represented tournament.

Regardless, Sleep (Darnell Waller) was able to continue his run of strong play with his win at KO cup. He couples this win with his Evo title, which makes him the undisputed number one. The Ultra Tour will continue into Season 3 with Combo Breaker on the horizon.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Xian Wins First SFV Capcom Cup Event at Final Round 20

A character switch in season two for Xian (Kun Ho Xian) partially boosted his play at Final Round 20, leading to his first victory in Street Fighter V. The opening tournament of the Capcom Cup 2017 had a familiar feel to it with Xian taking the win over Fuudo (Keira Ai). The two former USF4 Evo champions showed they are contenders in Street Fighter V.

First off, Xian has seemingly found his new main in Ibuki. After trying to make F.A.N.G. viable in season one, a character switch was warranted. Xian picked a character that had similar attributes to Gen in Street Fighter IV; Ibuki’s burst damage makes her among the best characters, and Xian meshes perfectly.

Regardless, it’s good to see Xian back competing at his potential. His character choice in season one clearly held him back to some extent. The switch to Ibuki makes him a contending threat at every event. He’s a player to keep an eye-on through the rest of Capcom Cup.

Unexpected Results 

In the first tournament back from the offseason of SFV, the results were zany. Established players in season one fell outside of the top 17. Top eight only featured four Asian Born players, as NuckleDu (Du Dang) finished third, KBrad (Kenneth Bradley) finished fourth, and 801 Strider (Gustavo Romero) rounded it out in fifth.

Despite failing to beat Fuudo and advance to Grand Finals, NuckleDu had another strong outing. It’s just another top-five finish and his counter-pick strategy seems to have strengthened going into season two. Looking ahead, the top three definitely look like three of the favorites to win Capcom Cup.

Final Round featured tons of talent, and as a result, Ricki Ortiz fell out of the bracket in 33rd alongside Kazunoko (Ryoto Inoue). It was a tough tournament as most top players wanted to make an appearance for the kickoff event. It also set a precedent heading into this season that anyone and any character can win at any tournament.

Character diversity

In all of top eight, seven unique characters were used. Cammy, as some have suggested, seems to be the strongest character in the game. She had a strong presence. Players are still finding what works, but this was a good first look.

twitter.com/winnersstayson

Kenneth “KBrad” Bradley

KBrad not only came in and stole the show, but he put on a dazzling display of skill during his run. Finishing in the top four at an event of this caliber is a testament to his overall game. But despite that, he’ll be remembered for his match against Wolfkrone (Joshua Philpot). One of the longest standing personal rivalries in the fighting game community hit a boiling point when KBrad secured the victory.

Additionally, Kbrad was the talk of the entire weekend. The set at Final Round is just another chapter in what should be a highly entertaining 2017. Either way, this was a great event to start the new year.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Bllake!

Blizzard Asking Investors to Commit to the Overwatch League With High Priced Entry Fee

https://plus.google.com/+Blizzard

After months of silence from Blizzard since the announcement of the Overwatch league, they’ve finally revealed the entrance fee. Teams will be able to buy-in for the cheap price of anywhere from $2 million to $15 million, according to Sports Business Daily.

Details are still scarce at this point on what buying-in entails for a new team owner. It was reported that the price is set appropriate to the market they’re buying into. For example, to start an Overwatch franchise in Los Angeles, California, a huge esports market, will set a buyer back $15 million. Most markets will even out at $2-$5 million with the large markets going closer to $10m.

With this information, Blizzard has made it clear that they are committed and highly value this new league. If this is what they’re asking owners for at the conception of the league, Blizzard is expecting this to be a highly-profitable venture. In the past, esports leagues formed with franchising in mind, but never had the backing that the Overwatch league will have with Blizzard.

It’s a brand new idea and is not guaranteed to be a success. Blizzard is asking owners to trust in a game that hasn’t proved itself as an esports title yet. It’s also essentially going all-in on one esports title, with the going rate set in the millions. Most major teams can afford the entry fee, but might spread them a little thin across other titles.

The idea behind it is to setup an established Overwatch league, similar to the more successful sports leagues in America (NFL, MLB, etc.). Stadium tickets and merchandising will be the main draw for potential investors. Also, to be apart of the worlds firs esports league with franchised teams.

Revenue Sharing 

At this point, there are no details on how the revenue sharing will work between all teams. People have speculated it could look similar to League of Legends LCS, but those are just rumors. This new league will avoid some of the LCS’s pitfalls in relegation , which will allow fans to become more familiar with players and teams. This will drive up profits. Also, getting to cheer for the home town team will instantly give fans a reason to invest in a team.

