Why The NBA Needs A Franchise Tag

 

(http://www.huntingtonbuzz.tv/view_article.php?article_id=998)

(http://www.huntingtonbuzz.tv/view_article.php?article_id=998)

 

 

 

The NBA needs a franchise tag similar to the one in the NFL. It is as simple as that. Imagine Kevin Durant being stuck in Oklahoma City for at least one more season. The landscape within the NBA could be entirely different, had the Thunder been given the option to tag Durant.

If you have watched Sportscenter at all last month, you have seen them talking about the players who have been designated for a franchise tag trying to get a long term deal done in the NFL. The deal must have been done by July 15th at 4 P.M. EST.

In the NFL, a franchise is allowed to tag a player with the franchise tag. A franchise tag is a designation a team may apply to a player that is  scheduled to become an unrestricted free agent. The franchise tag binds the player to the team for at least another year. The tag is a valuable asset to the franchise, but the franchise tag can be tricky business. It really helps a team make sure they don’t lose a valuable player. At least for another year.

In most cases this is good but can be a bad thing too. A player may not be happy with getting tagged. If a player gets hurt during the year they are given the franchise tag it hurts their chances at signing a long term deal. This may cause a holdout or make a player decide to not play hard. There are pros and cons to a franchise tag, but I am positive that NBA owners and general managers wish they had the chance to use a franchise tag.

A franchise tag in the NBA would be a way to stop the formation of super teams. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver was quoted saying, “I’ve read several stories suggesting that that’s something that the league wants, this notion of two super teams, that it’s a huge television attraction,” Silver said. “I don’t think it’s good for the league, just to be really clear.” The commissioner knows that a league full of bottom feeders is bad for business. The reason the NFL is loved is because of the parity within the league. The NBA has lost that since the formation of super teams.

(http://www.sportal.co.nz/nba/kevin-durant-warriors-adam-silver-super-teams/1ez5j8zodkgza1l6pgsyvxkj7t)

(http://www.sportal.co.nz/nba/kevin-durant-warriors-adam-silver-super-teams/1ez5j8zodkgza1l6pgsyvxkj7t)

If there had been a franchise tag in the summer of 2010 LeBron would have been stuck in Cleveland at least one more season. Cleveland could have worked out some kind of trade that year if LeBron was dead set on leaving. The Cavs also could have convinced LeBron to stay. Trades and signings could have been made after tagging Lebron to give him faith in the franchise.

The same could have happened with Kevin Durant this offseason. The Thunder could have tried and traded Durant after tagging him. They could have gotten something in return rather than watching him just walk away.  A long term deal could have been reached with the extra time that a franchise tag would provide.

The players have too much power to form super teams. Ever since LeBron and Bosh joined Miami other players have mimicked the move to try and compete. Adam Silver is correct in saying super teams are bad for the NBA.

I believe a simple addition of a franchise tag in the next collective bargaining agreement would really help the NBA franchises. It may cause a lockout, but it would be for the betterment of the product put on the court.

It hurts the players a bit, but even if it does, it only sets their plans to leave back by a year. I think it will also help the NBA regulate the formation of super teams. The NBA needs a franchise tag for the parity of the game. Franchise tags could be a simple solution to the death of competition.

 

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