The issue right now is whether or not esports fans will support this new idea enough to keep it alive. Overwatch has a highly-active player-base, but most competitive Overwatch matches average out at about 15k viewers a stream. Now, that’s not bad for a new esports title, but turning around and asking owners for millions of dollars is a little suspect.

The idea is to tap into this massive player-base and create a fan base through them. There is no guarantee that it will work. Overwatch is a great game to play, but watching can be an entirely different story. The action in a match can be hectic and hard-to-follow for casual fans. It’s hard to get a grasp on which players are the ones to watch.

Ultimately, Blizzard will have to make updates to the UI and add more in-depth statistical data to make it easier on fans. It will take some tweaking to make this work. With Blizzard’s backing, however, it doesn’t seem unreasonable for owners to invest. As a fan myself, I hope this league is the future of esports. A more familiar setup will entice the traditional sports fan to watch. This could be the next step in the evolution of esports.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Armada Completes The Smash Summit Four-Peat

Photo courtesy of http://wiki.teamliquid.net/smash/File:Ss_spring2017.png

Can anyone stop Armada (Adam Lindgren)? His recent stretch of tournament wins has never been done before. He’s only lost one set in the last five months and has won 10 out of the last 11 tournaments he’s entered. After winning his fourth consecutive Smash Summit, the question needs to be asked: can anyone beat him?

For example, players are now suggesting a bounty on Armada’s head to incentive players to try just a little harder next time. At this point, it doesn’t seem to matter what or how you approach Armada. He’s going to figure that play style out and counter twice as hard. Wether it’s his improving Fox play or his quick ability to pick up tendency’s there seems to be no answers.

Additionally, he’s now the only player who can claim a four-peat at a singular major tournament. Ken (Ken Hoang) has done this during dark ages, but winning four consecutive Summit’s relatively easily is unprecedented. The event only invites the best-of-the-best, but for Armada it’s almost like playing pools at a normal major.

He’s not only separated himself from the rest of the pack, but now has made it clear he’s a level above even the gods of Melee. It’s almost a foregone conclusion who wins the tournament. Betting for the field is a mistake. It’s Marvel vs Capcom 2 Justin Wong-esque as he wins every event.

As for his Summit performance, on the surface it doesn’t seem that impressive. He had two decisive wins over ChuDat (Daniel Rodriguez) and Leffen (William Hjelte). He went Fox for the majority of the day based on matchups. His Fox-ditto play has now surpassed the best Fox’s as he clearly had the edge against Leffen. The only match he truly struggled in was against Hungrybox (Juan DeBiedma) in winners finals.

Winners Finals 

At this point, Armada’s made a clear separation between him and Hungrybox. There was a time where he struggled against Jigglypuff in the Fox matchup. Those days are long gone as Armada has essentially optimized his play style against Jigglypuff and more specifically Hungrybox.

Early on, Armada wasn’t getting away with rolls or techs in as Hbox was able to capitalize with rest punishes. As soon as Armada noticed that, the match turned towards his favor. In a close 3-2 set, it still never really felt like Hbox had control of the game. It was a constant struggle waiting for Armada to overextend as he dodges double-lasers.

Ultimately, this win places Armada higher than any player to pick up a GameCube controller. The last quarter of the 2016-2017 has been all Armada. It’s almost annoying how good he’s become. There used to be a shred of doubt there but he’s completely destroyed that idea. He’s the best to ever do it and until further notice, he’s unstoppable

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

OGN Apex Season 2 Playoffs are Here

The OGN Apex second regular season has come to a close, as Fnatic and Cloud9 miss the playoffs. The west only gets one team in EnvyUs. After an exhausting decision making process, the round two groups have been decided.

Based on random drawings of the first seeds, the groups were decided. Lunatic-Hai got the first pick, and not only do they get to pick their group, but also their opponent. They chose the defending champions, EnvyUs. With all the Korean teams polled, most teams wanted to face the one foreign team.

  • Photo courtesy of twitch.tv/ognglobal

The Group of Death 

For example, the challenger qualifier team, Meta Athena, beat EnvyUs 3-0 in the group stages. The top ranked team showed weaknesses and now has to play in the group of death. In the other match in group A, KongDoo Uncia will face Runaway. Uncia’s sister team, Panthera, had a strong showing against RunAway, holding them to only one point in the entire match.

Additionally, DNCE (Kim Se Yong), from Uncia said “he wanted to get it over with” referring to playing either EnvyUs or the other top Korean team Lunatic-Hai. One of the three best teams in the world will be eliminated before the bracket. The hope for foreign Overwatch all relies on the skills of Taimou (Timo Ketunnen) and HarryHook (Jonathon Tejedor Rua) who carried them to this point.

Prediction: Lunatic-Hai is the most well-rounded team in group A. The supports are possibly the best in all of Overwatch with Whoru (Lee Seunf Joon) playing the DPS role at an extremely high level. KongDoo Uncia will be the second seed. Uncia struggled against Cloud 9, but this team still has strong enough tank players to beat EnvyUs.

photo courtesy of twitch.tv/ognglobal

Group B

In group B, it will most likely come down to who can beat KongDoo Panthers. MetaAthena had a strong showing in round one by beating EnvyUs 3-0. It was the most shocking result of the regular season. MetaAthena had the best draft, avoiding three of the top four teams.

On the other hand, LW Blue and Afreeca Freecs Blue are no slouches. AFB finished second last year in Apex and LW Blue is highly regarded as one of the best teams. The prohibitive favorites will be the latter, but these teams can give them a run for their money. AFB had a rough regular season escaping out from group C by eliminating Cloud 9.

Prediction: it’s tough seeing anyone beat Panthera with their ability to adjust to compositions with excellent flex play. KongDoo Panthera wins the group. MetaAthena is clearly the second best team, Hoon (Choi Jae Hoon) is one of the best Zarya players in a sea of Korean Zarya’s.

The Disappointments
It was a sad day for western Overwatch. Misfits, Cloud 9, and Fnatic all missed the playoffs. Misfits and Cloud 9 had their chance to recover, but lost in the last set to miss out. Cloud 9 took a strong Uncia club to game 5, but ended up getting full-held on Eichenwalde. Each team finished third in their respective groups.

Furthermore, Korean teams like BK Stars and Conbox Spirit had a letdown season. As HarryHook said early on, “it seems harder to win this season.” The level of play has clearly gone up and the rest of the teams need to play catch-up. Squads like Cloud 9 and Misfits, who barely missed the playoffs, might need a retool. The rest might need a full-rebuild.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

 

Japan Steals the Show at Frostbite 2017

Photo courtesy of twitch.tv/unrivaledtournaments

The Japanese invasion is real. Even despite ZeRo (Gonzalo Barrios) scraping his way through losers to win Frostbite 2017, the Japanese tremors reverberated around the entire venue on Sunday afternoon.

It’s known how strong the Japan Smash 4 players are, but it wasn’t clear exactly how strong until this weekend. The surprising part was the players who ended up at the top of the results page. It wasn’t the usual names, like Abadango (Yuta Kawamura), Kameme (Takuto Ono), or Ranai (Ryuto Hayashi). It was the play of Lucario main Tsu and Olimar main Shuton that shocked everyone with improbable runs in their first international tournament.

Additionally, Japan had its moment in the regional crew battles. The talented Japanese squad pulled the biggest upset of the weekend, taking out the American squad. The theme continued from Saturday night to Sunday morning. Kameme started the day off sending MKLeo (Leonardo Lopez Perez) to losers bracket. Tsu followed it up by squeaking out a win against VoiD (James Makekau-Tyson), and took that momentum all the way to grand finals.

On top of that, Shuton was able to eliminate the world number two, and Tsu took the winners finals set over the greatest of all time, ZeRo. It was a proud day for Japanese Smash. It seemed to start the trend of upsets that followed throughout all of top 48.

The Losers Bracket Bloodbath

Both MKLeo and Ally, two of the heavy favorites, finished outside the top five. Tweek (Gavin Dempsey), who had been on a tear in the last couple months, ended his run in the first round of top 48. The early upsets on Saturday created one of the scariest losers brackets ever. Ranai played Ally (Elliot Bastien Carroza-Oyeca) in round one losers. That’s two of the worlds best players facing off in an elimination game right away.

In any case, top players were falling fast and early. It set up improbable losers runs, including Ally running through the gauntlet, and Shunto taking out four of his fellow countryman before slipping in the top 8. When Tweek and Ranai both are eliminated in round one losers, it shows just how tough Frostbite 2017 was.

Grand Finals

On a day filled with electric finishes, Grand Finals did not disappoint. Tsu showed early on that despite the stock count, he can use Lucario’s comeback mechanic to stay in any game. If his percentage raises past 130% he suddenly becomes impossible to hit. ZeRo was the only one capable of finding those kill moves in clutch situations.

Combined, the two played three sets. In all, the final set count was 7-6, with ZeRo’s Diddy Kong getting the win on last stock, last hit. It was the first time all day anyone was able to catch the elusive Lucario main.

As always, ZeRo’s adjustments came into play and ended the unsuspecting tournament run from Tsu. It was America’s first look at Tsu. Based off of today, it won’t be the last time we’ll be seeing the Lucario main.

You can ‘Like’ The Game Haus on Facebook and ‘Follow’ us on Twitter for more sports and esports articles from other great TGH writers along with Blake!

Page 1 of 712345...Last »